Low sugar jam

Use this board for general non-cycling-related chat, or to introduce yourself to the forum.
User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 8637
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby 661-Pete » 29 Jan 2018, 9:42pm

brynpoeth wrote:Only six? :wink:
Would you care to describe them briefly?
I am going to a lecture about bakehouses next week, will report back
'Ordinary' wholemeal; wholemeal with olives; wholemeal with nuts & seeds; sourdough; soda bread; and, as I said: chapatis.

Want any recipes? I think there used to be a 'bread' thread on this forum, but it must have sunk* into the mists of time....

*like our bread if we don't put enough yeast in....
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

brynpoeth
Posts: 10093
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby brynpoeth » 29 Jan 2018, 9:59pm

661-Pete wrote:
brynpoeth wrote:Only six? :wink:
Would you care to describe them briefly?
I am going to a lecture about bakehouses next week, will report back
'Ordinary' wholemeal; wholemeal with olives; wholemeal with nuts & seeds; sourdough; soda bread; and, as I said: chapatis.

Want any recipes? I think there used to be a 'bread' thread on this forum, but it must have sunk* into the mists of time....

*like our bread if we don't put enough yeast in....


Recipes? Please, wholemeal, sourdough
Welsh Bara Brith is another of my favourites, not tried Bara Lawr (seaweed bread) yet
Reminds me of some homemade bread I got for my birthday, very dense and heavy, 50% nuts :D
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

Freddie
Posts: 2237
Joined: 12 Jan 2008, 12:01pm

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby Freddie » 29 Jan 2018, 10:33pm

Vorpal wrote:I buy frozen fruit, and if I remember, I just leave a serving out overnight. If I don't remember, I thaw it in the microwave.

I use the thawed frozen fruit where most people would use jam, on waffles and pancakes, and other things. Though, I don't like anything but butter on toast.
There might be potential in this idea. I could dip into the fruit as needed, but I'd still like a jam rather than just fruit pieces. Do you ever make a puree of the fruit, and have you tried thickening the puree without having to boil the fruit, as per jam?

Away from the jam idea, how do you find the consistency of the thawed fruit compared to fresh?
661-Pete wrote:we make five different varieties of bread here at home (six if you include the chapatis I sometimes make to go with the curry). And not one of them has been anywhere near Chorleywood (says he with snob's hat firmly on head)...
Chorleywood bread, a bit like chewing on an old sports sock; rumoured to be behind the bloating many get eating modern bread too.

Is it difficult to make you own bread, do you do it in a machine or by hand? I like the idea of sourdough, but I seems something of a dark art, maintaining the starter and whathaveyou.
Last edited by Freddie on 29 Jan 2018, 10:46pm, edited 2 times in total.

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 16817
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby Vorpal » 29 Jan 2018, 10:45pm

Freddie wrote:
Vorpal wrote:I buy frozen fruit, and if I remember, I just leave a serving out overnight. If I don't remember, I thaw it in the microwave.

I use the thawed frozen fruit where most people would use jam, on waffles and pancakes, and other things. Though, I don't like anything but butter on toast.
There might be potential in this idea. I could dip into the fruit as needed, but I'd still like a jam rather than just fruit pieces. Do you ever make a puree of the fruit, and have you tried thickening the puree without having to boil the fruit, as per jam?

Away from the jam idea, how do you find the consistency of the thawed fruit compared to fresh?

Raspberries work pretty well without pureeing. They are runnier than jam, but not umacceptably so. Strawberries puree well, and if you pour off the juice before pureeing, they make a jam-like consistency. Of course, both strawberries and raspberries retain the seeds. IMO, it's too much work to filter them out, thought I've done it a few times.

Sometimes, with mixed fruits, I use a fruit strainer. It's not much work to get a jammy consistency (though of course not as sticky), and the excess liquid can be saved to use in smoothies, or for flavouring baking.

Bananas or apples pureed in with other fruit can both serve as thickeners. Bananas work better that way, but of course, they also have a stronger flavour.

Compared to fresh fruit, the consistency of the fruit is squishier. Frozen fruit usually has a good, strong flavour. I don't know if it is due to the varieties, or the freezing process, or both.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

Freddie
Posts: 2237
Joined: 12 Jan 2008, 12:01pm

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby Freddie » 29 Jan 2018, 10:53pm

Vorpal wrote:Raspberries work pretty well without pureeing. They are runnier than jam, but not umacceptably so. Strawberries puree well, and if you pour off the juice before pureeing, they make a jam-like consistency. Of course, both strawberries and raspberries retain the seeds. IMO, it's too much work to filter them out, thought I've done it a few times.
...and to think there used to be industry dedicated to making little bits of wood to emulate the seeds in real jam!

What do you think of this as an idea, no cook 'freezer jam':

http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/06/how- ... r-jam.html

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 16817
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby Vorpal » 30 Jan 2018, 10:32am

Freddie wrote:...and to think there used to be industry dedicated to making little bits of wood to emulate the seeds in real jam!
:shock: I had no idea that people would do such a thing

Freddie wrote:What do you think of this as an idea, no cook 'freezer jam':

http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/06/how- ... r-jam.html


My mother used to do that. It worked well with fresh fruit. I prefer to eat fresh fruit fresh. If have lots of it, I usually either bake with it (blueberry pie!), or freeze it for later use, rather than making jam.

I haven't tried it with frozen fruit.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 8637
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby 661-Pete » 30 Jan 2018, 10:33am

Freddie wrote:Is it difficult to make you own bread, do you do it in a machine or by hand? I like the idea of sourdough, but I seems something of a dark art, maintaining the starter and whathaveyou.
Not difficult. The breads which contain yeast, and the soda bread: these never seem to go wrong! We do it by hand. Nothing wrong with using a machine, but it would just be extra clutter in our already overcrowded kitchen. I have never tried one.
brynpoeth wrote:Recipes? Please, wholemeal, sourdough
OK: let's start with the wholemeal: simpler. I'm sure I've posted this before, but no matter.
Wholemeal Bread
These quantities make four cob loaves – as much as will fit in a standard oven, on two baking sheets. Loaves not for immediate use can be frozen. You will need a mixing bowl around 30cm diameter and two baking sheets. If reducing to two loaves, halve all the quantities. But if reducing to one loaf, still use one whole 7g sachet of yeast.
  • 2 Kg strong wholemeal flour (e.g. Waitrose "Canadian & very strong").
  • 1.4 litres warm water (mix half and half boiling and cold)
  • 4 level tsp salt.
  • 2 x 7 g sachets dried yeast (e.g. Allinson "easy-bake").
  • 100ml cooking oil.
Mix flour, salt and yeast in the bowl; then add water and oil. Mix thoroughly, when it begins to 'come together' turn out onto worktop and knead for about ten minutes.
Return dough to bowl, cover with tea-towel and leave to rise in warm place (airing cupboard) for 1 hour.
Knead again for about 1 minute, divide into four loaves, shape into cob shapes and place on greased floured baking sheets. Cover with tea-towels again and return to warm place for another hour to prove.
Heat oven to 200C and bake for ½ hour, until loaves sound hollow when rapped on underside. Cool on wire rack.
Note: an earlier version used less water: 1.2 litres instead of 1.4 - but Mrs P says 1.4 gives a better result.
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 8637
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby 661-Pete » 30 Jan 2018, 1:37pm

For the sourdough (sorry still off-topic but OK'd by OP) - this is more of a hit-or-miss affair and don't expect success every time!

There are two stages: preparing the 'starter' and, up to a week later, making the bread itself. There are many different methods: I have been constantly revising mine. This is what I'm using at present, seems to work the best for me.

For the starter:
  • Organic stoneground rye flour ("Bacheldre Watermill" is good - but see below)
  • Still spring water (any cheapo supermarket brand will do so long as it's not chlorinated - but not tap water).
You will also need a 500ml Kilner jar.
The flour should be reasonably freshly-ground - say within the last six weeks or so. Bacheldre print a milling date on the package. Maybe this is not a good time of year to start - wait until some rye flour from the 2018 harvest is in.

Day 1: Mix together 25g flour with 50ml water in a bowl, cover with clingfilm and leave in warm place for 24 hours.
Day 2: Add another 25g flour and 50ml water, mix in, cover and leave another 24 hours.
Day 3: Add another 50g flour and 100ml water, mix in, cover and leave another 24 hours.
Day 4: Pour away half the mixture, add another 50g flour and 100ml water, mix in, cover and leave another 24 hours.
At this stage, the mixture should be fizzing away nicely. If it is not, repeat step 4 until it is. If no fizz within the week, your starter has probably failed - throw it away and start over.
Once your starter has got going, transfer to a kilner jar (not a screw-top jar) and keep in the fridge. It will stop fizzing and separate into two layers, with a vinegary smell - but this is quite in order. Once every two weeks or so it should be 'fed' by pouring half away and adding another 50g flour and 100ml water and mixing in - return to the fridge after 24 hours. If you do this your starter will last almost indefinitely.

For the bread. (makes two loaves)
  • 50 ml starter (see above).
  • 1Kg strong wholemeal flour (again, Waitrose 'very strong' works well)
  • 100g strong white flour
  • ½ tsp caraway seed (optional)
  • 700 ml warm water (tap water will do this time)
  • 30 ml vegetable oil
  • 2 level tsp salt.
Begin this the evening before. Mix the starter with 200g of the wholemeal flour and 100ml water, leave in a bowl covered with clingfilm overnight.
Next day, add all the remaining ingredients except the salt, mix well and start to knead. As soon as the dough 'comes together' add the salt, knead for 10 minutes. Return to bowl, cover with clingfilm and a teatowel, and leave in warm place to rise for....
Ah there's the rub. How long it takes to rise will depend on how vigorous your starter is - and the vigour of the starter may well change over the months to come. Rising will at any rate be slower than for yeast bread: I have found that it can be anything from three to six hours. The dough should at least double in size - on a good day it rises above the rim of our 29-cm bowl. But it doesn't have to.
Once it has done enough rising, knead again for 1 minute, shape into two loaves, put on baking sheets and leave to prove for about 70-90 minutes - this stage should be much shorter than the first rising. Then bake for ½ hour at 200C (as for wholemeal).

Good luck with this one!
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

dodger
Posts: 621
Joined: 28 Jan 2007, 9:33pm
Location: East Cornwall

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby dodger » 2 Feb 2018, 9:12pm

A company called Wholearth used to sell lower sugar jam. They used apple concentrate and I found it delicious. Haven't looked for it recently because we make our own and just use less sugar.

User avatar
bigjim
Posts: 3049
Joined: 2 Feb 2008, 5:08pm
Location: Manchester

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby bigjim » 2 Feb 2018, 10:29pm

I watched a program on sugar production once. They just broke down the sugar cane and produced pure white sugar. They added nothing to it. It was just Sugar Cane. Pretty natural I would have thought. It was the Hector Bluemel something chap who presented it. Evidently the human body treats sugar whether from fruit, honey or cane just the same. Sugar is sugar.
My old Plum tree gives me at least 200 plums every year that we turn into Jam. We use a miniscule amount of sugar. No Pectin. I don't think Pectin is that good for you. It keeps quite well but I go through it at a fair rate. It can be quite tart and runny but I enjoy it. Sometimes you will find a cap of white mold at the top of the jar. I just spoon it off and it is fine.
Nothing left to prove.

ian burt
Posts: 138
Joined: 6 Feb 2007, 11:19am

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby ian burt » 16 Feb 2018, 4:48pm

Hi Everybody (in the voice of Dr Nic)

The lowest sugar content will be fruit spread as previously suggested but it is very expensive. Waitrose used to do some good ones and Holland and Barrett do some, 'Diabetic' jams are not recommended even for diabetics as they can give you the runs.

Ian

cotterpins
Posts: 142
Joined: 6 Apr 2016, 9:38pm

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby cotterpins » 23 Mar 2018, 7:54pm

I use an Essex-made jam and marmalade. It is set [or whatever] using grape juice! I also use a French fruit spread, both are manufactured without sugar or it appears without sweeteners!

cotterpins
Posts: 142
Joined: 6 Apr 2016, 9:38pm

Re: Low sugar jam

Postby cotterpins » 23 Mar 2018, 8:09pm

Low sugar jams would give you the runs . . . but like everything it life moderation appears to be the key! When the wife observed that these preserves are a little expensive, I pointed out that we can have two jars for the price of a pint of beer/or a gin an tonic [down 'ere in the Sarf].
It's a matter of choice and what your pocket can stand. My sense of value goes out of the window when it comes to all the gift shops and tea rooms in stately homes and museums, etc. I leave them well alone!