Engineer?

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xpc316e
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Engineer?

Postby xpc316e » 1 Mar 2013, 8:14pm

We sometimes go into a school if it is in a deprived area prior to the Bikeability training to run a bike fixing day. If we do not do this kind of thing then half the children who turn up cannot do the course because their bikes are unroadworthy.

This week we pitched up at a school and a father told us that he hadn't brought his son's bike along as it had a puncture. We asked him to go home and get it, as we would happily deal with it. Dad returns with bike and explains that the inner tube is completely ripped apart, or he'd have fixed it himself. In the course of conversation he reveals that he is an engineer at a local diesel fuel pump makers.

When I looked at the bike I found the front forks were the wrong way around, and the brake pads were rubbing on the tyre sidewalls. The horrendous puncture was a small thorn. So I am left wondering how much mechanical aptitude some engineers have.
Riding a Dahon Jetstream P9 folder, a Claud Butler Cape Wrath MTB, and the latest acquisition, an early 90s Vision R30 above seat steered recumbent.

Vorpal
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Re: Engineer?

Postby Vorpal » 1 Mar 2013, 8:21pm

Maybe he's an electrical engineer?

Lots of folks with neither mechanical aptitude nor training call themselves engineers. There was a whole thread about it once. A quick search didn't turn it up. I'll look again later.
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al_yrpal
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Re: Engineer?

Postby al_yrpal » 1 Mar 2013, 11:07pm

When I was a student apprentice all the electrical apprentices did two years in workshops just like the mechanical student apprentices. These days people just seem to go to university without doing anything practical, get an engineering degree and start calling themselves engineers. British gas fitters, washing machine mechanics, tv technicians and IT technicians seem to call themselves engineers. It's all gone to pot. I am not surprised that someone calling themselves an engineer can't repair a puncture these days. Lots of people also seem to be so bone idle they won't tackle any practical task themselves, its pathetic IMO, but I suppose it does create a 'service economy'.

Al
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. Make a difference...

DDW
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Re: Engineer?

Postby DDW » 2 Mar 2013, 7:37am

al_yrpal wrote:When I was a student apprentice all the electrical apprentices did two years in workshops just like the mechanical student apprentices. These days people just seem to go to university without doing anything practical, get an engineering degree and start calling themselves engineers. British gas fitters, washing machine mechanics, tv technicians and IT technicians seem to call themselves engineers. It's all gone to pot. I am not surprised that someone calling themselves an engineer can't repair a puncture these days. Lots of people also seem to be so bone idle they won't tackle any practical task themselves, its pathetic IMO, but I suppose it does create a 'service economy'.

Al


Too true,

As an electrical engineer my apprenticeship included a year on mechanical workshop, while going to uni as day release for degree.

Now working in merchant shipping and finding uni leavers with impressive degrees who can't wire a plug or change a bearing arriving on ships as officers without a clue. :evil:
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Re: Engineer?

Postby Vorpal » 2 Mar 2013, 8:09am

“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

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al_yrpal
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Re: Engineer?

Postby al_yrpal » 2 Mar 2013, 11:33am

Yes, I know we discussed it once before...
But as this is supposed to be the Cyclist TOURING Club forum it seems to me that anyone setting off touring should be prepared to undertake almost any repair or maintenance task on their bike. When I recently read Riian Mansers book, 'around Africa on my bicycle' it amazed me that the guy didn't seem to have a clue about bikes. He was so focussed on completing his epic 23,500km trip that he hardly seemed to do any preparation at all. Consequently reams of the book are devoted to his trials and tribulations with his bike which he doesn't seem capable of fixing himself.. Anyone considering doing a long tour away from bike shops should be able to carry out adjustments and replace spokes, otherwise, like he was, you are stuffed.

Al
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. Make a difference...

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Ash28
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Re: Engineer?

Postby Ash28 » 3 Mar 2013, 8:23pm

I do all my own bike repairs servicing etc and have built many bikes. I worked in engineering as a machinist for over 20 years. I know chuff all about diesel pumps.
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Ash28
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Re: Engineer?

Postby Ash28 » 3 Mar 2013, 8:34pm

But then my daughters bike is not the best example of a well maintained bike. She is not showing much interest in cycling so it doesn't get much attention. Perhaps he just doesn't have the time or inclination.
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