Surnames

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Cyril Haearn
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Re: Surnames

Postby Cyril Haearn » 30 Aug 2020, 7:14pm

Perhaps people should be encouraged or required to choose their names themselves, maybe at age 21

Ernest is a worthy name, but it seems queer to give it to a tiny baby
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fausto copy
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Re: Surnames

Postby fausto copy » 30 Aug 2020, 7:32pm

All this talk of changing names, makes me wonder whether we should change the name (or title) of this thread!

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Mick F
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Re: Surnames

Postby Mick F » 30 Aug 2020, 7:43pm

:lol: :lol:
Help yourself!
Mick F. Cornwall

lbomaak2
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Location: Loughborough

Re: Surnames

Postby lbomaak2 » 30 Aug 2020, 8:52pm

As a university lecturer (recently retired) I have come across several students in recent years who wanted themselves known by a name that bore no relation to any of their "official" names.

PDQ Mobile
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Re: Surnames

Postby PDQ Mobile » 30 Aug 2020, 9:33pm

In much of rural Wales a person often "aquires" the surname of the place they live in.
So Harry Williams of Bwlch y Fedwen will become "Harry Bwlch" or "Harry Bwlch y Fedwen" if there's any risk of confusion.
It is an endearing and useful trait.
Especially in a place with relatively few common surnames.

It sometimes extends to other distinguishing features as has already been mentioned.
The story of "Wil Penny and a Half" springs to mind.
A rather small man but well endowed by all accounts.
And who made money in the war by betting with American serviceman about relative sizes!!! :shock:

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Surnames

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 30 Aug 2020, 9:54pm

Hi,
Mick F wrote:Going on from what TC was saying, I'm a Stephen Michael, but for all my life I've been Michael, Mike, or usually Mick.
Stephen bit of it is there, and I'm happy to be SM, but I dislike intensely being referred to as plain Stephen.
What gives people the right to call ANYONE by their first name without asking first?

It's got to the point, that I've "changed" my name by hyphenating it to Stephen-Michael rather than two separate Christian names.

Was common for son take your fathers first name, he took his fathers and his grandfather was also called Charles.
My brothers took my fathers 1st and 2nd as their second mid name.
Me and my twin were not planed................. :P and there was no name to carry for my middle name :)
Very common for people to take there 2nd name as there first...............most I think because they prefer it.
NA Thinks Just End 2 End Return + Bivvy
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drossall
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Re: Surnames

Postby drossall » 30 Aug 2020, 10:33pm

There again, in my old club sixty years ago, it was apparently the custom to name people after their bikes. For example "Claud" hadn't been christened by that name at all.

merseymouth
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Re: Surnames

Postby merseymouth » 1 Sep 2020, 6:16pm

Hello all, One of my late club mates, a bloke took his lady wife's name, there was money involved?
But he was a NRRA Record Holder, on a few counts.
So I was able to toast him at our dinner as the only man to set records in both maiden & married name! Trike records of cause! MM

mercalia
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Re: Surnames

Postby mercalia » 2 Sep 2020, 12:16pm

A strange chat by a black African who has the name Colston

When the statue of Edward Colston was pulled down in Bristol during the UK's Black Lives Matter protests, it had special resonance for one man thousands of miles away

What I didnt know was that slaves would be given a second name of the owner, an early form of barcode.
If the guy can be philosophical about some thing as personal as a name why not about statues, not being some kind of personal affront but a echo of just the bad times we have left behind?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-53941979

Elizabeth_S
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Re: Surnames

Postby Elizabeth_S » 2 Sep 2020, 12:47pm

Anyone who's done any family history will know that spelling was pretty fluid pre-1900, mainly because most people couldn't read or write and may have spoken to the minister with a strong accent. My husband's surname has at least half a dozen different spellings before they settled on one (and he's Scots and they all lived within a 10 mile radius for hundreds of years).
My great-grandparents came over from Ireland to Scotland as the McCormicks, they gave most of the kids born in Scotland a surname as a middle name to make them look more Scottish (random ones, it doesn't follow the naming rules), then they went down to Liverpool as the McCormacks as they thought it made them sound more Scottish! Of course I'm not actually sure if my g-g-granddads name was McCormick (or was Cormic) or even if his first name was Roderick or Roger (he used both, or even Rory).

Tangled Metal
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Re: Surnames

Postby Tangled Metal » 2 Sep 2020, 1:25pm

mercalia wrote:A strange chat by a black African who has the name Colston

When the statue of Edward Colston was pulled down in Bristol during the UK's Black Lives Matter protests, it had special resonance for one man thousands of miles away

What I didnt know was that slaves would be given a second name of the owner, an early form of barcode.
If the guy can be philosophical about some thing as personal as a name why not about statues, not being some kind of personal affront but a echo of just the bad times we have left behind?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-53941979

It's not uncommon I believe for black people to africanise their name and drop their slave name in the process. Some find their slave name as objectionable as the statue of slave traders. Perhaps you should be asking why do black people object to slaver statues and not slave names?

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Morzedec
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Re: Surnames

Postby Morzedec » 2 Sep 2020, 1:29pm

In my region of rural France many of the farmers are known by the name of their tractors or cars; hence 'Peugeot Pierre' for example.

Many French people struggle with their 'H's', so I'm often called Old 'Oldsworth'. Damn cheek: less of the old, please.

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mercalia
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Re: Surnames

Postby mercalia » 2 Sep 2020, 1:37pm

Tangled Metal wrote:
mercalia wrote:A strange chat by a black African who has the name Colston

When the statue of Edward Colston was pulled down in Bristol during the UK's Black Lives Matter protests, it had special resonance for one man thousands of miles away

What I didnt know was that slaves would be given a second name of the owner, an early form of barcode.
If the guy can be philosophical about some thing as personal as a name why not about statues, not being some kind of personal affront but a echo of just the bad times we have left behind?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-53941979

It's not uncommon I believe for black people to africanise their name and drop their slave name in the process. Some find their slave name as objectionable as the statue of slave traders. Perhaps you should be asking why do black people object to slaver statues and not slave names?


I thought I was

Jdsk
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Re: Surnames

Postby Jdsk » 2 Sep 2020, 2:24pm

mercalia wrote:What I didnt know was that slaves would be given a second name of the owner, an early form of barcode.

Why did you think that so many West Indians have European surnames? Slavery wasn't the only reason but most of the others were part of the systematic destruction of the Africans' identity and culture.

Is that comment about "barcode" a reference to branding?

Jonathan

ambodach
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Re: Surnames

Postby ambodach » 2 Sep 2020, 3:44pm

My own surname is territorial based on the lands occupied and a river as well. The original family were quite influential in early Scottish history but were defeated by rivals who stole the land by forced marriage. My forenames are from both sides of the family and have been used as family names for many years.