Flightless Bird Query.

Use this board for general non-cycling-related chat, or to introduce yourself to the forum.
User avatar
NATURAL ANKLING
Posts: 10572
Joined: 24 Oct 2012, 10:43pm
Location: English Riviera

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 16 Oct 2017, 8:04pm

Hi,
Its the tail that's the striking thing, its horizontal with about two or four feathers not fanned but straight and neat.
Never seen anything like it.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

rjb
Posts: 3396
Joined: 11 Jan 2007, 10:25am
Location: Somerset (originally 60/70's Plymouth)

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby rjb » 16 Oct 2017, 8:28pm

al_yrpal wrote:Could it be a Great Bustard? They bred some on Salisbury Plain?

https://goo.gl/images/iq9Ys0

They can fly

Al


There was one hanging around the litter bins at Stonehenge on my last visit in the summer. Near the stones not the visitor centre. And it was a big bird.
At the last count:- Focus Variado, Peugeot 531 pro, Dawes Discovery Tandem, Dawes Kingpin, Raleigh 20, Falcon K2 MTB dropped bar tourer, Longstaff trike conversion on a Falcon corsa. :D

User avatar
gaz
Posts: 13697
Joined: 9 Mar 2007, 12:09pm
Location: Kent, car park of England

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby gaz » 16 Oct 2017, 9:05pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:... disappeared in to hole ...

Oozlum bird.
Hand wash only. Do not iron.

Ruadh495
Posts: 413
Joined: 25 Jun 2016, 11:10am

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Ruadh495 » 17 Oct 2017, 9:20am

That description sounds like a female pheasant to me. The tail is right, two long straight plumes, and they do have plumage that looks a lot like a bird of prey (especially when they've been squashed).

Ben@Forest
Posts: 1974
Joined: 28 Jan 2013, 5:58pm

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Ben@Forest » 17 Oct 2017, 1:03pm

If it looks a lot like a female pheasant but isn't it could be a (female) golden pheasant. They do have very straight (though not necessarily erect) tails. What's more owners of ornamental birds or estates where they are trying to create a bit of colour do breed or buy them. If you see a male it's unmistakable, not so for the rather more drab female I'm afraid.

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 17194
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Vorpal » 17 Oct 2017, 2:43pm

An escaped turkey?

They are bigger that a pheasant, and can have a wide variety of colours between dark brown and white. The breeds that are close to the wild species are dark brown and only a little bigger than a pheasant. Domestic ones can be twice as big and are usually lighter in colour, or even white. The males also tend to have large, red snoods (that bit of flesh hanging down from a turkeys face), which may not be as obvious on the turkeys that are bred closer to their wild brethren.

They walk and run just like chickens, only they can go a bit faster. They can fly, too, but not very well, and they don't usually fly more than a couple of metres.

They're farmed in the UK, so there are likely to be some escapees around here and there.
Image Attachments
turkey2.jpg
turkey2.jpg (11.98 KiB) Viewed 359 times
turkey1.jpg
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 17194
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Vorpal » 17 Oct 2017, 2:48pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Its the tail that's the striking thing, its horizontal with about two or four feathers not fanned but straight and neat.
Never seen anything like it.

Could it be a peacock that lost its display feathers? They do that this time of year. It can leave a tail like you describe. Some also lose the crest on top of their heads, so they don't really look like peacocks, anymo0re, except for the irridescent blue/green on their necks.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

mnichols
Posts: 1423
Joined: 22 Apr 2013, 4:29pm

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby mnichols » 17 Oct 2017, 6:22pm

I don't want to hijack the post - at worse it's a tangent rather than a hijack, but it's always puzzled me why we don't have wild chickens

Much of our wildlife and birds are escaped captive animals that have bred. Chickens are very numerous, and it would only take one fence to be down on one farm at one time for enough to get out to form a breeding population. They can clearly survive our climate, so why no wild chickens?

Grarea
Posts: 340
Joined: 18 Jan 2017, 9:03am
Location: Truro (ish)

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Grarea » 17 Oct 2017, 6:30pm

mnichols wrote:I don't want to hijack the post - at worse it's a tangent rather than a hijack, but it's always puzzled me why we don't have wild chickens

Much of our wildlife and birds are escaped captive animals that have bred. Chickens are very numerous, and it would only take one fence to be down on one farm at one time for enough to get out to form a breeding population. They can clearly survive our climate, so why no wild chickens?

Foxes?

User avatar
NATURAL ANKLING
Posts: 10572
Joined: 24 Oct 2012, 10:43pm
Location: English Riviera

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 17 Oct 2017, 8:20pm

Hi,
Sounds like a good idea............................just carry a bat on your way home at the weekend.........of a fishing net and scoop one up :mrgreen:
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 17194
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Vorpal » 17 Oct 2017, 9:15pm

mnichols wrote:I don't want to hijack the post - at worse it's a tangent rather than a hijack, but it's always puzzled me why we don't have wild chickens

Much of our wildlife and birds are escaped captive animals that have bred. Chickens are very numerous, and it would only take one fence to be down on one farm at one time for enough to get out to form a breeding population. They can clearly survive our climate, so why no wild chickens?


I've seen what I assumed were wild or escaped chickens in Suffolk. I suppose that they don't last long in the wild, though.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

User avatar
NATURAL ANKLING
Posts: 10572
Joined: 24 Oct 2012, 10:43pm
Location: English Riviera

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 18 Oct 2017, 12:31am

Hi,
Out tomorrow so I will have camera ready :)
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

Ruadh495
Posts: 413
Joined: 25 Jun 2016, 11:10am

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby Ruadh495 » 18 Oct 2017, 10:52am

mnichols wrote:I don't want to hijack the post - at worse it's a tangent rather than a hijack, but it's always puzzled me why we don't have wild chickens

Much of our wildlife and birds are escaped captive animals that have bred. Chickens are very numerous, and it would only take one fence to be down on one farm at one time for enough to get out to form a breeding population. They can clearly survive our climate, so why no wild chickens?

Interesting question. It's quite common to see loose chickens in the road, but I suspect they "escape" back in again at night. Chickens appear to return to their home roost even if set at liberty (like pigeons). As a result it's quite common for them to be left unconfined during the day, without unacceptable losses. Perhaps domestic chickens are so far removed from their wild ancestor (an Asiatic Jungle Fowl) that they can't survive away from humans. Domestic chickens live in flocks of females with sometimes a single male, so to form a viable population several whole flocks would need to escape, including the uncommon males.

Horses and dogs are equally or more domesticated and both of those can form feral populations. Neither survives feral in for long in populated areas though (unlike cats) so perhaps that's the answer; feral chickens can't survive predation by humans.

User avatar
cycleruk
Posts: 5201
Joined: 17 Jan 2009, 9:30pm
Location: Lancashire

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby cycleruk » 24 Oct 2017, 3:01pm

Have you considered one of the "crake" family - Corn Crake ?
There's no such thing as a tailwind.
It's either a headwind, or you're going well.

reohn2
Posts: 35853
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Flightless Bird Query.

Postby reohn2 » 24 Oct 2017, 9:36pm

Si wrote:
Walks and runs but that's it, disappeared in to hole in hedge


was it followed by a coyote?

Who dropped an anvil on its own head.

I'm going for adolescent Pheasant or hen Pheasant
-----------------------------------------------------------
I cycle therefore I am.