Did you clap this time round - or last time?

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Syd
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby Syd » 12 Jan 2021, 11:13am

I can’t speak for nurses, as I don’t recruit any of those, but any recruitment process I have carried out over the past year has seen applicants both increase in number and quality.

francovendee
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby francovendee » 12 Jan 2021, 12:04pm

Syd wrote:I can’t speak for nurses, as I don’t recruit any of those, but any recruitment process I have carried out over the past year has seen applicants both increase in number and quality.

It was recruiting nurses in particular that I was interested in.
Along with this an interest in has the retention of nurses improved or worsened?

Jdsk
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby Jdsk » 12 Jan 2021, 12:11pm

francovendee wrote:
Syd wrote:I can’t speak for nurses, as I don’t recruit any of those, but any recruitment process I have carried out over the past year has seen applicants both increase in number and quality.

It was recruiting nurses in particular that I was interested in.
Along with this an interest in has the retention of nurses improved or worsened?

ONS report, published June 2019:
https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/governmentpublicsectorandtaxes/publicspending/articles/isstaffretentionanissueinthepublicsector/2019-06-17

NHS Improvement: "The national retention programme: two years on":
https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/national-retention-programme-two-years-on/

Jonathan

Ben@Forest
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby Ben@Forest » 12 Jan 2021, 12:24pm

pwa wrote: Nursing staff are generally £30k or less, unless they have risen well up the ladder.


Well it depends on what you define 'risen well up the ladder'. A newly qualified nurse is Band 5 and starts on £25,000; about 7 years later, and without moving up any pay bands, increments will take that to £30,000 a year. In 2018 the Royal College of Nursing calculated the average annual pay for a nurse is £33,384, which roughly means the average nurse is in Band 6 with 2 years experience in that Band.

This is unless you're including auxiliary nurses, who obviously have an important nursing role, but who can start with a minimum of NVQs or even on-the-job training, they do not do three years training to start. My mother-in-law worked as a nursing auxiliary for the last 20 or so years of her working life. She started with no qualifications beyond common sense.

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Syd
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Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby Syd » 12 Jan 2021, 12:32pm

Ben@Forest wrote:
pwa wrote: Nursing staff are generally £30k or less, unless they have risen well up the ladder.


Well it depends on what you define 'risen well up the ladder'. A newly qualified nurse is Band 5 and starts on £25,000; about 7 years later, and without moving up any pay bands, increments will take that to £30,000 a year. In 2018 the Royal College of Nursing calculated the average annual pay for a nurse is £33,384, which roughly means the average nurse is in Band 6 with 2 years experience in that Band.

This is unless you're including auxiliary nurses, who obviously have an important nursing role, but who can start with a minimum of NVQs or even on-the-job training, they do not do three years training to start. My mother-in-law worked as a nursing auxiliary for the last 20 or so years of her working life. She started with no qualifications beyond common sense.

Due to changes being finalised this year it will now take less time to go from bottom of the band to the top. Its also geared to help the lower bands move up quicker.

At the time agenda for change came about grade D and E staff nurses were both move across to band 5, (grade compression) grade D at the bottom and grade E at midpoint. This means what would have been a grade D nurse now no longer needs to gain promotion to end up earning what previously would have been a grade E salary.

francovendee
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby francovendee » 12 Jan 2021, 1:18pm

I've taken a look but the NHS retention scheme and it's showing a .6% improvement from 2017. I'm not clear what this period covers. I infer it's up to June 2019.
I can't see a date for the publication but two years is mentioned in the text?

Oldjohnw
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby Oldjohnw » 12 Jan 2021, 3:52pm

pwa wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:
landsurfer wrote:£56K a year combined take home pay


I don't resent their money which is roughly similar to classroom teachers but I must say this is hardly breadline stuff where people need to visit foodbanks to survive.

When you say "take home" do you really mean take home ie after taxes, NIC, pension etc?

My wife has been teaching for thirty years and has never got near £56k, even as a head of department. And the higher paid roles have been disappearing, meaning that she has effectively been demoted like many of her colleagues, resulting in shrinking pay. £40k is more like it these days.

Nursing staff are generally £30k or less, unless they have risen well up the ladder.

My own job puts me on the front line, exposed to potentially infected members of the public, and a lot of the people I come into contact with appreciate that and thank me. Face to face. Which is nice. If you don't clap, fine, but it is good to show some appreciation to key workers who keep the wheels rolling, however you do it. It does make them feel that they are not being taken for granted.


This was the joint income .
John

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Syd
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby Syd » 14 Jan 2021, 8:37pm

Oldjohnw wrote:
pwa wrote:
Oldjohnw wrote:
I don't resent their money which is roughly similar to classroom teachers but I must say this is hardly breadline stuff where people need to visit foodbanks to survive.

When you say "take home" do you really mean take home ie after taxes, NIC, pension etc?

My wife has been teaching for thirty years and has never got near £56k, even as a head of department. And the higher paid roles have been disappearing, meaning that she has effectively been demoted like many of her colleagues, resulting in shrinking pay. £40k is more like it these days.

Nursing staff are generally £30k or less, unless they have risen well up the ladder.

My own job puts me on the front line, exposed to potentially infected members of the public, and a lot of the people I come into contact with appreciate that and thank me. Face to face. Which is nice. If you don't clap, fine, but it is good to show some appreciation to key workers who keep the wheels rolling, however you do it. It does make them feel that they are not being taken for granted.


This was the joint income .

Which will be a bit higher now once the incorrect salary is sorted out

David9694
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Re: Did you clap this time round - or last time?

Postby David9694 » 16 Jan 2021, 9:55am

It was nice to see our neighbours the first time around - it became a thing for a short while in our road. I don’t like it though - mawkish, hypocritical in many people’s case. Wasn’t sorry to see the attempted revival flop.

NHS staff deserve better.