Fungi identification

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Tangled Metal
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Tangled Metal » 12 Sep 2019, 8:20pm

Food for free is often thought of as a good book for foragers but I've been informed (reliably by a few prior on a bushcraft forum) that the fungi section has a few potentially dangerous mistakes. Do be very careful with eating foraged fungi. Even experts get it wrong and even ID books depend on the user spotting all the features to define three fungi. That's often hit subjective elements to it.

BTW I once heard that every French pharmacist is required to be able to identify edible fungi as part of their training and professional licence. If true that's a great system.

Oldjohnw
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Oldjohnw » 12 Sep 2019, 10:19pm

Cugel wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:IMG_20190819_180930_256.jpg

This?


A puff ball of some kind (scleroderma or lycoperdon).

Cugel


I wondered. Thanks.
John

Cycling and recycling

Oldjohnw
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Oldjohnw » 12 Sep 2019, 10:20pm

Cugel wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:IMG_20190907_141058843.jpg

And this?


Possibilities:

Pholiota destruens
Amanita strangulata
Psathyrella caput-medusae

Cugel


Thanks. I would not have had a clue.
John

Cycling and recycling

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 12 Sep 2019, 10:55pm

Oldjohnw wrote:
Cugel wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:Image

And this?


Possibilities:

Pholiota destruens
Amanita strangulata
Psathyrella caput-medusae

Cugel


Thanks. I would not have had a clue.
No. None of the above. I'd go for a young Parasol: Macrolepiota procera or M. rhacodes. Difficult to be sure until the cap is more open - or if it's found growing with other more mature specimens.
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

PDQ Mobile
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby PDQ Mobile » 12 Sep 2019, 11:17pm

661-Pete wrote:I'd go for a young Parasol: Macrolepiota procera or M. rhacodes. Difficult to be sure until the cap is more open - or if it's found growing with other more mature specimens.


When I saw the pic I also thought Parasol. (But wasnt brave enough to guess/commit)
The thick stem ring is I think visible.
Smell would be a clincher.

Debs
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Debs » 13 Sep 2019, 3:13am

Be careful with those mushrooms! - remember wot happened to Clint:

Image

The Beguiled (1971)

pwa
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby pwa » 13 Sep 2019, 8:55am

Lovely fungi pics everyone.

My advice to Cugel if considering eating what you find is first look up the really poisonous ones you can expect in that location. They will be few in number. Then only eat the safe fungi that seem distinctive. Young ink cap is eaten by some, for example. You don't need to be able to identify the whole range, just the ones you want to eat. Every ecosystem type has its own range of fungi, so that should limit what you need to look at. But go for it. It is interesting and it is free food and with a bit of sensible caution you will be safe.

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 13 Sep 2019, 9:04am

Oldjohnw wrote:
Cugel wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:Image
This?

A puff ball of some kind (scleroderma or lycoperdon).
Cugel

I wondered. Thanks.

I'm not quite sure, depends on its size. If it was fairly large (several inches across) it looks like the Mosaic Puffball, Handkea utriformis aka Calvatia utriformis. Not very common in UK but I have seen it on occasion. As with the Giant Puffball, edible when still wholly white inside (but with usual safety warnings!).

Incidentally, a good site for getting mushrooms identified online is this one:
http://www.wildmushroomsonline.co.uk/
You can register on the site and post your piccies there. I have used it several times. You will quite likely get an ID from the site owner, Geoff Dann, an acknowledged expert. But even he posts a warning about relying on photo IDs for edibility!
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 13 Sep 2019, 9:17am

pwa wrote:Lovely fungi pics everyone.

My advice to Cugel if considering eating what you find is first look up the really poisonous ones you can expect in that location. They will be few in number. Then only eat the safe fungi that seem distinctive. Young ink cap is eaten by some, for example. You don't need to be able to identify the whole range, just the ones you want to eat. Every ecosystem type has its own range of fungi, so that should limit what you need to look at. But go for it. It is interesting and it is free food and with a bit of sensible caution you will be safe.
My advice would be, learn to recognise a few of the well-known edible species like the Cep (Penny Bun or Porcini) and similar Boletes, and stick to those. The vast majority of mushrooms out there are not actually poisonous but would be extremely unpalatable, no matter how you cook them!

Someone mentioned that even the experts can be fooled! Yes that does happen sometimes, but not very often. Doesn't mean you should distrust experts. After all, doctors sometimes get a diagnosis wrong, but that shouldn't stop you going to the doctor at need!

The most celebrated case involved a very common mushroom called Paxillus involutus. Until about 70 years ago, this mushroom was thought to be edible if cooked. Then an eminent German mycologist, Julius Schäffer, died after eating them. He had been eating and enjoying the same species for years beforehand, without ill-effects: evidently the poison is accumulative. More details here. Now the mushroom is listed amongst the "deadly poisonous" species and should definitely be avoided!
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 13 Sep 2019, 9:39am

Eating of these weird forms is not really on my to-do list, for the reasons others have mentioned. Too risky to attempt a definitive ID via a brief visual inspection of only one stage of the beast's growth cycle. One day I may go a bit further and do the spore prints too - but I still won't be eating them.

I did once have a happy late summer collecting field and horse mushrooms that grew in profusion on the gliding field near Chipping. I was obsessed with trying to learn to glide at the time and would arrive very early at the field to help set up things - and to collect a bag of the mushrooms, which had been well-tested in the eating by several others in days and years before. A sort of race developed, won by the pre-dawner collectors. :-)

Here's a few more:

P9020650.jpg


P9020648.jpg


P9020612.jpg


Llyndrissi Aug 29 fungi-2.jpg


Llwydrissi fungi 2-9-19-5.jpg


Cugel

Tangled Metal
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Tangled Metal » 13 Sep 2019, 10:08am

When we visited my grandparents as kids in three right season we would go shrooming. There were some fields near woods and a large, local school. Getting there early you'd possibly get rich pickings. Very competitive with other locals though. You'd try to pick different fields and hope yours had three mushrooms sometimes lucky sometimes not.

Then back home for mushrooms and a fry up. Still very early in the morning. A good walk with the dog and free food. Of course my dad was the only one eating the fungi that wasn't the field mushrooms. Ink caps and other fungi he knew was safe but we didn't trust them.

pwa
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby pwa » 13 Sep 2019, 10:57am

I don't spend enough time wandering around fungi-rich woodland to bother learning what i can and cannot safely eat. But even so I know a few common fungi on sight, and if I had possibly good foraging on my doorstep I think I could quickly become confident with a small range of edible species. One or two rather than a dozen. The ones of most interest would be the ones I would find and identify most easily. And once you have done a positive identification of a species you can go back to the same spot to harvest, time after time, year after year. And if you aren't sure about the identification you leave it.

Identification of fungi is usually narrowed down by habitat type. If it is beneath birch trees it is probably from this list, whereas if it is beneath conifers it is from another list, etc.

Magic mushroom season on the hills of South Wales about now. So I believe. (Pointy tip, spiral in the stem, so they tell me).

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 13 Sep 2019, 11:16am

pwa wrote:Magic mushroom season on the hills of South Wales about now. So I believe. (Pointy tip, spiral in the stem, so they tell me).
That generally happens after you've eaten one... :lol:
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

pwa
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby pwa » 13 Sep 2019, 11:57am

661-Pete wrote:
pwa wrote:Magic mushroom season on the hills of South Wales about now. So I believe. (Pointy tip, spiral in the stem, so they tell me).
That generally happens after you've eaten one... :lol:

I'll have to take your word for that. I wouldn't know about such things. This tea tastes a bit funny....

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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 13 Sep 2019, 3:40pm

This morning's photo crop of fungi taken during the collie walk, which annoys the colles as one cannot easily photograph the fungi whilst simultaneously throwing the stick.

FIrst, an Amanita Rubescens - The Blusher .... probably. Said to be indigestible when raw but good when cooked. Nevertheless, it won't be going in the omlette or even the soup. After all, many of them Amanitas look rather similar.

Banc Du fungi 13-9-8.jpg


Banc Du fungi 13-9-7.jpg


Banc Du fungi 13-9-9.jpg


And another Amanita - Muscaria or Fly Agaric. This one was all on it's todd and huge. Still to open out to the full flat cap and already over 3 inches in diameter i' the dome. I estimate that it would send at least three hippies (or four smaller ones) off with Lucy in the sky.

Banc Du fungi 13-9-10.jpg


The Brechfa forest glades are beginning to sprout mightily of the mushrooms. Different kinds seem to prefer slightly different conditions and times of year. There's been many russulas, still going strong; but the boletus seems to have been and gone, along with various others I can't readily identify. Each dog walk now sees 2 -6 new types appearing. More to follow then. :-)

Cugel