TV licensing...

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Psamathe
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Re: TV licensing...

Postby Psamathe » 18 Feb 2020, 12:13pm

[XAP]Bob wrote:Because they make a profit from some of their shows using the “worldwide” arm - and that helps fund their less profitable businesses.

But why should BBC require a compulsory subscription to fund this whereas ITV, C4, Sky, etc. have to manage by persuading customers to subscribe.

Ian

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: TV licensing...

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 18 Feb 2020, 12:24pm

Hi,
Yes!
Why does a company demand payment to watch live broadcast that could be made in another country and nothing to do with this country or the company that imposes this fee on over 30 million people?

It all sounds rather dictatorship or even Victorian doesn't it?

can you imagine any other company organisation anywhere in the world that can do this.
Unless it was for the well-being of all people.
Taxes pay for the well-being of all of us.
BBC licence fee Should simply be for people who want to watch BBC stuff.
If the BBC licence fee is for all broadcast live material then surely they should be handing over of a portion of it to the other broadcasting firms?
NA Thinks Just End 2 End Return + Bivvy
You'll Still Find Me At The Top Of A Hill
Please forgive the poor Grammar I blame it on my mobile and phat thinkers.

Psamathe
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Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:56pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby Psamathe » 18 Feb 2020, 12:33pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:.....
If the BBC licence fee is for all broadcast live material then surely they should be handing over of a portion of it to the other broadcasting firms?

Which would enable a more diverse range of less profitable programs to be created through a broader range of companies.

Of course the BBC might have to reduce some of their salaries e.g. £1,750,000 to one "star" or £1,250,000 to another (2018-2019 figures, although the £1,250,000 was for 9 months not a full 12 months)).

Good use of license fee money?

Ian

mercalia
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Location: london South

Re: TV licensing...

Postby mercalia » 18 Feb 2020, 1:33pm

Psamathe wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:.....
If the BBC licence fee is for all broadcast live material then surely they should be handing over of a portion of it to the other broadcasting firms?

Which would enable a more diverse range of less profitable programs to be created through a broader range of companies.

Of course the BBC might have to reduce some of their salaries e.g. £1,750,000 to one "star" or £1,250,000 to another (2018-2019 figures, although the £1,250,000 was for 9 months not a full 12 months)).

Good use of license fee money?

Ian


The BBC wears 2 hats - one as the regulator, collecting fees for live broadcasting reception, and the other as a programme maker. As i said before it is legalised fingers in the till?

If I was Boris I would strip the BBC of the regulator role.
Last edited by mercalia on 18 Feb 2020, 1:37pm, edited 3 times in total.

fullupandslowingdown
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Re: TV licensing...

Postby fullupandslowingdown » 18 Feb 2020, 1:34pm

It's always good to have some cheerful news to report, such as the news that wages, after stripping out the effect of inflation, have finally squeaked above their level in March 2008. In other words, your wage can finally buy a little bit more than it could before the banking crisis. So let's celebrate. Hooray.

Now let's home in on the amounts. The average wage excluding bonuses is now £511.61. In March 2008, the average wage would have bought you £510.96 (in 2019 prices). In other words you are 65p better off than you were - 12 years ago.

Well whoop-de-doo. There's always a half-full or a half-empty angle on wage increases. But to many workers, this minor economic landmark will serve less as a cause for celebration and more as a reminder that the past decade has been the worst for improvements in living standards in more than 200 years.

The 2008 crisis, caused by reckless mismanagement of the banks for which no-one has been punished, is one reason (not the only one) that the average pay packet has failed to do what we used to take for granted - i.e. increase by more than inflation.

It used to happen every year. Low-pay think tank the Resolution Foundation points out that if pre-crisis trends for increases in pay in real terms had continued, the average wage would now be £141 a week higher.

Andy Verity BBC economics correspondent https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51543521

Sounds like he is expecting to be the next job casualty.

mercalia
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Location: london South

Re: TV licensing...

Postby mercalia » 18 Feb 2020, 1:42pm

fullupandslowingdown wrote:
It's always good to have some cheerful news to report, such as the news that wages, after stripping out the effect of inflation, have finally squeaked above their level in March 2008. In other words, your wage can finally buy a little bit more than it could before the banking crisis. So let's celebrate. Hooray.

Now let's home in on the amounts. The average wage excluding bonuses is now £511.61. In March 2008, the average wage would have bought you £510.96 (in 2019 prices). In other words you are 65p better off than you were - 12 years ago.

Well whoop-de-doo. There's always a half-full or a half-empty angle on wage increases. But to many workers, this minor economic landmark will serve less as a cause for celebration and more as a reminder that the past decade has been the worst for improvements in living standards in more than 200 years.

The 2008 crisis, caused by reckless mismanagement of the banks for which no-one has been punished, is one reason (not the only one) that the average pay packet has failed to do what we used to take for granted - i.e. increase by more than inflation.

It used to happen every year. Low-pay think tank the Resolution Foundation points out that if pre-crisis trends for increases in pay in real terms had continued, the average wage would now be £141 a week higher.

Andy Verity BBC economics correspondent https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51543521

Sounds like he is expecting to be the next job casualty.


I suspect the reason we have such hign employment is the fear of being processed by the Universal Credit system? So people will take any job to avoid falling foul of that demon

fullupandslowingdown
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Re: TV licensing...

Postby fullupandslowingdown » 18 Feb 2020, 2:46pm

The employment figures include self employment and zero hours contracts.
The unemployment figures exclude the long term sick, and people who haven't signed on or have being sanctioned and struck off. But of course, according to official figures there are only a few thousand rough sleepers in the UK.

merseymouth
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Re: TV licensing...

Postby merseymouth » 18 Feb 2020, 6:04pm

Hello all, Well, I've just managed to get the Government to pay for TV Licence for the future?
Yep being a really poor pensioner the penny dropped for me to apply for my Married Persons Tax Allowance! Roughly £250 per annum it covers the £156 blood money quite nicely 8) .
One of us has to be a non tax payer, with the other paying standard rate Tax, we is so in our case. SWMBO pay tax on her occupational pension & state pension, whereas my state pension is way short of the tax threshold. 8) 8) 8) 8)
We also get around £1'000 in back dated relief. That will help to keep a roof over our daughter's head, much needed!
And I'm not even having to wait until I turn 75 for HMG to pull away the bone :wink: . MM

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: TV licensing...

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 13 Mar 2020, 9:37am

Hi,
Just been watching on BBC politics a short clip from Culture Commons Committee. Questioning Hall (Lord Muck) And two of his disciples (Hench man and Hench woman).
The question was posed to Hall if you thought it was appropriate to send 80 and 90-year-olds to jail for non-payment of license.
Barely a few words before his Hench people took over, to save him from putting his foot right in it.
Quizzed whether the wording of letters which warn about impending prosecutions et cetera et cetera, they said we have special people To deal with older licence fee payers?
And the letter which threatens court action et cetera is that the tail end of the procedure in sending out letters to tell prospective fee payers to either buy a license or sign a Disclosure Will not watch BBC stuff et cetera.
When quizzed again about sending old people to jail for non-payment of license fee, second Hench person was very adamant and aggressive in saying that the BBC do not send people to jail a judge does.
You're very typical ducking diving and polishing of seats In a way that can only be described as their lives are being threatened :roll:
NA Thinks Just End 2 End Return + Bivvy
You'll Still Find Me At The Top Of A Hill
Please forgive the poor Grammar I blame it on my mobile and phat thinkers.

carpetcleaner
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Joined: 14 Nov 2019, 1:25pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby carpetcleaner » 13 Mar 2020, 12:39pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Just been watching on BBC politics a short clip from Culture Commons Committee. Questioning Hall (Lord Muck) And two of his disciples (Hench man and Hench woman).
The question was posed to Hall if you thought it was appropriate to send 80 and 90-year-olds to jail for non-payment of license.
Barely a few words before his Hench people took over, to save him from putting his foot right in it.
Quizzed whether the wording of letters which warn about impending prosecutions et cetera et cetera, they said we have special people To deal with older licence fee payers?
And the letter which threatens court action et cetera is that the tail end of the procedure in sending out letters to tell prospective fee payers to either buy a license or sign a Disclosure Will not watch BBC stuff et cetera.
When quizzed again about sending old people to jail for non-payment of license fee, second Hench person was very adamant and aggressive in saying that the BBC do not send people to jail a judge does.
You're very typical ducking diving and polishing of seats In a way that can only be described as their lives are being threatened :roll:



Livelihoods, not lives. The BBC's staff are amongst the corporation's biggest fans and some of the most ardent proponents of the licence fee system.

They fully support the criminal law system chasing poor people for money for their wages, wages that are much more generous than those of the people they serve and of the people convicted of non-payment of the licence fee.

pete75
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Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby pete75 » 13 Mar 2020, 12:54pm

carpetcleaner wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Just been watching on BBC politics a short clip from Culture Commons Committee. Questioning Hall (Lord Muck) And two of his disciples (Hench man and Hench woman).
The question was posed to Hall if you thought it was appropriate to send 80 and 90-year-olds to jail for non-payment of license.
Barely a few words before his Hench people took over, to save him from putting his foot right in it.
Quizzed whether the wording of letters which warn about impending prosecutions et cetera et cetera, they said we have special people To deal with older licence fee payers?
And the letter which threatens court action et cetera is that the tail end of the procedure in sending out letters to tell prospective fee payers to either buy a license or sign a Disclosure Will not watch BBC stuff et cetera.
When quizzed again about sending old people to jail for non-payment of license fee, second Hench person was very adamant and aggressive in saying that the BBC do not send people to jail a judge does.
You're very typical ducking diving and polishing of seats In a way that can only be described as their lives are being threatened :roll:



Livelihoods, not lives. The BBC's staff are amongst the corporation's biggest fans and some of the most ardent proponents of the licence fee system.

They fully support the criminal law system chasing poor people for money for their wages, wages that are much more generous than those of the people they serve and of the people convicted of non-payment of the licence fee.


Every MP, public sector employee, private business providing services to the public sector rely on the criminal law system chasing people for money to pay them. Essentially income tax is extracted by force. Don't pay it you end up in court by force if you don't go voluntarily. Then you may be imprisoned , again by force.

fullupandslowingdown
Posts: 472
Joined: 11 Oct 2007, 5:47pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby fullupandslowingdown » 13 Mar 2020, 1:27pm

......Every MP, public sector employee, private business providing services to the public sector rely on the criminal law system chasing people for money to pay them. Essentially income tax is extracted by force. Don't pay it you end up in court by force if you don't go voluntarily. Then you may be imprisoned , again by force........


Ah but don't forget everyone, we voted by a majority for our government, so the majority of us condone if not actively support the present system of criminal sentences for debt owed to the state and her allies, but only civil remedies for debt owed to private individuals. That's civilised democracy in action.

carpetcleaner
Posts: 390
Joined: 14 Nov 2019, 1:25pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby carpetcleaner » 13 Mar 2020, 1:34pm

mercalia wrote:
Psamathe wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:.....
If the BBC licence fee is for all broadcast live material then surely they should be handing over of a portion of it to the other broadcasting firms?

Which would enable a more diverse range of less profitable programs to be created through a broader range of companies.

Of course the BBC might have to reduce some of their salaries e.g. £1,750,000 to one "star" or £1,250,000 to another (2018-2019 figures, although the £1,250,000 was for 9 months not a full 12 months)).

Good use of license fee money?

Ian


The BBC wears 2 hats - one as the regulator, collecting fees for live broadcasting reception, and the other as a programme maker. As i said before it is legalised fingers in the till?

If I was Boris I would strip the BBC of the regulator role.


The BBC is not the regulator of the licence fee system. The government is. The law requires that people pay the state for permission to watch live TV and it requires that the BBC collects the money. The government uses the BBC as a tax collector. The level of the tax is decided by the government. The money collected goes to the government, not the BBC. The BBC is run using money given to it by the government, just like the NHS, the army, the civil service etc.

In addition to all this government involvement in the BBC's financial affairs it also appoints nearly all of the BBC's governing body.

Psamathe
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Joined: 10 Jan 2014, 8:56pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby Psamathe » 13 Mar 2020, 1:38pm

carpetcleaner wrote:
mercalia wrote:
Psamathe wrote:Which would enable a more diverse range of less profitable programs to be created through a broader range of companies.

Of course the BBC might have to reduce some of their salaries e.g. £1,750,000 to one "star" or £1,250,000 to another (2018-2019 figures, although the £1,250,000 was for 9 months not a full 12 months)).

Good use of license fee money?

Ian


The BBC wears 2 hats - one as the regulator, collecting fees for live broadcasting reception, and the other as a programme maker. As i said before it is legalised fingers in the till?

If I was Boris I would strip the BBC of the regulator role.


The BBC is not the regulator of the licence fee system. The government is. The law requires that people pay the state for permission to watch live TV and it requires that the BBC collects the money. The government uses the BBC as a tax collector. The level of the tax is decided by the government. The money collected goes to the government, not the BBC. The BBC is run using money given to it by the government, just like the NHS, the army, the civil service etc.

In addition to all this government involvement in the BBC's financial affairs it also appoints nearly all of the BBC's governing body.

The BBC lobbies for license fee to be kept and increased. Government just does the BBC's bidding.

Ian

carpetcleaner
Posts: 390
Joined: 14 Nov 2019, 1:25pm

Re: TV licensing...

Postby carpetcleaner » 13 Mar 2020, 2:03pm

pete75 wrote:
carpetcleaner wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Just been watching on BBC politics a short clip from Culture Commons Committee. Questioning Hall (Lord Muck) And two of his disciples (Hench man and Hench woman).
The question was posed to Hall if you thought it was appropriate to send 80 and 90-year-olds to jail for non-payment of license.
Barely a few words before his Hench people took over, to save him from putting his foot right in it.
Quizzed whether the wording of letters which warn about impending prosecutions et cetera et cetera, they said we have special people To deal with older licence fee payers?
And the letter which threatens court action et cetera is that the tail end of the procedure in sending out letters to tell prospective fee payers to either buy a license or sign a Disclosure Will not watch BBC stuff et cetera.
When quizzed again about sending old people to jail for non-payment of license fee, second Hench person was very adamant and aggressive in saying that the BBC do not send people to jail a judge does.
You're very typical ducking diving and polishing of seats In a way that can only be described as their lives are being threatened :roll:



Livelihoods, not lives. The BBC's staff are amongst the corporation's biggest fans and some of the most ardent proponents of the licence fee system.

They fully support the criminal law system chasing poor people for money for their wages, wages that are much more generous than those of the people they serve and of the people convicted of non-payment of the licence fee.


Every MP, public sector employee, private business providing services to the public sector rely on the criminal law system chasing people for money to pay them. Essentially income tax is extracted by force. Don't pay it you end up in court by force if you don't go voluntarily. Then you may be imprisoned , again by force.


I support the criminal sanctions for those who don't pay the taxes which go towards essential public services like the NHS, education, the police, benefits etc.

I see no reason for a compulsory tax backed by criminal sanctions to fund Eastenders, 4 national pop music radio stations and huge amounts of junk TV already provided by commercial broadcasters.

The BBC's staff know that my attitude is increasingly common, and so they are fighting hard to keep their easy access to our money.