Primitive Gait

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Mike Sales
Posts: 5370
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 3:22pm

pete75 wrote:The water works which supply Boston and Spalding were built well after Ingram's day, early twentieth century.
Something about the Bourne Spalding supply here https://www.spaldingvoice.co.uk/feature ... ea-passes/


Your link is about Spalding.

This 2012 article is about recent work on Boston's supply.
It refers to using a reservoir at Covenham, north of Louth, to supplement the existing Minningsby service reservoir.

https://wwtonline.co.uk/features/piping-up-for-boston


It seems that Minningsby was still being used in 2012 when it was supplemented by Covenham.

When was Boston water from Bourne carried to Wainfleet? I have not found a reference to this on the Bateman's website.

Bonefishblues
Posts: 8709
Joined: 7 Jul 2014, 9:45pm
Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Bonefishblues » 4 Jan 2021, 3:27pm

Much more and you'll be being called the Waterboys gents. :D

pete75
Posts: 13647
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 3:41pm

Mike Sales wrote:
pete75 wrote:The water works which supply Boston and Spalding were built well after Ingram's day, early twentieth century.
Something about the Bourne Spalding supply here https://www.spaldingvoice.co.uk/feature ... ea-passes/


Your link is about Spalding.

This 2012 article is about recent work on Boston's supply.
It refers to using a reservoir at Covenham, north of Louth, to supplement the existing Minningsby service reservoir.

https://wwtonline.co.uk/features/piping-up-for-boston


It seems that Minningsby was still being used in 2012 when it was supplemented by Covenham.

When was Boston water from Bourne carried to Wainfleet? I have not found a reference to this on the Bateman's website.


Between 1935 and 1950. http://www.breweryhistory.com/journal/a ... 7-002.html

Mike Sales
Posts: 5370
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 4:03pm

pete75 wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
pete75 wrote:The water works which supply Boston and Spalding were built well after Ingram's day, early twentieth century.
Something about the Bourne Spalding supply here https://www.spaldingvoice.co.uk/feature ... ea-passes/


Your link is about Spalding.

This 2012 article is about recent work on Boston's supply.
It refers to using a reservoir at Covenham, north of Louth, to supplement the existing Minningsby service reservoir.

https://wwtonline.co.uk/features/piping-up-for-boston


It seems that Minningsby was still being used in 2012 when it was supplemented by Covenham.

When was Boston water from Bourne carried to Wainfleet? I have not found a reference to this on the Bateman's website.


Between 1935 and 1950. http://www.breweryhistory.com/journal/a ... 7-002.html


Thanks. From your link.

Between about 1935 and the early 1950s the Brewery at one time used to take a tanker the seven or eight miles to Wrangle to take on water from a standpipe there. This water was from the Bourne water supply and was piped in by the Boston Rural District Council whose boundary was at Wrangle. The reason for this was that Bourne water was supposed to be very good for brewing. At the brewery the water was stored in a concrete tank in the yard ready for use.


Fair enough. I am still surprised that the BRDC found it useful to pipe water all the way from Bourne, when the town had a much nearer source. The Council would not have been after a good-for-brewing source, I would have thought. Minningsby must have supplied ample water in 1935, since it was only in this century that more was procured from Covenham.

The water now comes from the mains and it is supposed to come from a particular supply somewhere near to Louth but Mr Bateman suspects that under the grid system it is probably a mixture of all sorts. At one time in the late 1950s there was a danger that their then water supply might dry up so, they made an arrangement with the Spilsby Rural District Supply to ensure that water did not run out at the brewery.

Mr Bateman suspects that under the grid system it is probably a mixture of all sorts.


Not quite so fussy these days!
I enjoy their "good honest ale".

pete75
Posts: 13647
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 5:18pm

Mike Sales wrote:
Between about 1935 and the early 1950s the Brewery at one time used to take a tanker the seven or eight miles to Wrangle to take on water from a standpipe there. This water was from the Bourne water supply and was piped in by the Boston Rural District Council whose boundary was at Wrangle. The reason for this was that Bourne water was supposed to be very good for brewing. At the brewery the water was stored in a concrete tank in the yard ready for use.


Fair enough. I am still surprised that the BRDC found it useful to pipe water all the way from Bourne, when the town had a much nearer source. The Council would not have been after a good-for-brewing source, I would have thought. Minningsby must have supplied ample water in 1935, since it was only in this century that more was procured from Covenham.

The water now comes from the mains and it is supposed to come from a particular supply somewhere near to Louth but Mr Bateman suspects that under the grid system it is probably a mixture of all sorts. At one time in the late 1950s there was a danger that their then water supply might dry up so, they made an arrangement with the Spilsby Rural District Supply to ensure that water did not run out at the brewery.

Mr Bateman suspects that under the grid system it is probably a mixture of all sorts.


Not quite so fussy these days!
I enjoy their "good honest ale".


These days brewers treat the water with whatever minerals they think best for their beer.

Spalding council built their waterworks in Bourne early in the C20. Piped to Spalding and then round the Urban and Rural district which went out as far as Bicker. Not a long way to pipe it through to Boston from there.
Time was when Bourne water was so well thought of they had special railway wagons to ship it all over the place.

Image

Bonefishblues
Posts: 8709
Joined: 7 Jul 2014, 9:45pm
Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Bonefishblues » 4 Jan 2021, 5:39pm

I got talking to an old gent as we walked along the Slea one evening and he proudly told me how far the water came in order to flow down the river. I never looked tbh, but in its day it was a highly-regarded chalkstream, and held some great fishing.

Sadly (one assumes) abstraction has reduced the flow to a trickle that has to be augmented during the summer (how mad is that - the Abstractors were actually pumping water back in...)

pete75
Posts: 13647
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 6:16pm

Bonefishblues wrote:I got talking to an old gent as we walked along the Slea one evening and he proudly told me how far the water came in order to flow down the river. I never looked tbh, but in its day it was a highly-regarded chalkstream, and held some great fishing.

Sadly (one assumes) abstraction has reduced the flow to a trickle that has to be augmented during the summer (how mad is that - the Abstractors were actually pumping water back in...)

Canalised from Sleaford to where it joins the Witham at Chapel Hill after changing it's name to Kyme Eau. Not a chalk stream though. It flows over limestone.

Bonefishblues
Posts: 8709
Joined: 7 Jul 2014, 9:45pm
Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Bonefishblues » 4 Jan 2021, 7:05pm

pete75 wrote:
Bonefishblues wrote:I got talking to an old gent as we walked along the Slea one evening and he proudly told me how far the water came in order to flow down the river. I never looked tbh, but in its day it was a highly-regarded chalkstream, and held some great fishing.

Sadly (one assumes) abstraction has reduced the flow to a trickle that has to be augmented during the summer (how mad is that - the Abstractors were actually pumping water back in...)

Canalised from Sleaford to where it joins the Witham at Chapel Hill after changing it's name to Kyme Eau. Not a chalk stream though. It flows over limestone.

My mistake, yes it's a limestone aquifer.

Some remedial works (been installation and channel narrowing) were done subsequent to a Wild Trout Trust report, which is an interesting read, were you so minded.

https://www.wildtrout.org/av/river-slea-sleaford