bike bushcraft

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Edwards
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Edwards » 25 Aug 2011, 7:13pm

tramponabike wrote: There is more than one way to damage the environment.


This is something I have been trying to say all along also the fact that to much of some forms of bush craft damages our natural environment permanently.
Yes an open fire with a pan on top is not very good but if you think about how the KK works it is possible to get some very good efficiency results by using earth or stones to replicate this. The best example I can think off is a bank fire with chimney.

Just to repeat myself real bush craft should do no damage and not use unsustainable amounts of natural resources.
Keith Edwards
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Si
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Si » 25 Aug 2011, 7:24pm

Just to repeat myself real bush craft should do no damage and not use unsustainable amounts of natural resources.


I think that you have to take scale into account too: in terms of living off the land / bush-craft in the Brit Isles you probably have to concede that the best at it were those of the Mesolithic. Yet if they'd done no damage then they wouldn't have appeared in the archaeological record and we'd know nothing at all about them! A bit of damage ought to be OK as long as 'nature' can recover from it fairly quickly.

tramponabike
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby tramponabike » 25 Aug 2011, 7:50pm

Si wrote:
Just to repeat myself real bush craft should do no damage and not use unsustainable amounts of natural resources.


I think that you have to take scale into account too: in terms of living off the land / bush-craft in the Brit Isles you probably have to concede that the best at it were those of the Mesolithic. Yet if they'd done no damage then they wouldn't have appeared in the archaeological record and we'd know nothing at all about them! A bit of damage ought to be OK as long as 'nature' can recover from it fairly quickly.


True. We are after all part of the "system" and will inevitably leave our mark. Even cows fart!

Edwards
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Edwards » 25 Aug 2011, 7:53pm

Si I think I may have said something about learning from ancient hunter gatherers earlier in the thread.
If we can not learn from the past not just about the bad but the good then I do wonder about this society.
Keith Edwards
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reohn2
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby reohn2 » 25 Aug 2011, 11:03pm

I just knew it was getting around to a primus stove thread! :) :shock:

I said to myself,"John 'owd lad, it looks promising" :roll:
Last edited by reohn2 on 26 Aug 2011, 10:35am, edited 1 time in total.
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ukbushman
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby ukbushman » 26 Aug 2011, 9:02am

back to the topic in question, has anyone actually practices bushcraft by bike?
UKB

wirral_cyclist
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby wirral_cyclist » 26 Aug 2011, 9:30am

ukbushman wrote:back to the topic in question, has anyone actually practices bushcraft by bike?


I thought you given up trying to sell the fruit picking lessons?

tramponabike
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby tramponabike » 26 Aug 2011, 1:33pm

ukbushman wrote:back to the topic in question, has anyone actually practices bushcraft by bike?

As I said in post 5, I use my bike to reach as remote and unpopulated an area as I can. I may then use my bike and a waterproof sheet to make a shelter. I use a small stove appropriately fuelled :) ) to cook simple food which I have usually brought with me. I don't kill for food (so unnecessary, I think) and I don't believe foraging is sufficiently reliable to be a realistic food source in the UK. I might need to cut a peg or two or a spring pole with a penknife for my basha but as most wild places are high up in the UK, there is often no wood available and what there is should be left alone. I take great care to impact on my chosen site as little as possible.

I have been doing similar for many years but have never considered it to be bushcraft. As my name suggests, more tramponabike than bushcrafter.

I would be interested to hear what a bushcrafter might do differently, and why they need quite so many edge tools to do it.

Lawrie9
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Lawrie9 » 26 Aug 2011, 6:56pm

There isn't much wild bush about in Britain and one just has to be resourceful and live by ones wits as tramp does. Just finding clean water and somewhere to sleep for the night can be challenging. I would always take a pair of secateurs because they are great for cutting poles and firewood and also for clearing brambles on overgrown paths so you can find very secluded spots for wild camping.
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Hypocacculus
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Hypocacculus » 26 Aug 2011, 7:33pm

I'm curious to know where the idea that burning wood is carbon neutral came from. It is my experience that it takes a lot less time to burn a tree than to grow one. For example, I have a big tree in my back garden, that has been growing there for just under 50 years. If I had it chopped down and used it as fuel for cooking and heating, how many years would it last me? I can't answer the question precisely but I'm pretty sure it is not 50 years. Or even 10.

It may not be as extreme as burning gas or coal, but fundamentally burning wood is not a way out of our energy crisis or "carbon neutral". It is just another way of returning carbon to our atmosphere faster than it is absorbed.

Edwards
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Edwards » 26 Aug 2011, 8:03pm

To be carbon neutral you should replace any tree felled with at least one more. I have to prune the tree in my garden so if I burn the trimmed bits and do not kill the tree is that as near to neutral as I can get.

Tramponabike from what I can gather you do practice bush craft in a form. As this way of dong things now seems to include so many different things and ways of doing it.
Keith Edwards
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hubgearfreak
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby hubgearfreak » 26 Aug 2011, 8:06pm

last time i used a kelly kettle, i didn't chop a tree down. infact, i don't recall ever having resorted to felling the fuel for it. i can't be alone in collecting sticks for mine, can i?
which leads me to wonder what'll happen to the sticks if i didn't use them in the KK. that's right they'll decompose, eventually into CO2 amongst other things.

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Greybeard
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Greybeard » 26 Aug 2011, 8:17pm

Kelly Kettle? It's the future :D
Image
There's a forest full of fuel waiting to be picked up around Kielder Water. In fact I'm going back on Monday to use some more :wink:
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Edwards
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Edwards » 26 Aug 2011, 8:55pm

I hope to use our KK when we go out on the tandem on Sunday. It is bigger than a gas stove but is a lot more therapeutic especialy when using a tea pot as well.
Keith Edwards
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Lawrie9
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Re: bike bushcraft

Postby Lawrie9 » 27 Aug 2011, 10:56am

Real bushcraft has no impact on the natural environment and can be very beneficial such as the way the old bodgers did in coppicing and thinning woodland for making chair legs and cotton reels. As long as you don't leave litter and do something to enhance the envoronment such as clearing brambles from tree saplings your presence will help. In a healthy woodland situation trees naturally seed and grow as they did for millions of years before man walked on the earth. In my garden I am conatantly having to pull up sycamore, hazel, ash and willow saplings that have seeded themselves.
No jam doughnuts stored here overnight