Fungi identification

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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 27 Sep 2019, 3:17pm

cycleruk wrote:Was on a Poplar tree in our garden :-
IMG_2712.JPG
IMG_2713.JPG


A bracket fungi of some kind although I can't find it in any of me books. Also, some books seem to suggest that bracket fungi have pores rather than gills .....

Here's beef steak fungus (fistulina hepatica) just starting that the ladywife photographed yesterday in Fynonne Woods. It's just 40mm across in the photo but will likely grow a lot larger in the next two weeks.

The book suggests it can be eaten when young but soon goes leathery and not-nice. The beefsteak name is due to its appearance (like cut red flesh with red drops of blood dripping out) rather than to it's taste.

CUgel
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Beefsteak fungus top
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Beefsteak fungus underside
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Beefsteak fungus edge

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 27 Sep 2019, 3:39pm

Cugel wrote:
cycleruk wrote:Was on a Poplar tree in our garden :-
IMG_2712.JPG
IMG_2713.JPG


A bracket fungi of some kind although I can't find it in any of me books. Also, some books seem to suggest that bracket fungi have pores rather than gills
Looks like Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus to me - but I can't be sure from the photo (so don't eat it).

Although the term "bracket fungi" refers loosely to the polyporaceae, most of which grow on trees, have pores and very tough bodies, there are many other fungi that grow on trees or dead wood - and lots of them have gills.
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Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 28 Sep 2019, 6:16pm

Today's item plus a couple photographed earlier in the month:

P9281072-Edit.jpg

P9281065.jpg

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I've never seen a mushroom growing out of a beach before! It was at Poppit Sands, about three feet from the edge of the dunes.

The ladywife found the purple item, which she believes is named "The Purple Deceiver".

Cugel

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cycleruk
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby cycleruk » 28 Sep 2019, 8:55pm

Any thoughts on these.
A bit ago near Grasmere.
IMG_1924.JPG
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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 28 Sep 2019, 9:10pm

They're what we call LBMs - "Little Brown Mushrooms". There are rather a lot of those and it takes an expert to sort them out.... :lol:
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 28 Sep 2019, 9:30pm

cycleruk wrote:Any thoughts on these.
A bit ago near Grasmere.
IMG_1924.JPG


That's likely to be honey fungus - common on many fallen tree trunks and branches but also a bane to gardeners as it can eat still-living woody plants, which generally kills them after a bit.

Cycle CP 15-9 fungi-2.jpg


Cycle CP 15-9 fungi-1.jpg


Cugel

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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 30 Sep 2019, 2:28pm

Today's crop, including a perfek specimen of a fly agaric and a very weird-looking bracket fungus.

The recent wet spell has brought out a lot. In the mostly commercial evergreen Fforest Brechfa there seem to be mostly russulas - probably thousands - along with various other types where there's something a bit different in the way of tree species besides spruce and fir.

Llwyndrissi 30_9_19 fungi-3.jpg
A perfect fly agaric lacking only the pixie

Llwyndrissi 30_9_19 fungi-12.jpg
Hairy, drippy and very strange

Llwyndrissi 30_9_19 fungi-15.jpg
A shaggy little item

Llwyndrissi 30_9_19 fungi-21.jpg
Mushroom cake
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Convolvulation!

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 6 Oct 2019, 4:41pm

Well, after a completely fungi-free September here in Sussex :( - the recent wet spell has finally brought some out. Yesterday I picked a fine couple of Horse Mushrooms, enough for a pizza and very nice!

Today we came across these in a field near the railway line:
Parasols 01.jpg

They're Parasol Mushrooms (Macrolepiota procera). Although we've found them at this locality in previous years, I've never seen so many growing in one spot before: literally dozens! They're excellent eating - and we picked some of them - not many - for lunch today. However, I must stress, if you're not entirely familiar with this mushroom, don't eat unless they've been properly identified by someone with experience.
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

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Re: Fungi identification

Postby rjb » 9 Oct 2019, 4:30pm

Washing some somerset mud off the tandem today spotted these tiny Fungi in our lawn. Parrot waxcap approx 1cm diameter and edible according to our Fungi guide. Dont look very appetising though.
waxcap.jpg
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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 9 Oct 2019, 5:22pm

We have a Cep (="Penny Bun" or "Porcino") growing on our front lawn :D . This is definitely a first for us - although various other fungi have popped up there over the years: mostly Fly Agarics, the occasional Horse Mushroom, this is the first time, after nearly 38 years of living here, that we've had a specimen of this much-prized edible fungus actually on our doorstep, so to speak.
IMG_1071_Cep.jpg

As you can see, it's not very big yet: I first spotted it yesterday when it was a mere 'button'. My dilemma is, whether to pick it now or wait for it to grow bigger, and risk it becoming wormy. Of course, it may be wormy already...
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

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Cugel
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby Cugel » 10 Oct 2019, 6:09pm

661-Pete wrote:We have a Cep (="Penny Bun" or "Porcino") growing on our front lawn :D . This is definitely a first for us - although various other fungi have popped up there over the years: mostly Fly Agarics, the occasional Horse Mushroom, this is the first time, after nearly 38 years of living here, that we've had a specimen of this much-prized edible fungus actually on our doorstep, so to speak.
IMG_1071_Cep.jpg
As you can see, it's not very big yet: I first spotted it yesterday when it was a mere 'button'. My dilemma is, whether to pick it now or wait for it to grow bigger, and risk it becoming wormy. Of course, it may be wormy already...


The mycelium that lives below that delicious fruiting body may be just establishing. Perhaps the fruiter should be left to spread its spores around the rest of your garden, in the hope that they alight on other stuff that Cep mycelium enjoys rotting down? In future years you may have a Large Crop, which you could sell to get the funds for three solar panels; or merely consume in an orgy of cep omelettes or garlic-cep on toast.

Around here the fungi is quiescent, with only honey fungus and the rather slug-chewed remnants of russulas about.

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 10 Oct 2019, 6:25pm

Well the decision was taken out of my hands, 'cos I came home this afternoon to find it'd been knocked over. Never mind. It does appear to be a nice firm specimen, free of worms, so we'll cook it tomorrow. Whether we get a chance to go out tomorrow and look for more like it, is doubtful - looks like heavy rain all day.

Have I acquired a 'label' as a solar-panel freak? I wouldn't have thought so. Anyway, we haven't got any - though several of our neighbours sport the things on their rooftops...
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

PDQ Mobile
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby PDQ Mobile » 10 Oct 2019, 6:57pm

Regarding fungi on lawns I spotted these yesterday.
Shaggy Inkcaps.
Nearly nipped over and grabbed a couple.

I have eaten them a couple of times (when very fresh) in the past and found them rather meaty and good.
Alcohol is a definite "no no" as an accompaniment, I am aware.
Strange that?

image.jpg

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661-Pete
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Re: Fungi identification

Postby 661-Pete » 10 Oct 2019, 7:09pm

PDQ Mobile wrote:Regarding fungi on lawns I spotted these yesterday.
Shaggy Inkcaps.
Nearly nipped over and grabbed a couple.

I have eaten them a couple of times (when very fresh) in the past and found them rather meaty and good.
Alcohol is a definite "no no" as an accompaniment, I am aware.
Strange that?
Shaggy Ink-caps (Coprinus comatus) are excellent so long as they are entirely white inside, even down to the tips of the gills. But do not eat them once they have started to turn black.

The 'alcohol problem' actually relates to a different but related fungus: the Common Ink-cap Coprinopsis atramentaria. This, despite its name, is less common than the shaggy ink-cap. Its cap is not shaggy but is radially striated. Recommend you avoid that one - even if you're not going to drink alcohol with it - it's more likely to be confused with poisonous species.
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

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Re: Fungi identification

Postby PDQ Mobile » 10 Oct 2019, 7:21pm

I stand corrected by the mycelium maestro. Thankyou.

I have never eaten ordinary Inkcaps but enjoyed the fresh shaggy ones a few times
The alcohol thing is just lodged in my head as: "inkcaps = no alcohol".

My Philips guide is far away.