Eucalyptus Firewood

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thirdcrank
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by thirdcrank »

I often find youtube a help. I don't know if this is the same model as yours

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUbL8oCHizA

Not only a help with doing a job, but help with deciding if it's within my limited range of skills before I try. This looks like one I'd have entrusted to my LCS (Local chainsaw shop - if such outfits exist anymore.)
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Mick F
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

That machine looks similar to mine, but his ideas wouldn't have worked with mine as mine is smaller.

1. The spring couldn't be compressed like that. I tried, but the housing wouldn't allow it.
2. As my machine is smaller, the cover wouldn't go on far enough at the front to engage the release mechanism latch.
Good video nonetheless.

Simpler to remove the flywheel and drive, so the brake isn't fouling anything at all, and the cover can go on.

No doubt my Husqvarna 555 video is out there, but when I began the task I was outside in the sunshine, and learnt as I went along. Typical of me of course! :D
Mick F. Cornwall
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Mick F
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

Just cut up some more lengths of it into logs. Some nearly a foot across. Also, some were very knotty and wouldn't split no mater how hard I swung the splitting maul, so I had to cut along the grain. I've come in knackered ........ not for the chainsawing which was easy, but the swinging of the heavy splitter. No wonder why some people buy splitting machines.

This is similar to mine.
https://www.toolstation.com/roughneck-s ... aul/p14628

Chainsaw worked a treat, and I made sure the brake worked well and instantly before I set to.
Mick F. Cornwall
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Mick F
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

Mick F wrote: 18 Apr 2021, 10:36am ............. No wonder why some people buy splitting machines.
Sorely tempted by this.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-TON-ELECTR ... %3A2334524
Screen Shot 2021-04-18 at 11.06.07.png
Mick F. Cornwall
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by MikeF »

Mick F wrote: 18 Apr 2021, 10:36am Just cut up some more lengths of it into logs. Some nearly a foot across. Also, some were very knotty and wouldn't split no mater how hard I swung the splitting maul, so I had to cut along the grain. I've come in knackered ........ not for the chainsawing which was easy, but the swinging of the heavy splitter. No wonder why some people buy splitting machines.

This is similar to mine.
https://www.toolstation.com/roughneck-s ... aul/p14628

Chainsaw worked a treat, and I made sure the brake worked well and instantly before I set to.
Splitting mauls work by shock, and are not good for some woods that don't split easily. If you want to cut down the grain with a chain saw you need to sharpen the teeth at a steeper angle. My experience of using eucalyptus as firewood is that it burns very slowly and doesn't give out much heat.
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master
MikeF
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by MikeF »

Mick F wrote: 17 Apr 2021, 4:33pm That machine looks similar to mine, but his ideas wouldn't have worked with mine as mine is smaller.

1. The spring couldn't be compressed like that. I tried, but the housing wouldn't allow it.
2. As my machine is smaller, the cover wouldn't go on far enough at the front to engage the release mechanism latch.
Good video nonetheless.

Simpler to remove the flywheel and drive, so the brake isn't fouling anything at all, and the cover can go on.

No doubt my Husqvarna 555 video is out there, but when I began the task I was outside in the sunshine, and learnt as I went along. Typical of me of course! :D
One reason for not buying Husqvarna. Most things are much easier with a Stihl. I've used both quite extensively.
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master
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Mick F
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

Thanks for the advice Mike.
Not going to swap my Husqvarna now, and I'm aware of how tough and knotty eucalyptus is.
I disagree about the wood burning slowly and not giving out much heat.
Remember, this tree is dead, and has been for a year or more.

Ash is my favourite, but eucalyptus is much heavier and far more difficult to split, but ours seems to give out lots of heat. It doesn't matter what it provides, as we have tons of it, and still loads yet to cut ................ and now I've fixed the Husqvarna, I can carry on during this week.

The difficult bits are carrying the cut lengths from where it fell, and then cutting into rings and spitting. Let alone barrowing into the house.
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Mike Sales
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mike Sales »

MikeF wrote: 18 Apr 2021, 6:00pm My experience of using eucalyptus as firewood is that it burns very slowly and doesn't give out much heat.
It seems to burn pretty well out in the bush!
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by MikeF »

Mick F wrote: 18 Apr 2021, 8:17pm Thanks for the advice Mike.
Not going to swap my Husqvarna now, and I'm aware of how tough and knotty eucalyptus is.
I disagree about the wood burning slowly and not giving out much heat.
Remember, this tree is dead, and has been for a year or more.

Ash is my favourite, but eucalyptus is much heavier and far more difficult to split, but ours seems to give out lots of heat. It doesn't matter what it provides, as we have tons of it, and still loads yet to cut ................ and now I've fixed the Husqvarna, I can carry on during this week.

The difficult bits are carrying the cut lengths from where it fell, and then cutting into rings and spitting. Let alone barrowing into the house.
If you find it's burning OK, then that's fine. For a time we had to heat everything with a wood fire. That's when it becomes hard and you soon learn what's best - not that you always have a choice.
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master
francovendee
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by francovendee »

I think for Mick wood is a bit like beer.
No bad beers but some are better than others. :lol: :lol:
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Mick F
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

............... and some aren't worth bothering with too! :D

Willow and Lelandii to mention only two. Not worth the petrol in the chainsaw or the time in doing it.
Mick F. Cornwall
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by MikeF »

Mick F wrote: 19 Apr 2021, 8:57am ............... and some aren't worth bothering with too! :D

Willow and Lelandii to mention only two. Not worth the petrol in the chainsaw or the time in doing it.
Willow is fine if it's dry enough, and willow charcoal is excellent for lighting a fire. It will light using a steel striker and that's not easy with many charcoals. Hazel is very good, easy to light and rapidly gives out a lot of heat, but, of course, it's never large.
As regards splitting dry wood is often very difficult to split whatever it is. Green oak will split quite easily, but weathered oak becomes as hard as steel - impossible to drive a nail into it or screw into it.
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master
Ben@Forest
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Ben@Forest »

Saws.JPG
This is a Mercury Disston saw I saw at a show some years ago. I reckon it was 1948 vintage, and it weighed a proverbial ton. I worked a saw frequently for nine years, think I'd have had to have muscles like Popeye to have worked this!
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Mick F
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

100% eucalyptus.
IMG_0530.jpg
Mick F. Cornwall
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Re: Eucalyptus Firewood

Post by Mick F »

Took a couple of 1ft diameter 1ft lengths to a friend's farming place the other side of Launceston yesterday.
Well, I should say that Mrs Mick F drove there with the dog on the back seat and the logs in the boot, whilst I cycled the 20odd miles on (splittable :D ) Moulton.
Sailor the dog had acres and acres of fields and gardens to run though, all fenced off and no livestock at the moment.

They have one of these.
Screen Shot 2021-04-28 at 09.59.35.png
It worked very well indeed, and was impressed. They said we can borrow it for a week or so if we want.
Dunno if we'll borrow it, but maybe buy the smaller version.
Screen Shot 2021-04-28 at 10.04.19.png
Mick F. Cornwall
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