Wasps

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NUKe
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Location: Suffolk

Re: Wasps

Postby NUKe » 28 Sep 2020, 11:05am

https://www.facebook.com/martin.walker. ... 331810733/
An underground nest I found earlier this year.
I find them fascinating creatures, they are only aggressive in late summer earlier Autumn when the queen stops feeding or you attack them. They are pollinators and an affective control for Aphids. if they don't affect you please leave them alone.
NUKe
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pete75
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Re: Wasps

Postby pete75 » 28 Sep 2020, 11:10am

windmiller wrote:Wasps are to Bees as Cows are to Pigs, not closely related at all.
I think it is likely that some wasps eventually evolved into the various species of ants. One of the clues being that some primitive species of ants still retain the sting.


https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/envir ... s%20wings'.

'Bees and wasps are in fact very closely related to one another, alongside the ants (known as the Super-Families Apoidea, Vespoidea and Formicoidea, respectively) in the Insect Order of the Hymenoptera, referring to their two pairs of ‘membranous wings’. One feature that is common among the Hymenoptera is that of ‘sociality’ or group living. Many species of bees, ants and wasps live in family-based colonies, in which a maternal queen is served by dozens to thousands of her offspring, as devoted workers in the name of the family dynasty. '

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cycleruk
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Location: Lancashire

Re: Wasps

Postby cycleruk » 28 Sep 2020, 2:19pm


We virtually had no butterflies until a few weeks ago. Even the buddleia wasn't attracting any until very recently with just a few peacocks and red admirals mainly. The odd white and painted lady have also put in an appearance.
We used to get quite a lot of greenfly and blackfly but this year I can't say I have seen any.
We have not used any spray so maybe the funny weather we have had this year has affected them.
Same with slugs. Yes we have had some but nothing on the scale as previous years.
You'll never know if you don't try it.

windmiller
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Re: Wasps

Postby windmiller » 28 Sep 2020, 5:07pm

Jdsk wrote:
windmiller wrote:The present species of bees and wasps beyond both being flying stinging insects of a similar shape are very different to each other.

They're very closely related, as above. So closely that there is no monophyletic definition of wasps that doesn't include both ants and bees.

Jonathan

PS: In US English yellowjackets is used for insects like our common garden yellow and black stinging insects. I think that's a useful term for what we're often talking about and separates them from the vast majority of wasps that have completely different lifestyles... and don't spoil picnics.


While bees and wasps can be said to be related, they are far from being very or even closely related.

Lions and tigers, horse and donkey, goldfinch and canary etc, these different species can be said to be closely related on account that they can hybridize and produce offspring which may or may not be infertile. Bees and wasps can not interbreed because they are not closely related.

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661-Pete
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Location: Sussex

Re: Wasps

Postby 661-Pete » 29 Sep 2020, 1:14pm

Don't know if the common wasp is in decline round our way - we've certainly had plenty! What have shown up in surprising numbers in our garden are European Hornets - we've seen dozens of them browsing for nectar on an ivy-covered fence. A welcome visitor, in my view - far less aggressive and they won't spoil your picnic unlike common wasps. If they do sting, yes: it hurts, but they're very unlikely to unless you (proverbially) disturb the nest.

I also watched a hornet take out a common wasp very neatly. You see, they do a useful job....
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

thirdcrank
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Re: Wasps

Postby thirdcrank » 29 Sep 2020, 2:13pm

I don't remember seeing any wasps anywhere this year. They used to nest regularly in our garden. We don't use any pesticides. We've had plenty of bees.

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cycleruk
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Re: Wasps

Postby cycleruk » 29 Sep 2020, 3:43pm

NUKe wrote:https://www.facebook.com/martin.walker.71066/videos/3215837331810733/
An underground nest I found earlier this year.
I find them fascinating creatures, they are only aggressive in late summer earlier Autumn when the queen stops feeding or you attack them. They are pollinators and an affective control for Aphids. if they don't affect you please leave them alone.

I and neighbour keep a section of grass and trees tidy on a small embankment between our houses.
Last year I was stung by wasps when I mowed over their underground nest. Didn't know it was there. Never had a wasp sting before and was uncomfortable for a couple of days. Had a bee sting once when I knelt on it and that was painful. Didn't do the bee much good either. :shock:
Coincidentally we had a wasp visit our table at lunch time outside at the cafe. Probably attracted to the pot of jam on the table.
You'll never know if you don't try it.

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cycleruk
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Location: Lancashire

Re: Wasps

Postby cycleruk » 29 Sep 2020, 3:47pm

Butterflies - so I'm not the only one that hasn't seen many this year :-
https://dmtrk.net/DGT-723VO-CF93D767A0B ... 27/cr.aspx
You'll never know if you don't try it.

merseymouth
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Re: Wasps

Postby merseymouth » 29 Sep 2020, 5:41pm

Hi there, Last year wasp built a nest in the "Wendy House" in our back garden, no it was a play space for our little girl, it was a solid home for her Vespa GT200 scooter. Luckily it went a few years ago, she also left her nest, so I didn't have to enter very often.
The little things hated me, so was getting stung anytime I ventured near!
This year not a one? Phew.
This winter I'll venture in to tidy up & locate the nest. Then I will have more room for my toys. MM

Jdsk
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Re: Wasps

Postby Jdsk » 29 Sep 2020, 5:57pm

You do know what Vespa means... ?

: - )

Jonathan

mumbojumbo
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Re: Wasps

Postby mumbojumbo » 29 Sep 2020, 6:26pm

Apparently wasps are maligned and fertilise a much more diverse range of flora then their rival.the bee.Of course their honey is not as good.

merseymouth
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Re: Wasps

Postby merseymouth » 29 Sep 2020, 6:55pm

Hi JDSK, Yes, ironic isn't it! Could have had an "Ape" ending? Yes I know what they are. Hope I don't get stung with a big bill to get rid of the nest. MM

Jdsk
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Re: Wasps

Postby Jdsk » 29 Sep 2020, 6:57pm

I was impressed with your insects' sense of nominative determinism!

: - )

Jonathan

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661-Pete
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Re: Wasps

Postby 661-Pete » 30 Sep 2020, 9:22am

cycleruk wrote:Butterflies - so I'm not the only one that hasn't seen many this year :-
https://dmtrk.net/DGT-723VO-CF93D767A0B ... 27/cr.aspx
I know these are very depressing times all over, but I'm hoping things are not so dismal for our fluttery friends as it seems! Many butterflies experience big swings of 'ups and downs' in their populations from year to year. Two or three years ago the Common Blue (normally one of our commonest) was hardly to be seen, but they're back now. And migrant species like Painted Lady and Clouded Yellow have their 'good' years, and other years when they fail to show up at all.

What I can say is, and forgive me if I'm wrong here, that if many more people than usual have taken part in the Big Butterfly Count, many of them first-timers and inexperienced at spotting and identifying the creatures - also perhaps not choosing the best sites - then the number of sightings per person is quite likely to be down. Doesn't necessarily mean there are fewer butterflies.

Speaking for ourselves, we visited our usual site (on the Downs) for our contribution to the Count, logging about 60 individuals in 13 different species. That's well up to our average report, which we've been doing for many years now.

So perhaps it's not all doom and gloom - for the butterflies at least!
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).