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Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 5:06pm
by Online
On the first leg of the journey I'd suggest making some small deviations to pass through, rather than by, Eye, Hoxne and Bungay. They're all delightful.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 5:16pm
by TRM
Online wrote:On the first leg of the journey I'd suggest making some small deviations to pass through, rather than by, Eye, Hoxne and Bungay. They're all delightful.


Thanks, route updated!

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 5:36pm
by fastpedaller
If the RAF centenary interests you at all there are history boards and scale model aeroplanes on telegraph poles at the locations of 40 airfields used during the wars - the one at Langham is just by the 'training dome' which is well worth a visit. As a cafe frequenting person I'll add the info that I've never found anywhere in Hunstanton which offers even reasonable food at anything other than mortgage prices - the restaurant/cafe at the Lavender Centre at Heacham does good food though!

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 7:32pm
by mjr
fastpedaller wrote:As a cafe frequenting person I'll add the info that I've never found anywhere in Hunstanton which offers even reasonable food at anything other than mortgage prices - the restaurant/cafe at the Lavender Centre at Heacham does good food though!

Well, I'd stop in the north coast villages instead, but The Old Lifeboat House in Old Hunstanton and The Salad Bowl on Hunstanton Cliffs are our most frequent haunts there. I don't remember either being very expensive. Fish and chips from a blue bar on the Greevegate side of this, I think were OK, too, but I've not tried enough to know if they're the best.

Norfolk Lavender is OK but a nuisance to get to from Route 1 (busy roads or detours) and likely to be very busy on a holiday weekend.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 7:51pm
by geocycle
mjr wrote:Route 1 is a good introduction to the area except for short sand sections near Wells and on Marriott's Way, which you should find how to avoid by searching my previous posts. Other than that, most roads are good cycling except A and not-built-up B roads without cycling infrastructure. Even those can be tolerable for short stretches to link things up, such as to get from Roydon to get to Castle Rising or across the Rudhams. I live here: ask if you'd like me to suggest a route (let me know stopping points or daily distances) or opinions on one you've planned.


I’d definitely avoid the stretch of route 1 through the Holkham estate near Wells if I were to do it again. It was very sandy through a nature reserve and almost unrideable. Deep sand grabbed the front wheel bringing a fully laden tourer to sudden halts.

The scones at Felbrigg Hall were substantial!

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 8:06pm
by jgurney
mjr wrote:Mile 89 - if you like old trains, it may be worth the 2 extra miles to detour up to Weybourne and back, riding past the well-preserved NNR station and maybe see a train.


It is also possible to take bikes on the steam train between Holt and Sheringham, and see the spacious guard's vans that used to be available on main line services, if you don't feel a need to have pedalled throughout.

Those interested in trains might also like to visit the Wells and Walsingham Light Railway, probably the world's longest 7-inch gauge line.

A little further south is the Bure Valley Railway, whose ability to carry 4 bikes on each of their little 2ft gauge trains should embarras those full-size operators able to carry only 2.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 9:11pm
by mjr
geocycle wrote:I’d definitely avoid the stretch of route 1 through the Holkham estate near Wells if I were to do it again. It was very sandy through a nature reserve and almost unrideable. Deep sand grabbed the front wheel bringing a fully laden tourer to sudden halts.

The only bit through the Holkham estate to be sand is the coast dunes. They're easily avoided by using the hospital gate into the estate like I suggested or even the coast road A149 all the way to the main gate at quieter times of the year. I guess whoever decided the Sustrans routing prioritised seeing the beautiful coast over actually being rideable! :-(

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 9:50pm
by brynpoeth
jgurney wrote:
mjr wrote:Mile 89 - if you like old trains, it may be worth the 2 extra miles to detour up to Weybourne and back, riding past the well-preserved NNR station and maybe see a train.


It is also possible to take bikes on the steam train between Holt and Sheringham, and see the spacious guard's vans that used to be available on main line services, if you don't feel a need to have pedalled throughout.

Those interested in trains might also like to visit the Wells and Walsingham Light Railway, probably the world's longest 7-inch gauge line.

A little further south is the Bure Valley Railway, whose ability to carry 4 bikes on each of their little 2ft gauge trains should embarras those full-size operators able to carry only 2.

Wiki says the WWLR is 10.25" gauge :wink:

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 10:00pm
by F70100
If you did fancy fish & chips in Hunstanton I can recommend Fishers, opposite the Tourist Office at the top of the green. I ‘ve been there twice in the last month and they were great on both occasions.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 10:05pm
by brynpoeth
Is there a big problem with close encounters of the agricultural kind ATM?

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 10:15pm
by fastpedaller
mjr wrote:
fastpedaller wrote:As a cafe frequenting person I'll add the info that I've never found anywhere in Hunstanton which offers even reasonable food at anything other than mortgage prices - the restaurant/cafe at the Lavender Centre at Heacham does good food though!

Well, I'd stop in the north coast villages instead, but The Old Lifeboat House in Old Hunstanton and The Salad Bowl on Hunstanton Cliffs are our most frequent haunts there. I don't remember either being very expensive. Fish and chips from a blue bar on the Greevegate side of this, I think were OK, too, but I've not tried enough to know if they're the best.

Norfolk Lavender is OK but a nuisance to get to from Route 1 (busy roads or detours) and likely to be very busy on a holiday weekend.


Thanks for the tip - I'll have to hunt out the Old LBH and Salad Bowl, I've not seen them, but It's not a regular trip of mine, as it's over 90miles round trip.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 15 Aug 2018, 11:11pm
by mjr
brynpoeth wrote:Is there a big problem with close encounters of the agricultural kind ATM?

Not in North Norfolk because most roads are either fairly straight and open or too small for big machinery so they drive along field edges. The twisty roads of mid Norfolk and Breckland can hide big farm machinery more often, while West Norfolk and Suffolk has more beet traffic but I think that's a month or so away.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 16 Aug 2018, 7:28am
by jgurney
brynpoeth wrote:
jgurney wrote:
the Wells and Walsingham Light Railway, probably the world's longest 7-inch gauge line.


Wiki says the WWLR is 10.25" gauge :wink:


Oops! Absolutely right. Thanks.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 16 Aug 2018, 7:50am
by sjs
As a major pilgrimage destination Walsingham is interesting independently of the WWLR, and has a few reasonable eating places.

Re: North Norfolk Coastline

Posted: 16 Aug 2018, 9:09am
by mjr
sjs wrote:As a major pilgrimage destination Walsingham is interesting independently of the WWLR, and has a few reasonable eating places.

True. Personally, I don't think it's that interesting if you're not of one of the religions there (Snettisham church, Lynn Minster and Lynn's St Nicholas Chapel are all more impressive IMO) but some might like to visit. The pie barn and Norton Rooms are both good food stops, although the pies are much bigger.