My New Bike

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Mick F
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Mick F » 4 Mar 2016, 10:00pm

Peejay56 wrote:Hi Mick,
The Moulton looks ace - and the same colour as your beloved Mercian? Is the Brooks Pro you've fitted from our get together in Okehampton?

All the best - Pete.
Yes!!! :D
Hi Pete!
Just noticed this post, sorry but there's been so many on this thread.

Yes, it's the Brooks Pro you so kindly gave me. Hard as nails, but fine. Thank you muchly! :D

Yes, Moulton is a similar colour to Mercian.
By design or by accident?
More likely design. :D
Mick F. Cornwall

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Mick F
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Mick F » 4 Mar 2016, 10:14pm

Freddie wrote: ...........(and the short wheelbase) ............

No it's not short.
108cm wheelbase. Just measured it.

101cm for Mercian, so that's 7cm difference. Three inches or thereabouts.

edit:
I said earlier that the wheel base was 105cm, but it is definitely 108cm as I've just measured it again.
Mick F. Cornwall

Brucey
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Brucey » 4 Mar 2016, 11:00pm

Hi Mick,
splashed out, eh? :wink:

Well there should be culture shock all round with that setup....FWIW I think the moulton favours spinners rather than mashers, I shall be interested to hear if your average cadence changes on this'un.

Re the brake levers; they are a different shape for sure but how far you reach is dependant on where your thumbs sit (which mightn't be the lowest point on one or other lever) and the mechanical efficiency varies with the cable attachment point in the lever as well as how long it is.... anyroadup I think you have 'New Super SLR' brake levers there which may not be a perfect match for older model Tektro brake calipers and I certainly wouldn't expect the braking to be brilliant with standard Tektro brake blocks either; get something decent, bed them in and your brakes will work better and your rims will last longer too (and by Jingo they need to, they cost enough to replace....half the size and twice the price.... what's all that about...?). Try Swissstop green maybe?

BTW I think your brake levers are (for modern shimano ones, by my taste) set in the wrong place on the handlebar; I'd have them a bit higher up on the bends I expect.

I couldn't live with that bottle where it is, not for a minute; maybe you could get a slimmer 'aero' bottle and special cage for it?

Maybe you have mentioned this already but how do you get on riding 'no-hands'? Also I agree about the static trail being different to the dynamic trail; the suspension ought to sag appreciably when you are sat on it.

I note with interest that (finally, it has only taken 50 years or something.... :roll: ) a grease nipple is fitted as standard on the suspension pivot these days...

Re the gearing; maybe you'll get used to it; I don't know how much adjustment you have on the front mech for bigger chainrings anyway....? BTW another option might be that (IIRC, maybe I dreamt it... :wink: :roll: ) there are such things as 'lockring-fit sprockets' that can add a ratio to a cassette, provided the hub is respaced too. [Quite how you would access such a thing using the regular STIs I'm not quite sure though.]

BTW I haven't quite fallen for the dark side myself in quite the same way but I have had (for the last few months) a Moulton APB that I've been fooling around with. This also uses 406 rims but of course allows a vast range of different tyres to be fitted because it has enormo-clearances. At some point I shall whack some ultremos I have in there and see how frisky it really can be.... :wink:

cheers
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Mick F
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Mick F » 5 Mar 2016, 7:11am

Thanks Brucey.
The brakes work excellently ........... but only from the drops.
I think it's a matter of getting used to the braking on the tops by using a different hand position and being aware of it.
The levers are quite "heavy" and firm in operation compared to Campag Ergo which are very light, instant and responsive.

I doubt my average cadence will increase. More likely, my average speed will decrease.
Yesterday, I was unable to pedal at 30mph coming down some hills. With the Mercian, I can do it easily so consequently I can go faster.

I bought the Moulton because I wanted a completely new riding experience .................... and I've got it! :D
Mick F. Cornwall

Edwards
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Edwards » 5 Mar 2016, 8:06am

Mick in your first post you said some thing about getting older and wanting low gears. Nobody has let you in on the old mans secret yet, so here goes.

At a certain age you need the lower gears to get up the hills but the real thing you need is the rest going down the few small hills that there are to go down. :wink:



Why is it that as you get older there are more climbs than there are times to coast and enjoy?
Keith Edwards
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Mick F
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Mick F » 5 Mar 2016, 8:16am

Very very true!
Where did my youth go? It seems as if it were there a couple of years ago, but now it has left the building. :oops:

Next question:
What about towing my CF trailer behind the Moulton?

I must have a play and see how it looks and tows. Main issue would be the rear suspension pivot on over-run. Pulling wouldn't do anything bad because the drive-train is all on the suspended part, but on over-run whilst braking the towed weight would be pushing on the pivot ................ but then again, the same force pushing would be there when climbing a hill anyway.
Mick F. Cornwall

Brucey
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Brucey » 5 Mar 2016, 8:54am

Mick F wrote:The brakes work excellently ........... but only from the drops.
I think it's a matter of getting used to the braking on the tops by using a different hand position and being aware of it.
The levers are quite "heavy" and firm in operation compared to Campag Ergo which are very light, instant and responsive.


I think that the Tektro brakes may have slightly stronger return springs in them than shimano or campag (perhaps because they may often be used with cheaper cables, or brake levers with no springs in) plus if you have (as I suspect) a slight mismatch between the lever and caliper MA (because of shimano's 'New Super SLR' brake ratio, for which It seems there are no specific long reach calipers..... :roll: ) you will indeed feel like there is more lever force required to get the calipers to move at all as well as a higher force to get the brakes to work.

If there is much difference between the lever force (against the caliper spring) 'pulling on' vs 'letting off' this also means that you have draggy cables (or possibly a slightly binding brake caliper, eg where the spring bears against the caliper arm and must slide). This is very common on bikes that are built in a bit of hurry; I expect you to find that the housing ends are not squared off properly, and the cable inners are bone dry, (or at least not lubricated enough...).

I would suggest that you do also experiment with moving the brake levers on the handlebars a little; this can make a much larger difference than you might expect, because of the way the hand works; to a good approximation, the closer to being straight the wrist is (rather than being cocked up or down), the greater the force that can be comfortably exerted on the brake levers. A possible knock-on of the 'high thumb' position on shimano hoods is that you may need to have the brake levers at a different angle before you can brake (from the hoods) in a similar way vs campag ones. Where campag levers might work OK if they are vertical, shimano ones often work best if the bottom of the lever is slightly forwards at rest.

Note also that if you raise the handlebars vs the saddle, this also affects the angle of the forearm and therefore where the brake levers ought to be for best braking effort from the hoods.

Anyway, I wish you well with your dabblings!

cheers
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Re: My New Bike

Postby manybikes » 5 Mar 2016, 9:15am

Very nice MickF. I suspect that after a few months you will have made a few modifications to get it "just so" specifically for you.

You mention the twitchiness (not sure that's exactly how you described it) of the steering initially. I have an elderly Bike Friday on 20 inch wheels which get used only occasionally. Whenever I get on it after a long layoff it seems strange and twitchy compared to my Mercian but it soon wears off. No suspension of course but wider tyres makes a huge difference in comfort.

On the subject of envy I was in Avon Cyclery the other day and almost fell in love with a Rolhoff disc Airnimal, similar price. I find it a difficult shop to exit without spending money!

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Re: My New Bike

Postby MGate » 5 Mar 2016, 11:14am

Moulton APB triple conversion.

That's my front suspension fork tube polisher. I've used a light oil in the tube where the nylon bushing is and Moly grease on the spring - moly grease is not supposed to 'stick' as much. Front now takes all road buzz out.

Moulton is Flat barred with Grip Shift changers.
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Re: My New Bike

Postby barrym » 5 Mar 2016, 11:29am

Mick F wrote:
barrym wrote:How about a Schlumpf?
Rohloff is the way ahead.
http://fudgescyclestore.com/product/mou ... e_complete

........... but it has flat 'bars.

Oh yes! If I wasn't just a teeny bit envious already, then that has just done it.

I could go for that, two things stop me. One is the sheer waste on me in how much I'd use it and for how long. The other is my knowledge to know what I'm buying. I'm rubbish at making decisions. Maybe a TSR8 would me more suitable and an easier decision.

Just for info have you worked out the gear inch range? Save me the trouble[WINKING FACE].
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Barry

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Re: My New Bike

Postby Edwards » 5 Mar 2016, 1:29pm

Mick F wrote:Very very true!Where did my youth go? It seems as if it were there a couple of years ago, but now it has left the building.


I know that feeling, at our age it is not long before it as all an uphill struggle.

It will not take you long before you get used to the new Flippy Flappy things and are zooming down the hills on your new Mid Life Crisis mistress. :wink:
Keith Edwards
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Re: My New Bike

Postby [XAP]Bob » 5 Mar 2016, 1:49pm

barrym wrote:
Mick F wrote:
The only way to get up to 115" is to fit a bigger chainwheel with the 11t .............. but it would need a 70t chainring! :shock:
Other option is to get a Capreo hub. They go down to 9t so I could get away with only 56t maybe.



How about a Schlumpf? Isn't that just what they are designed for? Think I've seen them mentioned on Moultons.

Never mind the cost, you can't put a value on getting it right[WINKING FACE]

I have a Schlumpf HSD on the Raptobike - brilliant little device!
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Re: My New Bike

Postby hercule » 5 Mar 2016, 5:28pm

re the gearing issue, on my AM as I said a 62T ring is the biggest I can fit - but I also needed a widget (available from Moulton) to fit the braze on mech further back on the mount. With the two Ultegra mechs I've tried, double and triple, that limits the size of the smallest ring to about 38-39T. The curve of the outer plate of the mech also has a smaller radius than that of the chainring, so that's another limiting factor.

One thing I didn't foresee was the chain rubbing on the upper strut of the rear triangle (the "seat stay") when in the smallest cog. I'd originally gone for the 62T ring so that I could replace the original 7-speed Dura Ace hub with 9-10-11T sprockets with something a bit more future proof using a standard Shimano 9 speed cassette with an 11T smallest sprocket. Turned out it wasn't small enough, I had to fit the wheel a little out of the dropouts to avoid the stay being (eventually) cut in two. I then managed to get via eBay a Moulton specific Hope hub with a 10T sprocket and it has worked absolutely fine since. I've fitted my own choice of bigger sprockets so hopefully as I don't ride any appreciable distance in top gear the set up should be reasonably robust and replaceable as the sprockets wear.

Currently it's set up as a 57/42T double with an 10-32T 9 speed cassette. Perhaps a bit lacking in the top end but I have always been a spinner. I use a short cage Deore XT mech and even with tiny 17" wheels there's plenty ground clearance. On the other hand the Deore long cage rear mech on my Trice with 20" wheels will probably hit the ground if I ever get a puncture when in bottom gear!
Last edited by hercule on 6 Mar 2016, 2:14pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Mick F
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Re: My New Bike

Postby Mick F » 6 Mar 2016, 12:35pm

Thanks for that info regarding the "seatstay" being damaged by the chain using a 62t.
Just been looking at mine, and even with the 58t, the chain is very close indeed.

Playing about, I lifted the chain off the top of the 58t a good half-inch but it didn't seem to touch, but that's just playing. No doubt dynamically it could be quite different.

I can certainly see your point! :shock:
Mick F. Cornwall

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Re: My New Bike

Postby fausto copy » 6 Mar 2016, 7:50pm

Mick F wrote:Rohloff is the way ahead.


Can someone help me up off the floor please? :lol: