Fungi identification

Use this board for general non-cycling-related chat, or to introduce yourself to the forum.
User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 9121
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 15 Sep 2019, 6:36pm

Cugel wrote:There's even a small coral fungus for Tangled.
I think your 'coral fungus' is actually Yellow Stags-horn, Calocera viscosa, which is not a true coral fungus, instead it is one of the so-called 'jelly fungi' (and indisputably inedible of course!).
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

User avatar
Cugel
Posts: 2478
Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 11:14am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 15 Sep 2019, 9:22pm

661-Pete wrote:
Cugel wrote:There's even a small coral fungus for Tangled.
I think your 'coral fungus' is actually Yellow Stags-horn, Calocera viscosa, which is not a true coral fungus, instead it is one of the so-called 'jelly fungi' (and indisputably inedible of course!).


You may well be right. These are the insights and corrections one seeks.

I read recently that those who are familiar with the science relating to fungi estimate that there are something like 90% of fungal items as yet undiscovered or wrongly included in an extant classification niche. How one makes such an estimate I don't know ........

Cugel

brynpoeth
Posts: 11020
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby brynpoeth » 17 Sep 2019, 5:57am

Right queer and interesting organisms
Please to post the Welsh names too :wink:
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

Tangled Metal
Posts: 5688
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 8:32pm

Re: Fungi identification

Postby Tangled Metal » 17 Sep 2019, 8:20am

Aren't true coral fungi slightly branched at the ends? Plus the one I took was shiny on the sides. Or the flash certainly reflected well off the sides of the one I snapped.

User avatar
Cugel
Posts: 2478
Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 11:14am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 23 Sep 2019, 4:34pm

A lichen today - in super close-up.

Baeomyces roseus (1).jpg

Baeomyces roseus (2).jpg

Baeomyces roseus (3).jpg


I believe this to be Baeomyces roseus but correct me if I'm wrong. It was growing on soil and slate mix along the edge of a Fforest Brechfa logging track.

In the middle pic, the out-of-focus blur at the top of the pic is the ladywife's forefinger nail. Those pink mushrooms erupting from the grey-green lichen are teeny-weeny. The clever Olympus TG4 microscope mode manages to be just that.

Cugel

peetee
Posts: 1368
Joined: 4 May 2010, 10:20pm

Re: Fungi identification

Postby peetee » 23 Sep 2019, 5:49pm

pwa wrote:In the news today, a Welsh mushroom hunter.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-49687905


I think I know where that is. A couple of years ago we were on holiday in South Wales and did a popular walk in Brecon. We took some photos of what we found just off the trail and, as described, it was like a storybook enchanted scene. I love to see fungi but have no idea what is what.
Current status report:
Latter side of fifty and feeling less than nifty.
Too many bikes on pegs and too few miles in the legs.

User avatar
Cugel
Posts: 2478
Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 11:14am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 23 Sep 2019, 6:13pm

peetee wrote:
pwa wrote:In the news today, a Welsh mushroom hunter.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-49687905


I think I know where that is. A couple of years ago we were on holiday in South Wales and did a popular walk in Brecon. We took some photos of what we found just off the trail and, as described, it was like a storybook enchanted scene. I love to see fungi but have no idea what is what.


Not 200 yards from them little pink lichen items was a patch of them penny buns but long past their best.

I've tasked the ladywife with spotting in the woods for fungi, employing a £12 set of 'noculars with which to peer from the logging tracks or other pathways. She spotted some enormous brown summicks in a distant glade, which turned out to be a dozen or thereabouts of those huge brown items but got to the semi-rotted stage of late development, with slug and worm-bite; and a rather slimy aspect.

It may have been ideal conditions for the penny buns this year as we've seen quite a few - but well past their best so not worth picking.

Here are a few more strange characters of Fforest Brechfa:

Tricholoma vaccinum-1.jpg
All stalk an' naa cap

Russula emetica-1.jpg
About to get munched

Sep 12 fungi-20.jpg
Fungi startrekii

LLwndrissi fungi 14-9-11.jpg
Fungi eats fungi

Sep 12 fungi-8.jpg
The fungi muncher


Cugel

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 9121
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm
Location: Sussex

Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 23 Sep 2019, 7:05pm

Cugel wrote:Here are a few more strange characters of Fforest Brechfa:
Image
This first one, which you have labelled Tricholoma vaccinum-1.jpg (incorrectly, I think) could well be a specimen of Battarrea phalloides as my best guess. This is a very rare fungus indeed in Britain, I have certainly never seen one. A pity you didn't get a picture of the underside of the 'cap' (it has no gills) nor of the base of the stem (it has a volva like A. phalloides). If I'm right, well spotted!

Despite its similar name to the Death Cap, it is not said to be poisonous, though indisputably inedible!

Incidentally, if I'm right, this is a protected species under the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981, schedule 8 - so don't go picking 'em.
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

User avatar
Cugel
Posts: 2478
Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 11:14am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 23 Sep 2019, 10:05pm

661-Pete wrote:
Cugel wrote:Here are a few more strange characters of Fforest Brechfa:
Image
This first one, which you have labelled Tricholoma vaccinum-1.jpg (incorrectly, I think) could well be a specimen of Battarrea phalloides as my best guess. This is a very rare fungus indeed in Britain, I have certainly never seen one. A pity you didn't get a picture of the underside of the 'cap' (it has no gills) nor of the base of the stem (it has a volva like A. phalloides). If I'm right, well spotted!

Despite its similar name to the Death Cap, it is not said to be poisonous, though indisputably inedible!

Incidentally, if I'm right, this is a protected species under the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981, schedule 8 - so don't go picking 'em.


You may be right but the Battarrea description from your Wiki link says it's a species of desert or very dry places. Brechfa is far from a dry spot! :-) There were two others nearby in a more mature condition. I think they're the same type but ..... ?

Tricholoma vaccinum-2.jpg

P9020648.jpg


I don't pick any of the fungi I discover these days - although I may try some spore prints in future, perhaps only of the more common variety. At the moment various russulas are most common in Brechfa.

Cugel

brynpoeth
Posts: 11020
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby brynpoeth » 24 Sep 2019, 5:08am

Perhaps you could put a ruler in the photos so we can see how big they are
How do they smell, should one be wary of smelling them?
Where do they grow, wet, shaded, sunny places, on dead trees?
Whatabout the Welsh names?

Hoping to provoke Cugel into making a long post :wink:
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

User avatar
Cugel
Posts: 2478
Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 11:14am

Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 24 Sep 2019, 9:46am

brynpoeth wrote:Perhaps you could put a ruler in the photos so we can see how big they are
How do they smell, should one be wary of smelling them?
Where do they grow, wet, shaded, sunny places, on dead trees?
Whatabout the Welsh names?

Hoping to provoke Cugel into making a long post :wink:


I never make long posts, nor am I ever provoked.

Now, I must take issue with your remarks and explain that [3000 word bad-tempered post truncated in case a reader gets bored to death or even eye-ache - the forum tedium-monitor].

The traditional scale indicator is a small coin in the fungi photos, apparently. As to sniffing them - it can be difficult at my age to get the conk that low to the ground without accidently pushing it into the murk; or going faint when scrambling back up on to one's feet. It seems unlikely that the miasma of the mushroom could lead to any harm, though.

There is the school-toilet smell of the phallus impudicus (stinkhorn) that might cause a faint even without standing up too quick, mind. But who wants stinkhorn cacka on their nozzle? It would become tedious swatting off the consequent insistent cloud of flies. Also, a rozzer coming across a stinkhorn sniffer might become confused about the incident, believing it to be some sort of countryside sexual offense then arresting the innocent fungi-obsessive on a charge of unnatural conduct or even perversion.

stinkhorns.jpg


Cugel

PDQ Mobile
Posts: 2904
Joined: 2 Aug 2015, 4:40pm

Re: Fungi identification

Postby PDQ Mobile » 24 Sep 2019, 1:45pm

Many years ago on a Continental fungus foray with experts I discovered the "pigeon's egg" and partly clear jelly filled stage of impudus!
On the expert advice that is was edible it was added to the mushroom pot pourri!

So I can lay claim to having partaken!
I found it unremarkable- surprisingly!

User avatar
cycleruk
Posts: 5204
Joined: 17 Jan 2009, 9:30pm
Location: Lancashire

Re: Fungi identification

Postby cycleruk » 24 Sep 2019, 4:54pm

Posted a couple of these before on the forum:-
mush 2011.jpg

mush 2011b.jpg
mush 2011b.jpg (33.08 KiB) Viewed 105 times

2011 - Discovered in a hedge but on closer inspection was attached to a dead tree.
About two feet across.

Some years later. 2017 - Same growth :-
mush 2017 a.jpg

mush 2017 b.JPG

Now as big as a bike wheel.
But not there this year. :(
There's no such thing as a tailwind.
It's either a headwind, or you're going well.

User avatar
cycleruk
Posts: 5204
Joined: 17 Jan 2009, 9:30pm
Location: Lancashire

Re: Fungi identification

Postby cycleruk » 24 Sep 2019, 4:59pm

On a grass verge:-
mushroom 4.JPG

mushroom 5.JPG

and underneath.
IMG_2520 (Large).JPG

No idea if safe or not ?
There's no such thing as a tailwind.
It's either a headwind, or you're going well.

User avatar
cycleruk
Posts: 5204
Joined: 17 Jan 2009, 9:30pm
Location: Lancashire

Re: Fungi identification

Postby cycleruk » 24 Sep 2019, 5:03pm

Was on a Poplar tree in our garden :-
IMG_2712.JPG

IMG_2713.JPG
There's no such thing as a tailwind.
It's either a headwind, or you're going well.