Wood protection

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Si
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Wood protection

Postby Si » 8 Mar 2013, 3:47pm

I need to hammer some 2x1 stakes into the ground in my garden. I realise that they are going to rot away eventually, no matter what I do, but I'd like them to last a few years. What would you suggest that I treat them with to give them a bit of protection first?
Afraid that laying concrete or using metal/plastic collars, etc is not an option - they just need to go straight in to the earth.
cheers

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gaz
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Re: Wood protection

Postby gaz » 8 Mar 2013, 4:12pm

Hammering in wooden stakes? You are a vampire slayer and I claim my £5.

If possible use pressure treated timber. End grain preservative should also be useful. Two coats are usually recommended, let it dry between coats and before burial.
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ncutler
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Re: Wood protection

Postby ncutler » 8 Mar 2013, 4:14pm

I'd purchase wood that has been pressure treated. 'Tanalised' is one such.

An inexpensive source of 2x1 is tile batten - treated timber intended for hanging tiles on roofs. We use a lot of it for poultry runs, fruit cage uprights, etc.

Should last 15 to 20 years in the open, a bit less in t'ground.

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ferrit worrier
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Re: Wood protection

Postby ferrit worrier » 8 Mar 2013, 4:31pm

don't use planed timber, use sawn as the grain of the timber is still relatively closed. with planed timber the grain is more open. selct your timber and stand it in a tub of preservative so that it creeps up the grain internally by capilliary action. If you can get treated timber in 2x1 then so much better.

Malc
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Mick F
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Re: Wood protection

Postby Mick F » 8 Mar 2013, 4:36pm

+1 for all the replies.
Mick F. Cornwall

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Si
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Re: Wood protection

Postby Si » 9 Mar 2013, 10:33am

Alas, I already have the wood - a collection of random off-cuts...some of it appears to be pretreated but other bits are just plain sawn. Thus wondering what I can put on these? A browse in the local DIY shows a staggering array of different products all claiming to be the bee's knees.

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gaz
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Re: Wood protection

Postby gaz » 9 Mar 2013, 12:18pm

The tins are usually huge, aimed at treating an entire shed, fence or the like. Probably too much for your intended use. My garage has left overs from pots of decking preservative, end grain preservative, fence preservative, etc.

I don't think Royal Mail would like it if I sent you some, they seem to get edgy about liquids especially when they are repackaged in unmarked containers.

Ask friends if they have any leftovers lurking in their sheds, failing that buy the smallest/cheapest available tin.
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reohn2
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Re: Wood protection

Postby reohn2 » 9 Mar 2013, 12:49pm

ferrit worrier wrote:don't use planed timber, use sawn as the grain of the timber is still relatively closed. with planed timber the grain is more open. selct your timber and stand it in a tub of preservative so that it creeps up the grain internally by capilliary action. If you can get treated timber in 2x1 then so much better.

Malc

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steady eddy
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Re: Wood protection

Postby steady eddy » 14 Mar 2013, 8:43am

Cuprinol 5 star is the bench mark timber treatment in a can - but it is very expensive. Creosote is very effective and a lot cheaper but more difficult to come by these days at it is carcinogenic.

pstallwood
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Re: Wood protection

Postby pstallwood » 14 Mar 2013, 9:05am

Creosote is illegal to use unless you are a "professional", see:-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/biocides/copr/creosote.htm

The local DIY shop won't have it.

Peter

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Si
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Re: Wood protection

Postby Si » 14 Mar 2013, 9:14am

pstallwood wrote:Creosote is illegal to use unless you are a "professional", see:-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/biocides/copr/creosote.htm

The local DIY shop won't have it.

Peter


Blimey, my mum's local DIY shop has gallons of the stuff - I've been painting her fence, and myself, with it all summer!

pstallwood
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Re: Wood protection

Postby pstallwood » 14 Mar 2013, 3:01pm

Buy some now and keep quiet about it! I would if I knew where the shop is.

Peter

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fausto copy
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Re: Wood protection

Postby fausto copy » 14 Mar 2013, 4:59pm

I bought a large can of Langlow wood preservative approx. 30 years ago.
Didn't use much and the can was languishing on the top shelf in my garage for the next 15 years or so.
When we returned from holiday one weekend, I wondered what the awful stink was and realised that the can had rusted through. The preservative had run all along the 3 wooden shelves below.
Needless to say that the shelves are still as good as new. :)
I managed to save quite a bit of the preservative and put it into a glass jar.
As I'm about to plant some fence posts in the ground, I've today liberally soaked the timbers with the rest of the Langlow.
Don't suppose they still sell it these days, but mine turned out to be a bit of a bargain. :wink:

ambodach
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Re: Wood protection

Postby ambodach » 15 Mar 2013, 10:13pm

I use creosote and stand the wood in a tub and brush it on frequently for a couple of days. Has certainly worked for some years now -at least 15 I think. The stuff you are not allowed to use is proper creosote of course and not the substitute stuff you get nowadays which to be fair still seems to work. I use it for stobs(fence posts) and a deer fence I had to build as well as a myriad of posts around the garden.

eclipse
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Re: Wood protection

Postby eclipse » 20 Mar 2013, 8:28pm

daft though it might seem, google glycol antifreeze as a wood preservative; some swear by it,s antifungal properties. some fellow also rated it as effective treatment for fungal toenail infetions. By the way, I accept no responsibility for any localised envionmental/ medical catastrophies!