How Much Do They Pay

For discussions within the Cycle Training profession.
JohnValentine

Postby JohnValentine » 13 Mar 2008, 6:00pm

I tend to work direct for my clients and I started by charging £10 per hour. I then tried £15, then £20 ... I now charge £35 per hour (it normally overruns) and I have only had 1 rejection.

Working for a secure hospital I was asked to increase my rate because they didn't think it was enough for the work I was doing

nigel_s
Posts: 362
Joined: 18 Mar 2007, 9:52am
Location: Near Bath, Somerset

Postby nigel_s » 13 Mar 2008, 7:51pm

Hi John!

(It's Nigel from our LifeCycle Instructors course.)

£35 an hour - sounds like a fair rate.

bikeboy
Posts: 11
Joined: 22 Mar 2008, 8:47pm

Postby bikeboy » 22 Mar 2008, 9:11pm

Some good topics here however, how you can equate cycle training to a teachers rate of pay is quite beyond me. A four day, poorly evaluated and monitored course (in 95% of cases) compared to three years of study + 1 years on the job training hmmmm. You do the math! I would also question £35ph. Further education teaching within a regulated college pays roughly £18 - £25. Don't get me wrong, if you can get it, all the best. I would however, question the morality of providing a "life skill" for that amount of money.

nigel_s
Posts: 362
Joined: 18 Mar 2007, 9:52am
Location: Near Bath, Somerset

Postby nigel_s » 22 Mar 2008, 9:49pm

bikeboy wrote:... I would however, question the morality of providing a "life skill" for that amount of money.


Excuse me?

bikeboy
Posts: 11
Joined: 22 Mar 2008, 8:47pm

Postby bikeboy » 23 Mar 2008, 10:09am

If you are training adults, then fine, if they are daft enough to pay £35 then it's up to them. If we are trying to encourage kids to get off their sofas onto saddles then £35ph is scandalous, hence my "excessive" statement but it did the job!

keepontriking
Posts: 472
Joined: 5 Jan 2007, 9:40pm
Location: Hampshire
Contact:

Postby keepontriking » 23 Mar 2008, 10:49am

I would like to know whether this £35ph is for training an individual or a group.
In a group of say five, each trainee would be paying £7ph which IMO would be an acceptable 'client rate'. That would be reasonably close to the Cycling England 'grant' rate of £40 for a course

In the end it comes down to market forces, but I am unsure that charging £35ph for an individual would fit in with the Bikeability ethos of encouraging cycling for all.

JohnV - perhaps you could clarify?

adinigel
Posts: 177
Joined: 21 Oct 2007, 1:07am
Location: Swindon - Home of the Magic Roundabout

Postby adinigel » 28 May 2008, 10:28pm

bikeboy wrote:If you are training adults, then fine, if they are daft enough to pay £35 then it's up to them. If we are trying to encourage kids to get off their sofas onto saddles then £35ph is scandalous, hence my "excessive" statement but it did the job!


Do you not think a child learning how to stay alive on the road is worth £35? How much do you think their life is worth?

Nigel
DSA registered Driving Instructor, RoSPA Diploma in Advanced Car Instruction, SAFED registered van trainer, National Standards Cycling Instructor

ianr1950
Posts: 1336
Joined: 16 Apr 2007, 9:23am

Postby ianr1950 » 29 May 2008, 10:51am

More fool the adults if they pay £35.00 an hour (whether it be for themselves or their children) to be taught something that is not particularly difficult to learn and doesn't need any specialist skills or too much time to learn to do.

adinigel
Posts: 177
Joined: 21 Oct 2007, 1:07am
Location: Swindon - Home of the Magic Roundabout

Postby adinigel » 31 May 2008, 5:19pm

You obviously don't believe trainers need specialist skills then? Personally I think you are wrong. Trainers DO need specialist skills.

I will come back to this one later, I have to take my grandson to the car wash! :wink:

Nigel
DSA registered Driving Instructor, RoSPA Diploma in Advanced Car Instruction, SAFED registered van trainer, National Standards Cycling Instructor

bikeboy
Posts: 11
Joined: 22 Mar 2008, 8:47pm

Postby bikeboy » 31 May 2008, 6:18pm

Just for the record, I think a childs life is priceless, I just wouldn't charge it!!

ianr1950
Posts: 1336
Joined: 16 Apr 2007, 9:23am

Postby ianr1950 » 31 May 2008, 7:48pm

adinigel wrote:You obviously don't believe trainers need specialist skills then? Personally I think you are wrong. Trainers DO need specialist skills.

I will come back to this one later, I have to take my grandson to the car wash! :wink:

Nigel


No I, don't believe that you need any particular specialist skills to teach basic cycle craft.
Certainly not anywhere near the level where you can charge £35.00 an hour for it.

david143
Posts: 516
Joined: 11 May 2008, 9:37am

Postby david143 » 31 May 2008, 9:07pm

ianr1950 wrote:
adinigel wrote:You obviously don't believe trainers need specialist skills then? Personally I think you are wrong. Trainers DO need specialist skills.

I will come back to this one later, I have to take my grandson to the car wash! :wink:

Nigel


No I, don't believe that you need any particular specialist skills to teach basic cycle craft.
Certainly not anywhere near the level where you can charge £35.00 an hour for it.


It isn't something that requires years of training to be able to do. Yes, you need to be able to communicate and get your trainees to follow and learn, but I wouldn't put a £35 per hour value on that.

adinigel
Posts: 177
Joined: 21 Oct 2007, 1:07am
Location: Swindon - Home of the Magic Roundabout

Postby adinigel » 31 May 2008, 10:47pm

So, if trainers don't need specialist skills, can anyone do the job? It isn't simply a case of telling the trainees what to do and repeating it until they do what you want them to do.

Nigel
DSA registered Driving Instructor, RoSPA Diploma in Advanced Car Instruction, SAFED registered van trainer, National Standards Cycling Instructor

david143
Posts: 516
Joined: 11 May 2008, 9:37am

Postby david143 » 31 May 2008, 11:04pm

adinigel wrote:So, if trainers don't need specialist skills, can anyone do the job? It isn't simply a case of telling the trainees what to do and repeating it until they do what you want them to do.

Nigel


Depends on what you consider specialist. Can anyone fix computers, be a Nurse, or do many other jobs that pay far less than £35 an hour?

adinigel
Posts: 177
Joined: 21 Oct 2007, 1:07am
Location: Swindon - Home of the Magic Roundabout

Postby adinigel » 1 Jun 2008, 8:04am

Yes, those require specialist skills too.

When comparing salary, though, is the simple hourly rate the most relevant method? How many individual instructors are able to fill their week with work at this rate? I would guess at not many. So if the earning hours are not that high, then I see no reason why they shouldn't be paid at a good rate. Try comparing the annual salaries of these jobs. Perhaps a more realistic comparison would be with music teachers?

Nigel
DSA registered Driving Instructor, RoSPA Diploma in Advanced Car Instruction, SAFED registered van trainer, National Standards Cycling Instructor