Bread making

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deliquium
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Re: Bread making

Postby deliquium » 13 Feb 2019, 7:48am

661-Pete wrote:Assuming your have the space, I'd suggest making two loaves at once, and putting one in the freezer until you need it. Saves energy! But use the 1-loaf-a-week regime if you prefer.


Thanks Pete for all your help and details, much appreciated :D

I only have a small freezer and sometimes there's not enough room for a whole loaf - but point well made, as it's undoubtedly so wasteful using the oven for one loaf :(

Currently I don't bother giving my loaves a second 'prove', they get whacked in the tin after kneading and baked as soon as is risen suffiently - would you say the more usual double rise method you outlined is necessary for sourdough bread that will only be eaten toasted?
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661-Pete
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Re: Bread making

Postby 661-Pete » 13 Feb 2019, 3:47pm

deliquium wrote:Currently I don't bother giving my loaves a second 'prove', they get whacked in the tin after kneading and baked as soon as is risen suffiently - would you say the more usual double rise method you outlined is necessary for sourdough bread that will only be eaten toasted?

Hard to say. I don't think the fact that you toast your bread makes any difference (we eat some of ours toasted, some not).

We also make a half-and-half (i.e. half wholemeal and half white) bread, using cultivated yeast (not sourdough) and that one is given just a single rising. But I don't think that works for 100% wholemeal bread. Also, I don't think it works for sourdough.

Incidentally, we don't use loaf tins, we make all our bread (both sourdough and yeast) in the 'cob' shape, on flat baking sheets. I think that works better for sourdough. Here is one of yesterday's loaves, to give you an idea what it looks like:
Sourdough 12-02-19.jpg


But bear in mind that your starter culture will be different from ours - all starters are unique - and may behave differently. You need to experiment - and expect the occasional flop! Just keep it alive.
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Re: Bread making

Postby al_yrpal » 13 Feb 2019, 5:23pm

I believe the double rise method is to knock back the overlarge voids in sourdough and get a more even texture.

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Re: Bread making

Postby mercalia » 15 Feb 2019, 12:18pm

does any on ehere use Barley Malt extract instead of sugar? seems to give a nicer taste.

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Re: Bread making

Postby deliquium » 23 Feb 2019, 10:40am

As I'm lazy and experimental, only bothered whacking a sourdough dough* into a tin after a brief knead and baked after just one rise.

Overestimated the 'prove' time somewhat as was expecting much longer than yeasted doughs. Went out for a ride to retrun and find a flop sided loaf begging to get into the oven after only 2 hours.

Next week I'll do the recommended twice proving and see if there's any appreciable difference.

* Starter 30/70 wholegrain rye/strong white + 50/50 wholemeal/white bread flours

Does sourdough bread require more salt than yeasted breads? The flavour in this loaf seems to require more - maybe to counteract the wonderful tanginess?

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Re: Bread making

Postby 661-Pete » 23 Feb 2019, 12:13pm

That looks a pretty good effort: well done! I don't think sourdough needs more salt than yeast bread, it's mainly a matter of taste (though some salt is necessary to help with the rising). Experiment until you've got it right. I don't think the amount of salt you put in bread will harm you, assuming you aren't on a low-salt regime for medical reasons. We use about one rounded teaspoon - two level teaspoons - per Kg flour.
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Re: Bread making

Postby deliquium » 11 May 2019, 12:25pm

When I slice up 3 or 4 day old bread into two slice parcels in cling film and freeze, it often becomes cracked/fissured in the freezer even as soon as overnight. 50/50 wholemeal/white sourdough or yeasted, with or without seeds and it doesn't seem to matter whether it's a wet dough or a dryer dough.

Any suggestions as to why?
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Re: Bread making

Postby Vorpal » 11 May 2019, 6:40pm

deliquium wrote:When I slice up 3 or 4 day old bread into two slice parcels in cling film and freeze, it often becomes cracked/fissured in the freezer even as soon as overnight. 50/50 wholemeal/white sourdough or yeasted, with or without seeds and it doesn't seem to matter whether it's a wet dough or a dryer dough.

Any suggestions as to why?

If you have a freezer that has a utomatically defrosting function, it is taking the moisture out of your bread. This can be solved by sealing it completely in something airtight, like a freezer bag or container.
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Re: Bread making

Postby deliquium » 12 May 2019, 11:09am

^ It's a cheapo non auto defrosting wee freezer compartment atop the fridge. But I'll try the freezer bag thing on the next batch.

Although I thought I was almost double wrapping the two slice parcels tightly with cling film.
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Re: Bread making

Postby 661-Pete » 12 May 2019, 12:49pm

I wouldn't know I'm afraid, because we never freeze bread after slicing - only as whole loaves. This doesn't happen with us. Good luck with the bags.
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Re: Bread making

Postby Vorpal » 13 May 2019, 6:52am

deliquium wrote:^ It's a cheapo non auto defrosting wee freezer compartment atop the fridge. But I'll try the freezer bag thing on the next batch.

Although I thought I was almost double wrapping the two slice parcels tightly with cling film.

It might be because it's too dry to freeze well after 3 or 4 days. You could try keeping it in plastic from when it has cooled after baking, or slice and freeze some when it is fresh.
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Re: Bread making

Postby mercalia » 13 May 2019, 8:10am

maybe just make smaller loaves that you can eat within 2 days max? if it gets dry just toast it?

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Re: Bread making

Postby deliquium » 13 May 2019, 8:36am

Vorpal wrote:It might be because it's too dry to freeze well after 3 or 4 days. You could try keeping it in plastic from when it has cooled after baking, or slice and freeze some when it is fresh.


Good point! Am baking a new loaf today so will try freezing it in slices from fresh.
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Re: Bread making

Postby LollyKat » 14 May 2019, 11:03am

I used to do this when baking for my mother when she was very elderly. A tip - don't line all the slices up neatly when you put it in the bag, otherwise they'll stick together when frozen and it's difficult to extract a single one. If you offset each one a little then you can easily slide a knife in between to pry them off.

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Re: Bread making

Postby rjb » 21 May 2019, 8:35am

This is my first attempt at making a sourdough loaf. My starter made using 4 Tesco grapes looks like this after almost 3 days. Can I use half this starter in a white loaf and then feed the starter and store in the fridge for the next loaf next week? I've made bread using dried yeast before but sourdough is new and untried.
IMG_20190521_082818.jpg

Salivating in anticipation now. :lol:
PS do you just add the bits of grape to the loaf or do you try and remove them?
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