Wood Burners

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Ben@Forest
Posts: 1990
Joined: 28 Jan 2013, 5:58pm

Re: Wood Burners

Postby Ben@Forest » 21 Jan 2019, 6:13am

brynpoeth wrote:Coal or wood firing creates sparks, unfortunately there are lots of trees beside the line, oil firing is 'safer' :wink:


Long, dry grass would catch fire easier. If they managed it without trees they'd need regular mowing. I've been told that in the days of steam the rail companies did have mowing gangs (I'm prepared to be shot down as I've not read that!).

Of course there'd be fewer leaves on the line!

pwa
Posts: 10453
Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: Wood Burners

Postby pwa » 21 Jan 2019, 6:17am

I think we are reaching a point where there is no such thing as "waste wood" from manufacturers using timber. Offcuts are just a resource with another purpose. My own fuel is mostly offcuts.

When larch is felled in the South Wales valleys you get regrowth of some larch mixed in with lots of birch and the odd oak and other species.

Bonefishblues
Posts: 6864
Joined: 7 Jul 2014, 9:45pm
Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Wood Burners

Postby Bonefishblues » 21 Jan 2019, 8:15am

brynpoeth wrote:
Ben@Forest wrote:
Bonefishblues wrote:Conifers are no use for burning - too much resin.


Half of Europe uses softwood for burning - in terms of calorific value most softwood is about 70% of that of most hardwoods; but it's still a good product.

There's a bit of hardwood snobbery about, probably mainly because vendors always promote 'seasoned hardwood'.

The best quality, even for burning, -1
Surely there is plenty of waste wood, pallets, wood from demolished buildings, offcuts

Often treated with toxic substances. Not a good idea.

I expect I will also be told I am wrong here :lol:

Ben@Forest
Posts: 1990
Joined: 28 Jan 2013, 5:58pm

Re: Wood Burners

Postby Ben@Forest » 21 Jan 2019, 8:54am

brynpoeth wrote:
Ben@Forest wrote:There's a bit of hardwood snobbery about, probably mainly because vendors always promote 'seasoned hardwood'.

The best quality, even for burning, -1
Surely there is plenty of waste wood, pallets, wood from demolished buildings, offcuts


Not quite sure what you mean about best quailty. If you are growing a stand of timber then lower quailty thinnings are more likely for the firewood or chip markets, and as the stand matures the better quality and obviously bigger timber goes into roof trusses or floor planking.

You can't grow a stand of commericial timber without thinning to favour the better trees. But the smaller diameter thinnings are ideal for firewood - there's less processing cost for a start.

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Paulatic
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Location: 24 Hours from Lands End

Re: Wood Burners

Postby Paulatic » 21 Jan 2019, 9:04am

Bonefishblues wrote:[
Often treated with toxic substances. Not a good idea.

I expect I will also be told I am wrong here :lol:


OK I think you’re wrong. If you’d replaced often with some then you’d have been correct.

If they are stamped MB then probably best not to burn. Most cheap pallets are KD ( kiln dried) or DB ( debarked)
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pete75
Posts: 11815
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Wood Burners

Postby pete75 » 21 Jan 2019, 9:13am

Ben@Forest wrote:
Bonefishblues wrote:Conifers are no use for burning - too much resin.


Half of Europe uses softwood for burning - in terms of calorific value most softwood is about 70% of that of most hardwoods; but it's still a good product.

There's a bit of hardwood snobbery about, probably mainly because vendors always promote 'seasoned hardwood'.


Some soft wood is a better all round firewood than many hardwoods. Have been using some well seasoned Yew and it seems to produce a lot of heat as well being slow burning. Not all softwoods are soft though. The hardest wood available is a softwood and the softest is a hardwood.