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Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 4 Oct 2019, 9:34pm
by francovendee
Cugel wrote:
mumbojumbo wrote:1.Avoid professionals if possible
2.Read the poem,If,by Kipling
3.Read a good book
4.Limit use of narcotics
5.Exercise mind and body
6.Tell parents to avoid dementia.
7.Drink moderatley
8.Do gardening for self or others
9 Place needs of others before your own
10.Seek out good music and listen eg.Sibelius.Bob Dylan,John Coltrane


You were doing all right 'til No. 3. Many books said to be good by goodbook judges turn out to be tedious drones. I was once recommended to read "The Fountainhead" and "Atlas Shrugged" by that Aynal Randy person. Gaw, they're tedious (and very silly indeed).

Then you got to No. 9 - a good recommendation or not, depending on who is included or excluded from "others". I feel it will be maddening to put the needs of Trumpet or BoJoklown before my own (and everyone else's, which would be part of the "deal" with them gharks. Yes).

No. 10 wouldn't be so bad if only you'd said "Bob Dylan but only Blood on The Tracks".

Cugel, also a bit wary of Kipling reads, which are often the literary equivalent of Kipling "cakes". Sweet & sickly & tasting queer, like Olde English Spangles past their sell-by date.

Spangles! I'd forgotten those, they always did taste a bit queer. I preferred Refreshers.

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 20 Oct 2019, 8:41pm
by brynpoeth
Cycling is good for mental health! I find I can think clearly while tootling along, just need to write my thoughts down and act on them

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 20 Oct 2019, 10:02pm
by Cugel
brynpoeth wrote:Cycling is good for mental health! I find I can think clearly while tootling along, just need to write my thoughts down and act on them


If your write down your thoughts as you cycle along, you may find yourself in the gutter or even at the bottom of a drystone wall with blud on it (yours). Why not instead go along dictating your thoughts into a bar-mounted recorder? This would also be an opportunity to out-gizmo the other cyclists, which is very important apparently.

Cugel

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 20 Oct 2019, 10:07pm
by PDQ Mobile
[quo
Cugel wrote:
Cugel, also a bit wary of Kipling reads, which are often the literary equivalent of Kipling "cakes". Sweet & sickly & tasting queer, like Olde English Spangles past their sell-by date.


Dare I suggest "The Bridge Builders" on a teeming wet and dark Welsh night.
Certainly its flavour is unusual.

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 9:01am
by brynpoeth
The poems of R S Thomas are good for descriptions of life somewhere like Brechfashire, perhaps Cugel could compare and contrast them with the writings of Caradoc

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 9:25am
by Cugel
PDQ Mobile wrote:[quo
Cugel wrote:
Cugel, also a bit wary of Kipling reads, which are often the literary equivalent of Kipling "cakes". Sweet & sickly & tasting queer, like Olde English Spangles past their sell-by date.


Dare I suggest "The Bridge Builders" on a teeming wet and dark Welsh night.
Certainly its flavour is unusual.


Wot bridge builders are these? I googled and got a thousand of them!

Cugel

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 9:32am
by PDQ Mobile
Cugel wrote:
PDQ Mobile wrote:[quo
Cugel wrote:
Cugel, also a bit wary of Kipling reads, which are often the literary equivalent of Kipling "cakes". Sweet & sickly & tasting queer, like Olde English Spangles past their sell-by date.


Dare I suggest "The Bridge Builders" on a teeming wet and dark Welsh night.
Certainly its flavour is unusual.


Wot bridge builders are these? I googled and got a thousand of them!

Cugel

It is a (shortish) story and allegory by Kipling.
Unusual for its day and I thought it might intrigue you.
(Available in digital form Google tells me)

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 9:33am
by Cugel
brynpoeth wrote:The poems of R S Thomas are good for descriptions of life somewhere like Brechfashire, perhaps Cugel could compare and contrast them with the writings of Caradoc


Collected Poems ordered. The ladywife, who is a consumer of vast reams of poetry, will parse the tome for gems. If she stamps the libram with her approval-seal I will also read, although I confess to finding most poetry .... can't think of the right word. :-)

Cugel

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 9:39am
by reohn2
Cugel wrote:
brynpoeth wrote:The poems of R S Thomas are good for descriptions of life somewhere like Brechfashire, perhaps Cugel could compare and contrast them with the writings of Caradoc


Collected Poems ordered. The ladywife, who is a consumer of vast reams of poetry, will parse the tome for gems. If she stamps the libram with her approval-seal I will also read, although I confess to finding most poetry .... can't think of the right word. :-)

Cugel

I don't read much poetry,when I do it's usually modern (dnot keen on rap though).I have a bash at writing some,which is mostly crap,but it helps with my mental equilibrium :D

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 9:42am
by brynpoeth
Another poetry tip
Lisel Mueller, she was born in Hamburg, emigrated to the US, won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. In English
'In the new language, everyone spoke too fast. Eventually we caught up'
Just like learning Welsh :wink:

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 10:10am
by Audax67
Try working out the combination of router bits needed to produce a picture-frame-style moulding and the sequence in which to use them. Then rout 12 metres of the stuff, retaining your fingers. That's my current puzzler.

Oh - you have to make the router table first.

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 12:29pm
by Cugel
Audax67 wrote:Try working out the combination of router bits needed to produce a picture-frame-style moulding and the sequence in which to use them. Then rout 12 metres of the stuff, retaining your fingers. That's my current puzzler.

Oh - you have to make the router table first.


Now then, now then! You'll be making your own tablesaw next!

I have a fine Lee Valley Veritas router table, in which resides a huge Australian router of numerous HP. There are also fences, jigs, stops, hold-downs, micrometer adjusters, sliding carriages and all sorts of other gubbins that together make a wondrous machine that can perform all sorts of wondrous cuts. Let us not, either, forget the woodrat, which is an upside down router table (sort of) for cutting many fine joints with absolute precision.

"What's this", you cry! "Are you, Cugel, a woodworker or a machine operative?"

Well, one can make a case that these toolen are "cheating". But in practice, the set-up of the tool as well as it's proper operation takes quite a bit of experience and the associated skills. And the resulting furniture or other wooden thing is well-made instead of a floppity ramshackler. And how long would it take an amateur to learn to accurately cut a complex picture frame moulding with the 5 different hand moulding planes, eh, eh? I am old now and don't have the five years of 5-day weeks of 8 hour days to do the apprenticeship. No.

****
One thing the router table can do is to cut a complex moulding with one complex-shaped bit, as the power of the router is immense and will drive the queer shaped cutters sticking up two inches and a ... bit. One must take more than a single pass, of course. And these router bits can be expensive, so one would need to justify them by making lots of a single picture frame style......

On the other hand, think of the cost of a spindle moulder and it's tooling! Also, its habit of eating an unwary human arm.

Cugel

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 21 Oct 2019, 12:55pm
by reohn2
Audax67 wrote:Try working out the combination of router bits needed to produce a picture-frame-style moulding and the sequence in which to use them. Then rout 12 metres of the stuff, retaining your fingers. That's my current puzzler.

Oh - you have to make the router table first.

Already done some 30 years ago. :)
Tip,try make the moulding as a composite,you can biscuit joint the two or even three peices together later also using the table,before mitring :wink:

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 23 Nov 2019, 8:30am
by brynpoeth
Taking a cruise might be a dream holiday (may one self-cater?), one meets lots of people plusminus?
The cruise ships visit fjords, a bit cramped and narrow, the rocks block out the son, gloaming at noon, solemn music by Greig or Sibelius is played, could be a bit trying for some

Re: Ten mental health tips

Posted: 23 Nov 2019, 10:02am
by Cugel
Here's an interesting wee article. It suggests a link between human fear of their own death and a lurch rightward to feelings of a fearful intolerance, all kept at bay (mentally-speaking) by a desperate seeking for a meaningful identity, which inevitably results in "othering".

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... list-death

"Experiments carried out under the rubric of “terror management theory” – the framework I and my fellow researchers used for understanding these behaviours – corroborate Becker’s account. They illuminate the existential underpinnings of hostility and disdain toward designated outgroups. After being reminded of their mortality (by answering the questions above, being interviewed in front of a funeral parlour, or subliminally exposed to the word “death”), Christians had more favourable impressions of other Christians and more negative impressions of Jews; Germans sat closer to Germans and further away from Turkish immigrants; Iranians were more supportive of suicide bombings; and Americans advocated using nuclear, chemical and biological weapons against countries that posed no direct threat to the US".

Or so goes the theory - but based on some experimental evidence. Mind .... I yam very wary of psychological and sociological "science" as it's often 99% theory and 1% evidence, selected from 1001 other factors that may be influencing the case. Nevertheless .... the observations are grokable - but perhaps only because I often feel many of the rightward-leaning ole reactionary-yet-revolutionary ranters are ranting out of fear of .... something, anything, everything. Their mental health often seems ...... precarious.

But is that just my own prejudice?

Wot U fink?

Cugel