Touring HELP!

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
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horizon
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby horizon » 19 May 2017, 12:06pm

Vorpal wrote:I found these in 3 minutes with google, so there are likely more.


Well there you go . . .

I think we made some assumptions about what the OP had found out. I personally would prefer not to hire for a tour but the OP had already swallowed that so it would be good to hear what he/she thinks. Unless of course racks are still a no-no (if they are). I have this sneaking suspicion but I could be quite wrong . . .
Bikes belong on trains.

simonhill
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby simonhill » 19 May 2017, 6:07pm

Everyone just talks about sweating with a backpack. I think it is potentially more serious than that.

The back is a major area for losing heat from an overheated body. Covering it up with what is in effect a thick heavy 'coat' could easily lead to overheating.

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Gattonero
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby Gattonero » 19 May 2017, 7:01pm

simonhill wrote:Everyone just talks about sweating with a backpack. I think it is potentially more serious than that.

The back is a major area for losing heat from an overheated body. Covering it up with what is in effect a thick heavy 'coat' could easily lead to overheating.


Milions of people have used backpacks in places where the sun hits 40ºc or more, and I've never known any to die because of the backpack.
Surely not convenient, certainly not "serious". In fact, a Camelback is a means to carry 2.5lt of water and keeping it cool.
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...

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Gattonero
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby Gattonero » 19 May 2017, 7:29pm

mjr wrote:
horizon wrote:But if it's Andalucia in the summer - how much stuff do you actually need?

Food, water, bug spray, sun spray, first aid kit and some clothes, I guess. The water will be in bottle cages and you could probably cram food and sprays into a tri bag, but then there's clothes and first aid kit. Ideally tools, as waiting by a road for hire company recovery/replacement sucks in those temperatures (BTDTGTTS)....


It needs very little when using B&B and getting food from the road side. I'd say that 10lt of capacity is more than enough.

Food?
Assuming they are not cooking and not having particular allergies it's "emergency food" then.
-small bag of dried fruit like figs/apricots/dates
-a couple of oat bars (no chocolate in the summer!)
-may share a jar of peanut butter and bread between the group

Water?
Plan your water points and refill every time there is a chance.
2 big bottles on the bike, wrapped with the metallized-foil sold for the back of radiators, will be enough

First aid?
Check everyone's needs, allergies, etc. and write down the phone numbers of A&E/hospitals that are closer to the route.
All this gets as big as a men's wallet, no more:
-a couple of plasters
-a couple of medical cleansing wipes
-adhesive stiching
-a couple of insect-repellent wipes, or a small spray (to share)
-eye drops
-a couple of caplets of each: Paracetamol, Ibuprofen, Hayfever tablets, Painkillers

Clothes?
That depends a lot on everyone's body temperature, plus the chances of washing facilities. On top of what already wearing (shorts, jersey, socks, cycling shoes) I would carry:
-1 spare light jersey
-1 spare underwear
-1 spare socks
-1 merino baselayer
-1 light rain jacket
In hot weather having a full set of waterproofs makes no sense, it never gets really cold and good fabrics will dry quick, it's important to keep the torso dry and protected from wind

Bike tools?
As above, we all have different needs, and again I recommend for thorough checkup of the bike before leaving, replacing everything that is borderline to a problem. This means no major spares and tools to carry, less hassle, more time for riding and keeping on the roadbook.
I.e. I do not carry spare spokes. Travelling light, keeping an eye on the road for potholes, lifting the bum off the saddle when it needs to (rough terrain, potholes, kerbs, drains, etc.), using good quality wheels; it all makes for 25years when I've never broken a spoke and I don't see why they should.
A well-built 32 or 36h rim and spokes will give no trouble for years if correctly used, yet easy to service if a shop is en-route.
I carry only what needs to deal with common problem that can happen: puncture, quick adjust of gears, brakes or saddle/bars; it all packs down the size of the smallest saddle bag, imagine 3 iphones stacked.
This is what I carry:
-multitool with 2-8mm allen keys, T25 and chain tool
-small pump with presta&schrader adapter, a length of gaffer tape rolled around has many uses (tyre boot, for example)
-a valve extender and the little plastic tool for the valve core, plus a spare valve core
-self adhesive patches
-two tyre levers
-a gear wire (doubles as an emergency brake wire)
-a container of eye drops (or single-use soy sauce as found in packed sushi) with oil just enough for one chain
-3 nitrile gloves
-2 chain links
You may add 2/3 zipties and two M5x20 bolts just in case.


All of the above would easily fit here. No racks needed, just loop two straps and off you go
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It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...

ossie
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby ossie » 19 May 2017, 8:38pm

simonhill wrote:Everyone just talks about sweating with a backpack. I think it is potentially more serious than that.

The back is a major area for losing heat from an overheated body. Covering it up with what is in effect a thick heavy 'coat' could easily lead to overheating.


I did an earlier link to Deuter rucksacks where it sits off the back and allows airflow, more so on a bike. That aside how do the Army and Royal Marines get on yomping miles in all sorts of heat with Bergens? Just a thought, well not really as I'm staring at one of the torture devices now :D

simonhill
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby simonhill » 20 May 2017, 10:28am

Gattonero wrote:
simonhill wrote:Everyone just talks about sweating with a backpack. I think it is potentially more serious than that.

The back is a major area for losing heat from an overheated body. Covering it up with what is in effect a thick heavy 'coat' could easily lead to overheating.


Milions of people have used backpacks in places where the sun hits 40ºc or more, and I've never known any to die because of the backpack.
Surely not convenient, certainly not "serious". In fact, a Camelback is a means to carry 2.5lt of water and keeping it cool.


I didn't say anyone directly died when cycling with a backpack but overheating is a serious problem, particularly if you are not used to cycling in hot weather.

I do most of my cycling (as in months each year) in temps of over 30°, sometimes over 35 and occasionally over 40. To me the two most important things are protecting myself from the sun by covering up; and allowing airflow to keep me as cool as possible. Plus of course plenty of fluids. Personally I wouldn't recommend a camelback in very​ hot climates, but each to their own.

Similarly to the back, I think I the head is important. In Australia where helmets are compulsory I found wearing one very uncomfortable in high temperatures, particularly when climbing. I have no idea if I was overheating, but my head felt unpleasantly hot and I usually took it off and put on a hat.

I would just recommend people cycling in very hot climates not to wear a backpack, but what do I know, I'm not a physiologist, just a cyclist.

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Gattonero
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Re: Touring HELP!

Postby Gattonero » 20 May 2017, 10:51am

I come from south Italy, in the summer you want to be home by 9:30am unless you are well prepared with plenty of water and very fit to withstand the scorching sun.
Absolutely agree with you on many points, though a decent helmet lets the air flow in a significant way and the foam (as long as the outer is white or another light colour) does actually insulate from the sun
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best,
since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.
Thus you remember them as they actually are...