Cutting the grass

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Mick F
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Cutting the grass

Postby Mick F » 8 Aug 2019, 9:50am

Just come in for a sit-down and a cuppa. Grass cutting on a slope is hard work! Out soon to finish off.

Cut this year ......... Mar 29th (first cut of the year) then Apr 13th and 22nd, May 7th and 25th, then 21st June ......... and not done it since until today - 7th cut of the year.

In the past, I've cut it once a fortnight in the summer, but we've hardly had any rain here and what rain we've had has been a deluge, then nothing. The grass just hasn't grown! Not had any proper constant rain since May. Yes, it's rained, but not proper rain that a garden would enjoy.

How are other peoples' lawns, grass and gardens held out?
Mick F. Cornwall

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al_yrpal
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby al_yrpal » 8 Aug 2019, 10:09am

Yes, up here in Devon its the same, havent cut ours for 3 weeks. The only thing to grow have been weeds. Massive apple crop though.

Al
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kwackers
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby kwackers » 8 Aug 2019, 10:25am

Mines slowed down, but it needs cutting weekly although I could stretch it to two.

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fausto copy
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby fausto copy » 8 Aug 2019, 10:29am

We've probably had similar (if not less) rainfall here Mick.
However, I've been cutting the grass every 10 days or so, if only to keep it green!
Otherwise the various weeds/wildflowers give it a different colour; currently the Self-Heal gives a mid-blue/purple tinge to it.

I have just removed some turves down the side of the house which will be sown with a wild-flower hedge mix in the autumn, to extend my wildflower "meadow".

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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby pwa » 8 Aug 2019, 11:33am

It is recommended that you raise the cutting height a little for drought periods, which allows you to take off the tall stuff without stressing the grass plants. You get the neatness without scalping it.

I think the grass has been a little short of moisture, but not like last year. It looks fairly green at the moment and I'd not want to leave it longer than about ten days between cuts.

Oldjohnw
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby Oldjohnw » 8 Aug 2019, 11:46am

Drought? What is drought?
John

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pwa
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby pwa » 8 Aug 2019, 1:00pm

Oldjohnw wrote:Drought? What is drought?

A few weeks back I suppose. Here in South Wales at least. It rained quite a lot in eastern England for some of that time as we had the high pressure zone and they didn't. My Mum's lawn looked like a bit of dodgy Australian grazing, all straw.

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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby rjb » 8 Aug 2019, 1:48pm

Grass here in Somerset is very yellow and straw like. Hardly any rain for a couple of months. The rain we had didn't even fill the water butt to half way.
I have to cut the grass as swmbo insists she doesn't like the spikey weeds which seem to spring up like magic. I have resorted to using the bath water to keep 1/2 a dozen tomato plants and my rhubarb patch happy. Even diverted the down pipe on the roof to drain onto my Rhubarb patch.
Will we get some proper stuff tonight.
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby Psamathe » 8 Aug 2019, 3:57pm

I find often as we get further into the summer the grass needs cutting more for weed control than for cutting the grass itself. Grass seems to stop growing but the weeds seem to keep going. Also the weeds seem far better able to cope with dry weather so as things get drier so the weeds easily outpace the grass.

Ian

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Mick F
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby Mick F » 8 Aug 2019, 5:08pm

Brambles are doing well this year. Long long long tangles of them. Should be good for blackberries maybe.
Thistles doing well too, but I'm not sure what we can do with them!

Apples seem fine, but the quince that was great last year and were prolific, we probably won't get a good crop this year at all.

Been out cutting rowen berries from our big tree this afternoon, and Mrs Mick F has boiled them off and now they're in a jelly bag draining their syrup so she can make some rowan berry jelly. She is the Jam and Jelly Queen! Also brilliant at chutneys and pickles too! :D

I gather that tomorrow will bring weather warnings for wind as well as rain.
Screen Shot 2019-08-08 at 17.07.21.png
Mick F. Cornwall

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cycleruk
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby cycleruk » 8 Aug 2019, 5:16pm

Outside our drive gate is a grassy bank. It's not ours but I and a neighbour keep it neat and tidy with a mow when needed.
There are also some trees which again we keep neat as needed.
The other day I cleared some overhanging branches to above head height and then proceeded to mow the grass. Lastly there is a rough patch, just over a foot square, which I run the mower over to chop the weeds. Next thing I feel a pain in the side of my face and realise I am being attacked by some wasps. A quick retreat, flaying of arms to defend myself, and some pain from 3 stings.
Some time later I go to inspect area and can see what must be an underground nest as the odd wasp emerges from it.
Even a few hours later there is a wasp patrolling about so no standing around for me.
What surprised me was the fact that I must have been there 1/4 of an hour pruning and mowing with no problems.
Maybe a while before the grass gets cut again. :roll:
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby pwa » 8 Aug 2019, 6:13pm

About ten years ago I inadvertently strimmed a wasp nest at work. The noise of a strimmer combined with the use of ear defenders meant I didn't hear the wasps and the first thing I knew about it was the pain of three stings. The good thing to come out of it, apart from the laugh it gave my colleagues, was that it showed me that wasp stings aren't all that painful and are nothing to fear. Unless you have an allergy.

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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby fausto copy » 8 Aug 2019, 8:38pm

Aren't all that painful?????

The ones I've had (and why are they always in three's!) are damn painful indeed.
The pain from my last lot t'other week lasted a good three days and were uncomfortable for a few more.
Maybe these Welsh ones are more venomous. :evil:

kwackers
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby kwackers » 8 Aug 2019, 8:55pm

fausto copy wrote:Aren't all that painful?????

The ones I've had (and why are they always in three's!) are damn painful indeed.
The pain from my last lot t'other week lasted a good three days and were uncomfortable for a few more.
Maybe these Welsh ones are more venomous. :evil:

I think some people just have a low pain threshold.
Wasp stings are unpleasant and I wouldn't go out of my way to get stung but I wouldn't say they were particularly painful, I've certainly I've managed to hurt myself in ways that were far more painful.

Last time I got stung, I was out running during my dinner hour at work. A wasp flew into my mouth, exploded across my teeth into my dry mouth and managed to sting the inside of my lip. Trying to spit out bits of wasp when you've got no spit was probably the worst bit.
It was pretty funny though, my whole lower jaw and face swelled up so that I looked like a spitting image puppet. I had the sort of lips some folk pay thousands for.
Got a great photo of it.

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fausto copy
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Re: Cutting the grass

Postby fausto copy » 8 Aug 2019, 9:37pm

While I agree about differences of pain threshold, I honestly consider myself as having a high one.

A while back I had a serious cycling accident and while in hospital having a dislocated collar bone seen to, the attendant was surprised I had managed to carry on leading my CTC club ride and suffered the pain for a few days before seeking medical attention.
Whilst trying to manipulate it into some sort of shape, he said that my injury was similar to what professional motor-bike racers and rugby players receive and said that by now they're usually screaming in pain and crying their eyes out. :lol:

Whilst my wasp stings weren't quite in that category, I confess that they are bl**dy painful to me.
And I certainly wouldn't like to contemplate what you went through.
Perhaps it's you that really is the tough guy. :wink:

Having discovered my ground-nesting wasps are still in residence, I'm putting off delving near them until they've hopefully scarpered in late autumn. :roll: