Agriculture

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Paulatic
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Paulatic » 25 Jun 2020, 1:20pm

Cyril Haearn wrote:Perhaps Paulatic could answer a question that has occupied me for many years
How does it feel to be savaged by a dead sheep? :?


If asked "How long should you keep a sheep?" I usually reply until they’ve been dead three days :lol:
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Ben@Forest
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Ben@Forest » 25 Jun 2020, 2:28pm

ambodach wrote:In Shetland I was told that they always had a couple of black fleece sheep in a field so that in the winter it was easier to see where the flock was.


Many years ago l worked in a woodland with a fallow deer population and which was quite surrounded by more urban areas (l mention that because it meant the deer didn't roam that far). One of the bucks was very pale and deliberately wasn't culled because it helped spot the presence of other deer. A year or two later l felt a bit sad when l heard he had been shot.

jimlews
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Re: Agriculture

Postby jimlews » 25 Jun 2020, 2:49pm

Cyril Haearn wrote:Perhaps Paulatic could answer a question that has occupied me for many years
How does it feel to be savaged by a dead sheep? :?


Maggie knew the answer to that one: And Howe!

thirdcrank
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Re: Agriculture

Postby thirdcrank » 25 Jun 2020, 2:53pm

Point of information, it was Dennis "Silly Billy" Healey who coined the phrase.

(I cannot think of any sort of pun here.)

pete75
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Re: Agriculture

Postby pete75 » 25 Jun 2020, 4:12pm

Paulatic wrote:
pete75 wrote:
Paulatic wrote:Supply and demand
The UK production can’t supply what’s required all year around. NZ and Oz can produce it cheaper than us and being on the other side of the world slits in nicely.
Without an EU subsidy the UK will have to
1 pay a subsidy
or Lamb will need to be dearer than it now is
or We can import cheaper meat from elsewhere.
One guess as to how a Tory thinks. They can afford to buy good produce but the rest of the plebs can eat inferior imported food.

Is New Zealand lamb inferior? Doesn't it have to meet UK standards to be sold here? After Brexit it'll still be sold here at the same price. If UK producers can't compete with stuff shipped from NZ without a subsidy perhaps they shouldn't be in business. TBH I don't know why many farmers bother with sheep other than they like having a bit of stock and it's traditional. Only about 6-8 sheep an acre, sometimes less. Much more dosh in furloughing it up for wheat or beet.


Have you bought it and ate it what do you think?
I think I might have had some back in the 70 or 80 and my memory of I as small boney cuts. Yes it will meet EU standards as part of the trade deal with the EU. Having known many NZ shearers who come here and also I know farmers who’ve gone out there then I believe their farm welfare standards are also comparable to ours. Not the impression when I’ve met Oz shearers.
Perhaps after Brexit UK farmers shouldn’t be In business but your last two sentences suggest you need to get out of Lincolnshire a bit more. :)
You might get 6-8 sheep an acre in Lincolnshire but where I worked it was 4 acres per sheep. The Lincolnshire Longwool sheep lost popularity because of a) it’s unwanted fleece and b) it was difficult to keep alive outwith the county. ( I could say any fool of a sheep could live In Lincolnshire :lol: ) Of it’s three cousins, I can think of, Teeswater, Wensleydale, Bluefaced Leicester The first two have made a little comeback from extinction and the number one crossing sheep to get a commercial ewe is the BFLeicester. Also known as a Hexham Leicester native to somewhere a little harder.
Growing wheat or beet isn’t an option. Trees are often the only option and the ones I’m looking at right now were planted for tax dodging reasons and some often not a lot of use to man nor beast Great for off road riding though :)


Yes Of course we we're all bleeding fools in Lincolnshire. Wonder how we managed to produce Newton, Tennyson, invent the tank, build world championship winning F1 cars etc etc not to mention Mrs Thatcher who, whatever else she was, wasn't a fool.

Maybe you have a point though. Charles Kingsley described men from the Lincs fens as having the strength of an ox and the courage of a lion but all too often they have the intellect of the former and the self restraint of the latter.

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Mick F
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Mick F » 25 Jun 2020, 8:07pm

simonineaston wrote:Words fail me: if in the light of what we now know (compared with say a decade or two ago...) about climate change, I simply cannot understand the wisdom in trashing our existing & well-established trade agreements with our nearest neighbours ...........
Late to the party here, and the thread has moved on no doubt.

I'm a supporter of brexit, and have never ever wanted to be part of a European Union or a United Europe or whatever you wish to call the whole idea.
This doesn't mean that I am against trading with Europe or whatever country. The nearer the better for the economic transport of stuff.

It doesn't mean that I agree with a United Europe at all.
Co-operation with every country in the whole world is the way ahead for peace and happiness everywhere.
Mick F. Cornwall

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Paulatic
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Paulatic » 25 Jun 2020, 9:28pm

pete75 wrote:[

Yes Of course we we're all bleeding fools in Lincolnshire. Wonder how we managed to produce Newton, Tennyson, invent the tank, build world championship winning F1 cars etc etc not to mention Mrs Thatcher who, whatever else she was, wasn't a fool.

Maybe you have a point though. Charles Kingsley described men from the Lincs fens as having the strength of an ox and the courage of a lion but all too often they have the intellect of the former and the self restraint of the latter.


My BiL resident of your county for more than 40 yrs I think might agree with Kingsley's observation. Myself I can identify with Cobbett who said
Cold and damp fogs, soaking rains, and dreary, monotonous Lincolnshire fens.
Once I get over the wonder of all that level ground I too find it monotonous I’m obviously a hill man.

Thanks for the reminder of Mrs Thatcher she is another thing which couldn’t thrive in Scotland. :)
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PDQ Mobile
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Re: Agriculture

Postby PDQ Mobile » 25 Jun 2020, 10:37pm

Blink and it's gone!!
In case you missed it. :shock:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-53184638

pete75
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Re: Agriculture

Postby pete75 » 26 Jun 2020, 8:58am

Paulatic wrote:
pete75 wrote:[

Yes Of course we we're all bleeding fools in Lincolnshire. Wonder how we managed to produce Newton, Tennyson, invent the tank, build world championship winning F1 cars etc etc not to mention Mrs Thatcher who, whatever else she was, wasn't a fool.

Maybe you have a point though. Charles Kingsley described men from the Lincs fens as having the strength of an ox and the courage of a lion but all too often they have the intellect of the former and the self restraint of the latter.


My BiL resident of your county for more than 40 yrs I think might agree with Kingsley's observation. Myself I can identify with Cobbett who said
Cold and damp fogs, soaking rains, and dreary, monotonous Lincolnshire fens.
Once I get over the wonder of all that level ground I too find it monotonous I’m obviously a hill man.

Thanks for the reminder of Mrs Thatcher she is another thing which couldn’t thrive in Scotland. :)


A place of which Samuel Johnson said 'The noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees, is the high road that leads him to England.'

If you think Lincs is all flat fens you've obviously never been to the chalk wolds or the limestone areas in the west.
It's stuff like that level ground that keeps people fed though.

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Paulatic
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Paulatic » 26 Jun 2020, 9:27am

pete75 wrote:[

A place of which Samuel Johnson said 'The noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees, is the high road that leads him to England.'

If you think Lincs is all flat fens you've obviously never been to the chalk wolds or the limestone areas in the west.
It's stuff like that level ground that keeps people fed though.


I know the Limestone Cliff area well and do like Market Rasen area.
Do you know if the Lincolnshire Longwool you mentioned earlier were kept/bred on ground like around MR?
The only LL breeder I’ve ever known was from around Lincoln somewhere I can’t remember where. A real character who used to attend Kelso Tup sales and usually guaranteed to bring a smile to the assembled ringside.
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pete75
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Re: Agriculture

Postby pete75 » 26 Jun 2020, 12:04pm

Paulatic wrote:
pete75 wrote:[

A place of which Samuel Johnson said 'The noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees, is the high road that leads him to England.'

If you think Lincs is all flat fens you've obviously never been to the chalk wolds or the limestone areas in the west.
It's stuff like that level ground that keeps people fed though.


I know the Limestone Cliff area well and do like Market Rasen area.
Do you know if the Lincolnshire Longwool you mentioned earlier were kept/bred on ground like around MR?
The only LL breeder I’ve ever known was from around Lincoln somewhere I can’t remember where. A real character who used to attend Kelso Tup sales and usually guaranteed to bring a smile to the assembled ringside.

They almost went the same way as the Lincolnshire curly coated pig and the Lincolnshire Black Horse from which the shire was developed. Kept alive by a few enthusiasts. They, or sheep very like them, would have been on sheep runs all over the county in the years when wool was one of England's most valuable exports and Boston one of the main exporting ports. According to this Lincolns were exported all over the worls so your theory thye can't be raised outside of the county would appear to be wrong. https://web.archive.org/web/20090829115 ... lnlongwool

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Paulatic
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Paulatic » 26 Jun 2020, 1:00pm

pete75 wrote:[
They almost went the same way as the Lincolnshire curly coated pig and the Lincolnshire Black Horse from which the shire was developed. Kept alive by a few enthusiasts. They, or sheep very like them, would have been on sheep runs all over the county in the years when wool was one of England's most valuable exports and Boston one of the main exporting ports. According to this Lincolns were exported all over the worls so your theory thye can't be raised outside of the county would appear to be wrong. https://web.archive.org/web/20090829115 ... lnlongwool


Down to only ten flocks now in Australia :(
Take a look at this Australian Lincoln ewe and lambs and tell me how does that compare to the ones you see about you there.
B2BDA656-F436-462C-B116-381B8DC5ECE3.jpeg
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ambodach
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Re: Agriculture

Postby ambodach » 26 Jun 2020, 7:59pm

Paulatic I think dry stone wall but do not remember a turf top. It was a long time ago.

pete75
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Re: Agriculture

Postby pete75 » 26 Jun 2020, 11:30pm

Paulatic wrote:
pete75 wrote:[
They almost went the same way as the Lincolnshire curly coated pig and the Lincolnshire Black Horse from which the shire was developed. Kept alive by a few enthusiasts. They, or sheep very like them, would have been on sheep runs all over the county in the years when wool was one of England's most valuable exports and Boston one of the main exporting ports. According to this Lincolns were exported all over the worls so your theory thye can't be raised outside of the county would appear to be wrong. https://web.archive.org/web/20090829115 ... lnlongwool


Down to only ten flocks now in Australia :(
Take a look at this Australian Lincoln ewe and lambs and tell me how does that compare to the ones you see about you there.
B2BDA656-F436-462C-B116-381B8DC5ECE3.jpeg

Not so different but fringe over the eyes not so developed but maybe lambing earlier in the season there. Lincoln's were developed by mankind for a particular commercial need. If that need isn't there any longer what does it matter if the breed dies out though I guess if there was a major nuclear war the survivors would probably need a medieval type of sheep because that would be the level of their society.

There's this Longwool alongside the so called water railway cycle route between Boston and Lincoln. Show's the versatility of the breed - what other produces steel wool?

Image

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Paulatic
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Re: Agriculture

Postby Paulatic » 27 Jun 2020, 7:46am

I’ve seen them caught up in barbed wire but never that bad :lol:
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