Short cuts

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Edwards
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Re: Short cuts

Postby Edwards » 24 Nov 2012, 7:31am

Colin we had a Tupperware version of one of those, I never got on with it. Now I purchase grated cheese sometimes, but generally prefer to thinly slice from a block.
Our son has the same type as Colin and thinks it great. So much so that when we visited we took some pre bought stuff and he rejected it, preferring to use his grater.

I wonder if the bought grated cheese is made from the small off cuts or is it not cost efective to do that?

I like cheese and lettuce but can not stand Rocket. I prefer the taste of our Privet hedge, so could just go out the front with the cheese for a snack. :lol:
Keith Edwards
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JohnW
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Re: Short cuts

Postby JohnW » 25 Nov 2012, 3:00pm

jan19 wrote:So what do you do which saves time, but not money?

My pet hate is grating cheese. I just hate doing it. I don't know why. Yes, its silly I know, but I'll happily buy grated cheese, rather than buy a block and grate it myself. Completely unviable economically.....................................Jan


I'm not too sure about that Jan - Sainsbury's own-brand grated cheeses are cheaper than the solid cheese. At least, that was the case the last time I bothered to check the price. It's also their decent quality cheese - or seems to be - not a "value" or "basics" quality.

mrjemm
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Re: Short cuts

Postby mrjemm » 25 Nov 2012, 3:39pm

Edwards wrote:Colin we had a Tupperware version of one of those, I never got on with it. Now I purchase grated cheese sometimes, but generally prefer to thinly slice from a block.
Our son has the same type as Colin and thinks it great. So much so that when we visited we took some pre bought stuff and he rejected it, preferring to use his grater.

I wonder if the bought grated cheese is made from the small off cuts or is it not cost efective to do that?

I like cheese and lettuce but can not stand Rocket. I prefer the taste of our Privet hedge, so could just go out the front with the cheese for a snack. :lol:


With you re Colin's box- we have one from another maker, and continue to use the traditional one, but madame's decided we need one of those newer micro thingy ones- them with the mega sharp razor blades that'll take my knuckle bones as well as the flesh.

But rocket is one of the few salad leaves I find have flavour- nice spiciness.

Maybe if it is made from offcuts, as you theorise, it would explain it's cheapness. Think I'll stick to the blocks though- much nicer to cut a chunk off and munch merrily.

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jan19
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Re: Short cuts

Postby jan19 » 25 Nov 2012, 4:36pm

I'm not too sure about that Jan - Sainsbury's own-brand grated cheeses are cheaper than the solid cheese.


Hmm, well I find that a bit unusual - ready prepared stuff is generally more expensive than produce you have to prepare yourself. There may of course have been offers on at Sainsburys which would distort the price.

I've just looked on the Ocado site, and the ready-grated stuff I normally buy is £2 per kilo more expensive than the normal blocks.

Jan

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gaz
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Re: Short cuts

Postby gaz » 25 Nov 2012, 8:54pm

531colin wrote:The only type of cheese grater worth having.............http://www.legendcookshop.co.uk/oblong-cheese-grater-storage-box-22476-0.html


I disagree. One of these is worth having.....http://www.chefdepot.net/graphics13/boxgrater.jpg

I find it worth having in the garage. The fine grate is really good for roughing up punctured inner tubes for patching. You could probably do the job with one of yours but I wouldn't fancy trying meic's rotary version. :wink:
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jan19
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Re: Short cuts

Postby jan19 » 25 Nov 2012, 9:02pm

I disagree. One of these is worth having.....http://www.chefdepot.net/graphics13/boxgrater.jpg

I find it worth having in the garage. The fine grate is really good for roughing up punctured inner tubes for patching. You could probably do the job with one of yours but I wouldn't fancy trying meic's rotary version.
Yes, but they are still too much trouble to grate cheese with.

Jan

JohnW
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Re: Short cuts

Postby JohnW » 25 Nov 2012, 9:53pm

jan19 wrote:
I'm not too sure about that Jan - Sainsbury's own-brand grated cheeses are cheaper than the solid cheese.


Hmm, well I find that a bit unusual - ready prepared stuff is generally more expensive than produce you have to prepare ................Jan


Ok Ok Ok - I'll be in town tomorrow Jan - and I'll check.

Of course, now you've resigned your commission as Forum Strictly Come Dancing correspondent you could apply for the vacancy of Forum Grated Cheese Reporter. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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jan19
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Re: Short cuts

Postby jan19 » 25 Nov 2012, 10:05pm

Of course, now you've resigned your commission as Forum Strictly Come Dancing correspondent you could apply for the vacancy of Forum Grated Cheese Reporter.


OK, but so long as its grated. I don't mind how much it costs. Just so long as I don't have to grate it myself.

Jan :lol:

thirdcrank
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Re: Short cuts

Postby thirdcrank » 25 Nov 2012, 10:08pm

I was even slower than usual to realise what this was about. At least, I hope it's about doing things the easy way, even when there's a hard way. (Otherwise I've not even found the plot.)

For most cookery I'm a slavish and literal follower of instructions because I dare not risk doing it any other way but I throw caution to the winds when baking bread. :shock:

I use quick yeast, rather than the natural stuff. I use a dough hook in the food processor to do the kneading. I only prove it once. That's my shameful secret revealed. :oops:

JohnW
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Re: Short cuts

Postby JohnW » 25 Nov 2012, 10:18pm

thirdcrank wrote:......................I throw caution to the winds when baking bread. .............I use quick yeast, rather than the natural stuff. I use a dough hook in the food processor to do the kneading. I only prove it once. That's my shameful secret revealed.............:


Yeah - but is the bread OK?

Ray
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Re: Short cuts

Postby Ray » 25 Nov 2012, 10:35pm

thirdcrank wrote:I use quick yeast, rather than the natural stuff. I use a dough hook in the food processor to do the kneading. I only prove it once. That's my shameful secret revealed. :oops:


Too much like hard work. I'm totally shameless. I use a bread making machine. And the bread's OK. :)

Ray
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al_yrpal
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Re: Short cuts

Postby al_yrpal » 25 Nov 2012, 11:47pm

When my wife broke her foot many years ago I had to take over the cooking. I found cooking very theraputic and have done it and the shopping ever since. At that time, long before Jamie, Ainsley Harriot wrote his Meals in Minutes books. I learned to cook with these. You can do all sorts of three course meals in 30 minutes or so and Ainsley is particularly clever with flavours and making things with a twist. There are all sorts of stupid things in cookery that are unecessesary. Sweating onions in soup bases, Browning meat to go in casseroles. Simmering Bolognese or chilli for ages. To prove it to myself I have done things the Delia way and then the Ainsley way, and noted that it usually doesn't make any difference. These books are still around, often second hand on Amazon. If you want to cook all sorts of things fast and with minimum effort using short cuts, read up Ainsley.

Al
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Russcoles
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Re: Short cuts

Postby Russcoles » 26 Nov 2012, 2:13am

I don't grate cheese and also don't pay extra for pre-grated cheese. What I do is use Caerphilly or Wensleydale which is generally cheaper and when sliced will crumble. Less money and less washing up :)

JohnW
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Re: Short cuts

Postby JohnW » 26 Nov 2012, 9:30am

al_yrpal wrote:When my wife broke her foot many years ago I had to take over the cooking. I found cooking very theraputic and have done it and the shopping ever since. At that time, long before Jamie, Ainsley Harriot wrote his Meals in Minutes books. I learned to cook with these. You can do all sorts of three course meals in 30 minutes or so and Ainsley is particularly clever with flavours and making things with a twist. There are all sorts of stupid things in cookery that are unecessesary. Sweating onions in soup bases, Browning meat to go in casseroles. Simmering Bolognese or chilli for ages. To prove it to myself I have done things the Delia way and then the Ainsley way, and noted that it usually doesn't make any difference. These books are still around, often second hand on Amazon. If you want to cook all sorts of things fast and with minimum effort using short cuts, read up Ainsley.

Al


Yeah - but have you joined the Worshipful International Order of Cheese Graters? - it's becoming compulsory for CTC members and will soon be applying for charitable status.

The Mechanic
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Re: Short cuts

Postby The Mechanic » 26 Nov 2012, 2:37pm

I don't grate cheese but I am sure one's cook does from time to time.
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