food for free - friend or foe?

Use this board for general non-cycling-related chat, or to introduce yourself to the forum.
brynpoeth
Posts: 9054
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

food for free - friend or foe?

Postby brynpoeth » 24 Apr 2015, 3:58pm

I love collecting wild fruit - cherries in July, plums and apples later, "Sanddorn" (Hippophae rhamnoides /common sea-buckthorn) in winter! It is best to get off the bike and walk, then one is slow enough to spot the trees.

Unfortunately there is a web site here in Germany where one can record places where wild fruit is to be had.

I fear some of "my" trees were publicised, the trees were almost bare of fruit when I visited them. I suspect people go there with vehicles and ladders, and collect much more than they can eat.

This is one (rare?) case where it does not make sense to join up with like-minded people.
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras & STOP signs!

Vorpal
Moderator
Posts: 16312
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 3:34pm
Location: Not there ;)

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby Vorpal » 24 Apr 2015, 4:01pm

In Norway, there is allemannsretten, or 'every man's right' to use the forest for walking, camping and collecting berries and mushrooms. But Norwegians fiercely protect the locations of their favorite spots, especially if there is a rare mushroom or berry to be found there. It is considered quite rude to ask someone where they go berry picking or mushroom hunting. 8)
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

brynpoeth
Posts: 9054
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby brynpoeth » 24 Apr 2015, 4:11pm

Vorpal wrote:In Norway, there is allemannsretten, or 'every man's right' to use the forest for walking, camping and collecting berries and mushrooms. But Norwegians fiercely protect the locations of their favorite spots, especially if there is a rare mushroom or berry to be found there. It is considered quite rude to ask someone where they go berry picking or mushroom hunting. 8)


one used to say: "please do not ask for credit as a refusal often offends", it is the same here I guess, and journalists should not disclose their sources (sauces?)
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras & STOP signs!

RogerThat
Posts: 831
Joined: 9 Dec 2014, 2:47pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby RogerThat » 24 Apr 2015, 4:12pm

Same thing in Scotland. The location of mountain bothies is guarded with some secrecy, as they like to keep occupation to a minimum. Sometimes they can be right in front of you and you just can't see them for the trees or the brow of a hill.

I think it's a good practice, if you find something that you cherish, keep it to yourself!!

RogerThat
Posts: 831
Joined: 9 Dec 2014, 2:47pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby RogerThat » 24 Apr 2015, 4:13pm

Also, in the north of Norway, among the Samii people it is considered exceptionally rude to ask a family how many reindeer they own :lol:

maxcherry
Posts: 664
Joined: 22 Mar 2011, 5:53pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby maxcherry » 24 Apr 2015, 5:32pm

In Birmingham it all depends on how slow the security guards are :roll:
Honestly chaps, I'm a female!

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 8192
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby 661-Pete » 24 Apr 2015, 5:44pm

Well... I'm not about to give away the whereabouts of my favourite wild mushroom localities, so if anyone was expecting that - forget it :twisted: ! Having said that, I often go mushrooming in the autumn and, regrettably, I often see evidence an area having been 'cleaned out' by others before me... :( Not to mention the guy I came across, a few years ago, in the car park next to some woodland in the Crawley area, blithely loading up the back of his white van with basketfuls of goodies evidently gathered for the restaurant trade...

In some parts of the country (e.g. Epping Forest, Wimbledon Common) mushroom-picking is strictly regulated, so watch it!

And there's the notorious case of Brigitte Tee-Hillman, prosecuted several times but they've never managed to make a charge stick. What she does goes against the whole spirit of foraging for food in the wild, i.e. collecting enough for your own use and your own use only :evil: . Don't know whether she's still in the business, but people like that ought to be stopped.
Pete

Et qui rit des curés d'Oc?/De Meuse raines, houp! de cloques./De quelles loques ce turque coin./Et ne d'anes ni rennes,/Ecuries des curés d'Oc. - Louis d'Antin

User avatar
661-Pete
Posts: 8192
Joined: 22 Nov 2012, 8:45pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby 661-Pete » 24 Apr 2015, 5:46pm

RogerThat wrote:Also, in the north of Norway, among the Samii people it is considered exceptionally rude to ask a family how many reindeer they own :lol:
Especially if the guy is short and fat, with a bushy white beard and wearing a red coat and pointy hat...
Pete

Et qui rit des curés d'Oc?/De Meuse raines, houp! de cloques./De quelles loques ce turque coin./Et ne d'anes ni rennes,/Ecuries des curés d'Oc. - Louis d'Antin

fluffybunnyuk
Posts: 450
Joined: 1 Sep 2013, 10:58pm
Contact:

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby fluffybunnyuk » 28 Apr 2015, 3:05pm

i have a nice camping spot i deliberately drop seeds in. its usually good to hit for veg when i camp there.

RogerThat
Posts: 831
Joined: 9 Dec 2014, 2:47pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby RogerThat » 29 Apr 2015, 9:24am

I've tried that in the highlands. Nothing lasts more than one single summer!!

Tangled Metal
Posts: 4544
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 8:32pm

Re: food for free - friend or foe?

Postby Tangled Metal » 29 Apr 2015, 9:32am

RogerThat wrote:Same thing in Scotland. The location of mountain bothies is guarded with some secrecy, as they like to keep occupation to a minimum. Sometimes they can be right in front of you and you just can't see them for the trees or the brow of a hill.


Closely guarded secret indeed. This link is for just one area, the main region map can be used to search for them all around Scotland, Wales and northern England. This has been up and running for I think 6 years now. Before that you had to know someone in the mountain bothy association to get a photocopy of their list or just join it. They are still doing well despite opening up their bothy locations.

http://www.mountainbothies.org.uk/region.asp?region_id=5