"Essential journeys"

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eileithyia
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"Essential journeys"

Postby eileithyia » 7 Jan 2010, 8:12am

We are told to make only essential journeys in this inclement weather but just what are "essential journeys"?
Should we all give up ideas of going to work? Dental Appointments?

And what of the BBC reporter who had made "an horrendous journey" to get to Upton-on-Severn yesterday in order to report on the state of the worcestershire roads, was that really a necessary journey?

And why oh why has Downing street not got the snow that has, apparently, affected the rest of London?
I stand and rejoice everytime I see a woman ride by on a wheel the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood. HG Wells

Edwards
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby Edwards » 7 Jan 2010, 8:32am

eileithyia wrote:And why oh why has Downing street not got the snow that has, apparently, affected the rest of London?


All the hot air from the nonsence only the politicians seem to care about.
Teams employed on expenses to keep the snow away from all MP's.
Keith Edwards
I do not care about spelling and grammar

mw3230
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby mw3230 » 7 Jan 2010, 8:45am

What is essential? - good question.

My daughter has been instructed to travel from Birmingham to North Wales and when she queried the need to travel given the conditions, her boss took the line that if she (the boss) could get there then she (daughter) can also.

The alternative seems to be to risk the displeasure of a manager for whom daughter has only worked for a few months.

My wife woke with toothache throught the night. I'll probably have to drive her to the dentist. Also essential I'd suggest so that her toothache doesn't give ME earache!
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thirdcrank
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby thirdcrank » 7 Jan 2010, 8:59am

eileithyia wrote: ... And what of the BBC reporter who had made "an horrendous journey" to get to Upton-on-Severn yesterday in order to report on the state of the worcestershire roads, was that really a necessary journey? ...


Hear, hear.

The BBC regional "news" programme "The Harold Bird Show" AKA Look North (Yorks version) had any number of people including two reporters at Mountain Primary School in Bradford - reputedly the highest in England (primary school, that is, not mountain) which had remained open. The BBC national news also had another reporter there. I could imagine that the dedicated staff, having managed to get into work, will have been prevented from getting home on roads blocked by BBC vehicles. In the meantime, anchorman H Gration, having gone to York front an iem on snow in York, got stuck on the A 59 on the way to Harrogate to front another important item about --- snow.

The other thing is that they are sowing the seeds of shortages and panic buying - another big story to come - if they are lucky.

eileithyia
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby eileithyia » 7 Jan 2010, 9:15am

I got to my dental appt yesterday (walked as I would've done anyway)only to find the hygienist could not get there.

When we had an horrendous snowfall in 1990 that stopped all traffic moving on the M6 and A45 tween Cov and Brum, there were genuinely stuck drivers who could not be reached cos the joyriders blocked the roads after they also got stuck!

Interesting thought mw3230, if daughter got stuck, had her car damaged, was injured I wonder what manager's attitude would be then. An employee off for a long period of sick could be quite costly to the firm...... Or would she pay your daughter's no claims losses. After all she insisted on the non-essential journey.

You can tell I'm bored with no cycling, the Devil is working overtime and throwing up interesting thoughts! lol
I stand and rejoice everytime I see a woman ride by on a wheel the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood. HG Wells

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Mick F
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby Mick F » 7 Jan 2010, 9:20am

I was going to start a new thread on this, but this one is ok!

I remember the '62 '63 winter. The snow fell just after Christmas, and didn't completely go until March. We had 6ft drifts up our road, and one morning we had to dig our way out of the house because the drifts had gone against the house walls. My upstairs bedroom was level with the top of the drift!

We had ice on the INSIDE of the windows, it was miserable and awful and bitterly cold. The snow ploughs came through every day to keep the roads open. We weren't living in the back of beyond in those days, just half a mile from the A5209 in Wrightington and only 6 miles from our primary school in Wigan.

The schools went back after the Christmas break, no schools were closed, we all made it in, teachers too. The buses ran, parents got to work, life went on. Normality, with difficulty, carried on regardless.

What is wrong with us now?
Mick F. Cornwall

groveller
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby groveller » 7 Jan 2010, 10:04am

In the winter of 1962/63 I was working as a mechanic at a garage with very limited workshop space.
The single hydraulic 4 post lift was outside, the hydraulic oil had to be heated each morning to get it working. All other work was done in the yard in snow and ice. I've never been so cold in all my life.
There was one sink to wash our hands.
These conditions lasted From Boxing Day till Easter.
At home nobody had central heating at that time.
Needless to say I got out of that job later in the year!

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squeaker
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby squeaker » 7 Jan 2010, 10:13am

Mick F wrote:What is wrong with us now?
IMO 'we' are all accustomed to jumping into 'our' cars each morning and driving crazy (to me) distances to work, or using the car for short trips to the shops etc.. It doesn't take much for traffic queues to turn to gridlock......
"42"

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Colin63
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby Colin63 » 7 Jan 2010, 10:31am

Mick F wrote:What is wrong with us now?


Nothing. I think that people are mistaking news stories about specific events as being the truth about what is happening generally. Most people are getting into work.
In 1963 school teachers tended to live near their schools and so could more easily make it into work. I know several teachers and they all work a long way from home and so journeys in these conditions become more challenging and risky. We also have better communications so that it is quite easy for schools and parents to be in touch, rather than everyone fighting their way to work because they feel they can't risk not going in because little Johnny might be stuck outside the gate in sub zero temperatures. That bit is progress I think. These periods of people not getting into work only last a few days. The country hasn't stopped, it's just adjusting and I see no harm in folks waiting until they feel safe. I'm sure the snow ploughs in '63 didn't all appear on the roads on day one with everyone instantly battling through, however people remember it (I can't remember much as I was tucked up cosily in a womb at the time). I think that it very irresponsible for employers to demand that employees make journeys that they don't feel able to do, I think that says more about what's wrong with us than having a few days of staff shortages.

I've been off work since 18th December, apart from Monday this week when I managed to get through, as the reserve is cut off. My manager has been keeping me up to date and says that yesterday he nearly crashed several times in a Land Rover trying to get to the site. Minor roads are impassable for little cars like mine. I'd much rather be out working in the woods even at -8˚C than having to do all this dull admin I've been sent (the bad side of better communications :( ), though it does mean that I can be on call to help my elderly neighbour who is absolutely unable to leave her house at the moment.

One thing I do think is missing is a sense of community responsibility. Our pavements are slippery and dangerous, but I've yet to find a stretch near my home which has been cleared by a resident. I have heard people moaning that the council didn't clear some bridge steps (me included) but no one took it upon themselves to do it, and someone has now been hospitalised as a result. If we'd all got stuck into working through it together rather than carrying on with our isolated lives we'd probably be back to normal far quicker. One day of being out on the streets clearing pavements while the councils cleared the roads and everything would have been sorted.

There, that's my simple solution to the world's woes :) I'd better get outside with a shovel now and practice what I preach.

eileithyia
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby eileithyia » 7 Jan 2010, 11:16am

Agree with Squeaker.

I was too young to be at school in '62/'63 so that was not an issue, but my dad only worked 11/2 miles from home so getting to work was not a problem and he never drove to work always cycled(in fact did not learn until at least a year later). Mum (as most of the women in our street) was fortunate enough to not have to work, so less people travelling out to work and we used to walking tot he local shops for provisions.
As I said in the thread of a 1950's winter, we lived closer to our place of work and far less vehicles were on the road. We did not have gridlock situations that prevent vehicles such as gritters getting through.
They too can be stuck in traffic jams but whilst we are sat in our cars moaning about them not getting through do we ever consider that?

I am never sure about the "clear the paths" ethos. Some paths around here have had some clearing done, but have been left slippy, frankly I find the snow easier on to walk on than some of the "cleared" areas that are now quite icy.

My neighbour cleared some paths whilst it was still snowing so there is still snow, just not quite so much of it. Having said that will be out shortly to do some clearing and gritting, now that it is no longer snoing it will not be quite such a worthless exercise.
I stand and rejoice everytime I see a woman ride by on a wheel the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood. HG Wells

glueman
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby glueman » 7 Jan 2010, 11:35am

thirdcrank wrote:Hear, hear.

The BBC regional "news" programme "The Harold Bird Show" AKA Look North (Yorks version) had any number of people including two reporters at Mountain Primary School in Bradford - reputedly the highest in England (primary school, that is, not mountain) which had remained open.


Christa looks radioactive enough to zap any snow. Although I'm bang in Look North territory now my TV aerial used to be tuned to it when I lived way down into the midlands because of a slag heap in the way of nearer transmitters. The next street could only pick up west midlands telly, though it was firmly in the eastern sector.
The local dentist could pick up both. Apparently in the early days Holme Moss transmitter used to serve east anglia, parts of Northern Ireland and way up into the north pennines.

In our house we place bets on how long before Dicky Bird starts weeping. 'He's filling up' claims usually start around 15 seconds into a piece.

thirdcrank
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby thirdcrank » 7 Jan 2010, 11:41am

Mick F wrote:...What is wrong with us now?


It's hard to imagine that people are much different. One of the biggest changes - and I should have thought this was pretty obvious to most cyclists - is that most of the polulation has become used to travelling everywhere by car, sometimes much bigger distances than once were the case. The most obvious effects are that even at the best of times, much the road infrastructure is on the edge of gridlock and adverse conditions just tip it over the edge. The longer a journey, the more vulnerable it is to problems. This is not only a question of distance, but also what might be called remoteness. Whe I was at school in the late 50's early 60's one of the teachers rented at piffling cost a long-unoccupied lead miners cottage in the moors alongside Greenhow Hill (Pately Bridge.) He used to organise 'outweard bound' type trips. On one walk we ended up at a farmhouse. We all sat in the kitchen enjoying the hospitality. Among other things, we heard that the lady of the house did her Christmas shopping in Pateley Bridge in September, usually every other year. I fancy that that farmhouse, the miner's cottage, and many more like them all over the place are now used by people working in cities. Some are second homes but plenty are not. Charging about narrow lanes in good weather is one thing, but in winter these are very remote, harsh places. Most motorways follow a completely new route. The gentle routes were all taken by the roads dating from pre-historic times. This means that many motorways, even in quite low-lying areas, go through remote areas our predecessors didn't bother with. People are used to sitting in a car and zooming along as though they are in a mobile sitting room. If something goes wrong in winter - as the bleating Madeley found out on the M11, it's not unlike the North Pole, but without the sleds.

Having said all that, there are people who take advantage of any excuse to stay at home - wasn't that always the case?

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meic
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby meic » 7 Jan 2010, 12:24pm

We had plenty of ice on the inside of our windows this morning. :D

The big problem is people living too far from their places of work and too far from their shops.

However people are now "snowed in" in cases that would not have been the case in 1963 or before that because people then were able to WALK. The radio is forever talking of people being trapped but what they mean is no vehicular access.

Those of us who DO live miles from everything have (or should have) learnt to stock up for long periods of isolation. In my case I had already been away from the shops for two weeks to avoid the Christmas crowds before the snows came. Bad timing but we still made the trip down in the afternoon sun on Monday to get some fresh fruit and veg, everything else is already available in the house.
Same goes for energy supplies, we have stocks of DIFFERENT fuels so that we can get through any cuts or failure to deliver.
Apart from not being able to ride the bike I am quite enjoying this peaceful period.

It is a sad fact that some people are so close to the line that they literally can NOT afford to miss a weeks pay package but most are more than able to absorb the shock.
Hopefully it will make people less eager to accept jobs too far away to get to them reliably.

Back to the main point of the post, essential journeys?
Thats easy, My journeys are essential and everyone elses arent.
Yma o Hyd

cjchambers
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby cjchambers » 7 Jan 2010, 12:32pm

meic wrote:The radio is forever talking of people being trapped but what they mean is no vehicular access.


Yes - I think that "snowed in" is a term that should be reserved for describing a situation where one can't actually get out of the house and walk somewhere.

mw3230
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Re: "Essential journeys"

Postby mw3230 » 7 Jan 2010, 1:54pm

meic wrote:We had plenty of ice on the inside of our windows this morning. :D

The big problem is people living too far from their places of work and too far from their shops.

............It is a sad fact that some people are so close to the line that they literally can NOT afford to miss a weeks pay package but most are more than able to absorb the shock.
Hopefully it will make people less eager to accept jobs too far away to get to them reliably.............

.


It's rather strange that people seem to expect to be paid when they do not turn up for work. I pity the small employers who are up to their necks in debt trying to make a living for themselves and their staff. Should they be hit with paying non-attenders (in addition to being penalised by need to pay the iniquitous paternity payments)
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