** The General Election Thread **

Use this board for general non-cycling-related chat, or to introduce yourself to the forum.
pwa
Posts: 12115
Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby pwa » 8 Dec 2019, 6:46pm

Mick F wrote:PS:
I ask again...............

Where do they plan to plant these millions of trees?

I don't know but I could find thousands of hectares to plant in my region, without losing any prime agricultural land. Your neck of the woods (see what I did there?) is very wooded but there are many places where fairly unproductive land is ready and waiting. Mostly used for very marginal grazing.

Cyril Haearn
Posts: 12939
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Between the woods and the water

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby Cyril Haearn » 8 Dec 2019, 7:02pm

Am I the only one here who loves conifers?
Entertainer, kidult, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we dislike mortons

ambodach
Posts: 944
Joined: 15 Mar 2011, 6:45pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby ambodach » 8 Dec 2019, 7:19pm

Mick I thought it easier to use the name rather than the road number A83. I know the Rest and be Thankful pretty well since I cycled there from my teens and later camped often in a hidden corner which I cannot now identify. There is a nasty bit by Loch Restil where the side winds which appear out of nowhere could blow a cyclist off the road. A bus was blown off a couple of years ago. I still drive it often northbound as if the road is closed due to land slip it is a shorter return to Loch Lomond as opposed to southbound where the return is a long way and the Clyde ferries are off overnight when I often travel. I always start with a full tank of fuel.

roubaixtuesday
Posts: 2922
Joined: 18 Aug 2015, 7:05pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby roubaixtuesday » 8 Dec 2019, 7:23pm

Cyril Haearn wrote:Am I the only one here who loves conifers?


I love conifers.

Just not high density monoculture of them.

reohn2
Posts: 38725
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby reohn2 » 8 Dec 2019, 9:48pm

Debs wrote:With global warming, warmer winters, and the rise and rise of temperature, they should plant millions of banana trees.
Would be appropriate for the post-Brexit Banana Republic Britain, and not to mention banana's being very fashionable in the Art world at present.

:lol: :lol: :lol:
-----------------------------------------------------------
I cycle therefore I am.

User avatar
Cugel
Posts: 3325
Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 11:14am

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby Cugel » 8 Dec 2019, 10:06pm

reohn2 wrote:
Debs wrote:With global warming, warmer winters, and the rise and rise of temperature, they should plant millions of banana trees.
Would be appropriate for the post-Brexit Banana Republic Britain, and not to mention banana's being very fashionable in the Art world at present.

:lol: :lol: :lol:


The whole country has gone bananas and we don't need any more! There are also millions of fruit-loops. Personally I would stick one in t'other in the hope that they'd annihilate each other, with a soft and squidgy plopping sound as they made their way back to the 13th dimension from whence they sprang.

Cugel, getting tired of barmpots, crackpots and crocks of expletive-deleted.

User avatar
Spinners
Posts: 1677
Joined: 6 Dec 2008, 6:58pm
Location: Port Talbot

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby Spinners » 8 Dec 2019, 10:10pm

roubaixtuesday wrote:
Cyril Haearn wrote:Am I the only one here who loves conifers?


I love conifers.

Just not high density monoculture of them.


Fir enough :wink:
Cycling UK Life Member
PBP Ancien (2007)

reohn2
Posts: 38725
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby reohn2 » 8 Dec 2019, 10:38pm

Spinners wrote:
roubaixtuesday wrote:
Cyril Haearn wrote:Am I the only one here who loves conifers?


I love conifers.

Just not high density monoculture of them.


Fir enough :wink:


Leaf it out,yer barking up the wrong tree.
-----------------------------------------------------------
I cycle therefore I am.

francovendee
Posts: 1337
Joined: 5 May 2009, 6:32am

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby francovendee » 9 Dec 2019, 8:28am

PDQ Mobile wrote:
francovendee wrote:
Never short of a good fire though Mick F :D

Warning thread drift.

It's much more though.

There is great changing beauty in trees.
They provide a breaking of wind (refrain from comment please!).
And a purifier of the atmosphere and carbon sink.

Woodland is habitat for a whole myriad of lifeforms and plants.
It is soil improvement; both humus in the top layers and minerals from deeper down.
It is the material from which Cugel makes beautiful things.
It is handles for tools and for even whole houses.
A fair few medicines are derived from trees.
And don't forget Sweet Chestnuts.
And properly seasoned it is a carbon neutral and pretty clean source of energy. It's ain't half hot Mum!


Hedges share much of the above.
It is one difference between Britain and the European Continent. Immediately apparent either on the ground or from the air.
We have kept a lot more of our old hedges.
Partly though the big shelter advantage in a windy climate, I think.


Not true of rural France, hedges galore and lots of woodlands which do get fell and replanted.
The wide variety of wildlife is witness to this, far more than I've come across in the UK.
The pressure on land here is far less, so more areas are just left, this really suits all sorts of creatures, man included. :)

User avatar
al_yrpal
Posts: 8521
Joined: 25 Jul 2007, 9:47pm
Location: Cully
Contact:

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby al_yrpal » 9 Dec 2019, 9:47am

Too true Franco, Britain is vastly overpopulated, we need emigration, not migration.. Loved watching the wild boar in the early morning at our pals place near Auch. Pity the French blast away at birds though.

Al
Last edited by al_yrpal on 9 Dec 2019, 9:58am, edited 1 time in total.
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. What do you do to make a difference?

roubaixtuesday
Posts: 2922
Joined: 18 Aug 2015, 7:05pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby roubaixtuesday » 9 Dec 2019, 9:53am

al_yrpal wrote:To true Franco, Britain is vastly overpopulated, we need emigration, not migration.. Loved watching the wild boar in the early morning at our pals place near Auch. Pity the French blast away at birds though.

Al


You volunteering?

PDQ Mobile
Posts: 3480
Joined: 2 Aug 2015, 4:40pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby PDQ Mobile » 9 Dec 2019, 10:01am

francovendee wrote:
Not true of rural France, hedges galore and lots of woodlands which do get fell and replanted.
The wide variety of wildlife is witness to this, far more than I've come across in the UK.
The pressure on land here is far less, so more areas are just left, this really suits all sorts of creatures, man included. :)

There may be areas of France that I have never travelled through where hedges are more apparent, of course. I have only travelled through the Dordogne once for example and it was at night! I am not very well travelled in the South of France at all although I have been to some of it.


Yet if one crosses the Channel the paucity of hedgerows is immediately apparent.
I wondered for years why i knew I was in France!
What was the salient difference in the (house free) landscapes on either side of the geographically and geologically similar regions?
And the difference is, IMHO, for a great part (maintained!?) hedges or lack of them

There used to be more on mainlsnd Europe, I am told, even down into the Alpine regions but were extensively grubbed out.

England has maintained more hedges and smaller enclosures, though obviously many thousands(?) of miles are lost compared to formally.
As I stated in my post even Northern England is quite distinctive from the air for it's smaller hedge-rowed enclosures compared to ANY part of France I have flow over.

I agree however that France retains a quality of "wide openess" not present in England.
It is after all a good deal larger and has a deal more agricultural land with a similar population.

There are far more extensive tracts of woodland and many small copses.
Bird life and animal life is surprisingly abundant at times. And fish seem to thrive in the often rather "washing powder smelly" rivers.

But I still think England has this "hedged" quality of landscape that the France I know (now) lacks.

There are areas of England where one travels mile after mile after mile on roads bounded by dense hedges.
That is hardly ever the case in the rural France I am familiar with- broadly the NE.

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 48747
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby Mick F » 9 Dec 2019, 10:21am

We have Cornish hedges.
6ft wide at the bottom, 3ft wide at the top, and 6ft tall. Standard design, but it varies of course.
Built of loose stones and soil and let to go natural over the years with grass, weeds, trees etc.
Mick F. Cornwall

User avatar
al_yrpal
Posts: 8521
Joined: 25 Jul 2007, 9:47pm
Location: Cully
Contact:

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby al_yrpal » 9 Dec 2019, 12:25pm

Mick F wrote:We have Cornish hedges.
6ft wide at the bottom, 3ft wide at the top, and 6ft tall. Standard design, but it varies of course.
Built of loose stones and soil and let to go natural over the years with grass, weeds, trees etc.


View blockers, one of the worst aspects of West country roads.

Al
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. What do you do to make a difference?

pete75
Posts: 12959
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: ** The General Election Thread **

Postby pete75 » 9 Dec 2019, 2:00pm

PDQ Mobile wrote:
Hedges share much of the above.
It is one difference between Britain and the European Continent. Immediately apparent either on the ground or from the air.
We have kept a lot more of our old hedges.
Partly though the big shelter advantage in a windy climate, I think.


Hedges are relatively recent in much of rural Britain. They came in with enclosure mostly in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Many preferred the open, pre enclosure landscape. Here's John Clare comparing the landscape of enclosure with that of his boyhood.

Unbounded freedom ruled the wandering scene
Nor fence of ownership crept in between
To hide the prospect of the following eye
Its only bondage was the circling sky
One mighty flat undwarfed by bush and tree
Spread its faint shadow of immensity
And lost itself, which seemed to eke its bounds
In the blue mist the horizon’s edge surrounds
Now this sweet vision of my boyish hours
Free as spring clouds and wild as summer flowers
Is faded all — a hope that blossomed free,
And hath been once, no more shall be