New words/vocab on this forum, these fora, forae, forums, chatboards..

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mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 12 May 2020, 1:19pm

World at One ( today)

Zombie Jobs

those jobs with the employees at the moment on furlough which wont be there when furlough ends

mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 12 May 2020, 5:03pm

The Académie Française, the body established in 1635 to decide on matters concerning the French language, has ruled that Covid-19 is feminine. ‘La Covid-19’ is now preferred to ‘le Covid-19’.

b********y women!

Cyril Haearn
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Cyril Haearn » 21 May 2020, 8:59am

Parkton, related to morton

Vast numbers of people just went to Devon and Cornwall, the car parks were full so hundreds of mortons parked illegally on yellow lines all the way from Woolacombe to Morthoe

Parking wardens came close to running out of tickets but managed to record all the offences. Shame the fines are so low
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mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 21 May 2020, 12:13pm

Butch-Lesbian

I turned on my radio and was tuned to the end of a show on some thing or other LBGT? on Radio 4. What I gathered is they are not women who want to be men, ie in the wrong body ( transgender ) but not normal women. but .... Its all getting complicated? ( if you detect a bit of sarcasm, you wouldnt be completely wrong). All these labels :roll:

I clearly dont live in the same world where these people inhabit & their concerns, anxieties and worries. hmm maybe I aint human. I always felt "different".....

Cyril Haearn
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Cyril Haearn » 21 May 2020, 2:52pm

Stealth camping

Wild camping, illegal camping, not allowed in some jurisdictions
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mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 18 Jun 2020, 12:23pm

micro-aggression

The way that dumb mute statues offend onlookers eg Colstons or Cecil Rhodes or Churchill or....... and thus have to be torn down


If the real mass of black and Asian people in this country were consulted, as opposed to an unrepresentative (though often very eloquent) set of activist-journalists who make this cause credible, it would be obvious these mute, lifeless effigies are not experienced as a ‘micro-aggression’, a notion that sounds frivolous to anyone who experienced the racial animus of earlier decades.


https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/the-statue-topplers-are-obsessed-with-white-men-and-white-history

Mike Sales
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Mike Sales » 18 Jun 2020, 12:41pm

mercalia wrote:micro-aggression

The way that dumb mute statues offend onlookers eg Colstons or Cecil Rhodes or Churchill or....... and thus have to be torn down


If the real mass of black and Asian people in this country were consulted, as opposed to an unrepresentative (though often very eloquent) set of activist-journalists who make this cause credible, it would be obvious these mute, lifeless effigies are not experienced as a ‘micro-aggression’, a notion that sounds frivolous to anyone who experienced the racial animus of earlier decades.


https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/the-statue-topplers-are-obsessed-with-white-men-and-white-history



You should read this article by David Olusoga, an intelligent and articulate historian and broadcaster on what toppling Colston meant to him.

Why did the tearing down of the statue of Edward Colston in Bristol mean something to me? Why was my heart racing all Sunday afternoon and evening? Why did the scenes that played out around Colston’s plinth and at the harbour into which the statue was thrown bring me – during a phone call to another black Bristolian – to the verge of tears? I can begin to explain why by describing my experience of first moving to Bristol.


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/11/i-shared-my-home-with-edward-colston-for-more-than-20-years-good-riddance

The people toppling Colston into the harbour did not all seem to be journalist activists! Other would be defenders of Colston have described them in completely other words.
Last edited by Mike Sales on 18 Jun 2020, 12:58pm, edited 1 time in total.

jgurney
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby jgurney » 18 Jun 2020, 12:56pm

To avoid thread hijack, the debate over statues rather than neologisms continues at: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=138596

jgurney
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby jgurney » 18 Jun 2020, 1:17pm

mercalia wrote:Butch-Lesbian

Not really new - that has been around since the 1970's. Perhaps an approx English equivalent of the US 'bar dyke' or 'bull dyke'. A lesbian who either actaully does, or is perceived to, adopt various features of the stereotypical masculine role in her social and/or personal relationships (e.g. being the household's main earner while her partner earns significantly less, or relating to men in ways that observers regard as more typical of friendships between men).

jgurney
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby jgurney » 24 Jun 2020, 10:02pm

I'd like to see some neologisms coined to address modern extended family relationships. I for one sometimes find I either have to go into long-winded explanations or be uncomfortably vauge when discussing people such as 'my-wife's-ex-husband's-widow'/'my-stepchildren's-stepmother'. When asked about the boys who someone notices sometimes call me 'grandad' when they know I am not their grandfather, it would be handy to have a simple term for conveying they are the sons of 'man-whose-mother-was-my-girlfriend-for-a-few-months-thirty-years-ago-when-he-was-twelve-and-we-developed-a-pseudo-father-son-relationship that-is still strong-now'. (The boys seem to have started this business of calling me 'grandad' on their own initative and I don't want to quiz them about their motives: I wonder if they just observed similarities between my role and their actual paternal grandfather's role and extrapolated from there).

As for the straightforward term for 'husband-of-(man-who-I-used-to-babysit-and-then-whose-mother-was-my-girlfriend-for-three-months-thirty-five-years-ago-when-he-was-eight-and-we-developed-a-pseudo-father-son-relationship that-is still strong-now-and-his-mother-is-now-my-wife's-and-my-landlady)'?

It would sometimes be handy to have a straightforward way of knowing whether a child referring to 'my mums'/'my dads' means a gay/lesbian household or their straight natural- and step- mothers/fathers. I have come across both younger children using such terms without realising the ambiguity and older ones using them on purpose.

Cyril Haearn
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Cyril Haearn » 24 Jun 2020, 10:06pm

Very complicated :? Informal relatives, chosen/extended family, sort-of family. Uncles and aunts are often 'adopted'

Adopted children like to say, 'my parents chose me, unlike yours' :wink:
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Cyril Haearn
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Cyril Haearn » 29 Jun 2020, 11:40am

A Brazilian lexicographer was working in Ireland, he sought a translation for 'manana', he spent some time explaining what the word meant

'Sorry, we just do not have a word for that degree of urgency', explained his Irish counterpart
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mikeymo
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mikeymo » 2 Jul 2020, 1:34am

foro - ablative singular of forum
foris - ablative plural of forum

It's many decades ago, but I thought that the accusative case was for movement towards, whereas the ablative case was for static position - in, on, or at.

Hopefully there's a Latin scholar who can, and may, tell me if my hazy memory is correct.
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Oldjohnw
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Oldjohnw » 2 Jul 2020, 7:17am

mikeymo wrote:foro - ablative singular of forum
foris - ablative plural of forum

It's many decades ago, but I thought that the accusative case was for movement towards, whereas the ablative case was for static position - in, on, or at.

Hopefully there's a Latin scholar who can, and may, tell me if my hazy memory is correct.


They are both prepositional but I cannot remember how they differ.
John

mikeymo
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mikeymo » 2 Jul 2020, 10:42am

Oldjohnw wrote:
mikeymo wrote:foro - ablative singular of forum
foris - ablative plural of forum

It's many decades ago, but I thought that the accusative case was for movement towards, whereas the ablative case was for static position - in, on, or at.

Hopefully there's a Latin scholar who can, and may, tell me if my hazy memory is correct.


They are both prepositional but I cannot remember how they differ.


I think the ablative is the same as the locative, if a noun doesn't have a locative case. Or something like that. It's ironic that some Latin scholars think this correction:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIAdHEwiAy8

is actually not quite correct. Apparently domum isn't the locative case.
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