Parish Churches

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Cyril Haearn
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cyril Haearn » 28 Aug 2018, 11:12am

Aviation history alert!
Heard about the first biplane (German: Doppeldecker, double-decker) that set off from Berlin destination Schwerin, the pilot followed the railway line but at Hagenow two lines branched off, she did not know which to follow
So she landed in a suitable field and asked the way
Then ten strong men were recruited to hold the plane steady while the motors were revved up (they had to reverse their caps as the draught would have blown them off), at a signal they let go and after 50 m the plane was airborne (c 1911). The helpers were not paid but they had a story to tell their grandchildren

Little-known fact: gliding is popular in Germany, after Ww1 powered flying was restricted
The longest glide was from Luebeck to Bordeaux. Not sure how the pilot + plane got home :wink:
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Cyril Haearn
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cyril Haearn » 28 Aug 2018, 11:19am

Mick F wrote:..
..
The very same mate who suggested going to all the parish churches, has said that I should take a photo of myself at each of them. He can get lost! :lol: :lol:
Over two hundred photos of yours truly outside a church? How boring is that! :lol:
..
..

Not boring at all, photos of you in different places, the weather..
Reminds me of a fascinating exhibition of photos of Bus Shelters in the DDR, there was a book too :wink:
Last edited by Cyril Haearn on 28 Aug 2018, 5:13pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Cunobelin
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cunobelin » 28 Aug 2018, 11:24am

Cyril Haearn wrote:Aviation history alert!
Heard about the first biplane (German: Doppeldecker, double-decker) that set off from Berlin destination Schwerin, the pilot followed the railway line but at Hagenow two lines branched off, she did not know which to follow
So she landed in a suitable field and asked the way
Then ten strong men were recruited to hold the plane steady while the motors were revved up (they had to reverse their caps as the draught would have blown them off), at a signal they let go and after 50 m the plane was airborne (c 1911). The helpers were not paid but they had a story to tell their grandchildren

Little-known fact: gliding is popular in Germany, after Ww1 powered flying was restricted
The longest glide was from Luebeck to Bordeaux. Not sure how the pilot + plane got home :wink:



Never mind aviation history, this is FASHION history.....(they had to reverse their caps as the draught would have blown them off)

... and so was born a fashion that has lasted to the present day

Hobbs1951
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Hobbs1951 » 28 Aug 2018, 11:39am

Cunobelin wrote:With regard to the RAF.......

It was in fact the Royal Navy who led the advance guard of military flying!

The home of Military Flying is HMS Sultan in Gosport, or rather Grange Airfield as it was at the time.

As the concept of a military use became more acceptable, there was only two Servicemen flying, a couple of Royal Naval Lieutenants who had built and were flying an aircraft at Grange in Gosport.

A number of Army officers were sent down to Grange, where they were taught to fly, thus starting the pool of pilots that would cascade this training and this expanding care of pilots would become the RFC and RAF

So once again the Royal Navy is the Senior Service when it comes to Aviation

As an aside, I love the fact that

During 1909/10, Vic Hutfield teamed up with three other gentlemen to form the ‘RAS Aeroplane Co, Gosport’, using their names as the initials (Reader, Allen & Sheffield), and Vic Hutfield tried out his own-build monoplane at Grange. He also built the first aircraft hangar at the site in which to house his own aircraft. The monoplane was ready for testing at Grange in July 1910. Several flights got off the ground but landings were rather unsuccessful, with Grange field being unlevel, with potholes & puddles, and damage included breaking the propellor. After awaiting a new propellor for months, when it arrived it had been badly made, and couldn’t be used. Later on, after much fiddling about, a young lad offered to fly the plane, and it flew for several hundred yards, probably because of the light weight of the lad, who later became Air Vice Marshall Lywood.


Again I am familiar, the first RNAS aerodrome was founded in Lincolnshire in 1914 at Killingholme. I think poetic licence is clouding your judgement though !

John.

Hobbs1951
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Hobbs1951 » 28 Aug 2018, 11:40am

Cunobelin wrote:
Cyril Haearn wrote:Never mind aviation history, this is FASHION history.....(they had to reverse their caps as the draught would have blown them off)

... and so was born a fashion that has lasted to the present day


To pioneer motorcyclists wearing a cap that way was called scorcher style.

John.

Hobbs1951
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Hobbs1951 » 28 Aug 2018, 11:44am

Cyril Haearn wrote:The longest glide was from Luebeck to Bordeaux. Not sure how the pilot + plane got home :wink:


Lubeck to Bordeaux, that is a very long glide - over 1500 kms (not sure I believe that) !!!

John.

Cyril Haearn
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cyril Haearn » 28 Aug 2018, 11:53am

Hobbs1951 wrote:
Cyril Haearn wrote:The longest glide was from Luebeck to Bordeaux. Not sure how the pilot + plane got home :wink:


Lubeck to Bordeaux, that is a very long glide - over 1500 kms (not sure I believe that) !!!

John.

Just googled: Die Welt reported that on 25.4.1972 the pilot set out for Nantes, but the wind was so good he reached Biarritz, 1460 km, the glider had a 30 m wingspan
Not sure how the toilet problem was solved or how long the flight took
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Mick F
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Mick F » 28 Aug 2018, 5:09pm

Thread drift? :lol: :lol:
C of E parish churches in Cornwall, to pre WW1 aeroplanes.

My plan is set.
Tomorrow off on my first foray to take in the first of my churches.
First question I will be asking, is what is the parish church called at Stoke Climsland and to which saint is it dedicated?
From what I see at the moment, it's just called "The Parish Church".
https://www.trurodiocese.org.uk/directo ... eaneryid=2
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoke_Climsland
http://opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/q_s/stoke_climsland.php

This website suggests they don't know!
https://www.victoriacountyhistory.ac.uk ... and-church

I'll see what it says on the info board at the church. :wink:
Mick F. Cornwall

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Cunobelin
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cunobelin » 28 Aug 2018, 7:14pm

St ives in Cambridgeshire has a history between aircraft and churches...

Despite many, many miles of open airspace:

Image


Cynically, for some years the adjacent pub was called "The Aviator"

CliveyT
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby CliveyT » 29 Aug 2018, 12:48pm

sjs wrote:No doubt my criteria are different from Mr Jenkins', but I can vouch for the churches at Zennor, Gunwalloe and Breage, and would add the one at Manaccan. Mainly for their locations, for the mermaid at Zennor, and for the high quality of the neighbouring pubs.

Of course there's also a strong Methodist tradition in Cornwall, so when you've finished with the C of E...

Ah but in Cornwall (at least) the pub is next door to the church. Chapel came along later and obviously doesn't have the same alcoholic connection

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Mick F
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Mick F » 29 Aug 2018, 1:01pm

38miles.
3,900ft of ascent.
Eight parish churches.
Four hours.

Left home on Moulton soon before 8am and headed for Calstock. Arrived as the clock in the tower was striking eight.
Four hours later, I made it home having done - in order:
Calstock St Andrew
Callington St Mary
South Hill St Sampson
Linkinhorne St Melor
North Hill St Torney
South Petherwin St Paturnus
Launceston St Mary Magdalene
Stoke Climsland ............... no name, just "parish church". I went inside to check.

Chucked it down for much of the four hours, so came home soaking wet. Good job skin is waterproof!

Photos to prove I've been there. :lol:
However, the light level seemed to upsetting my iPhone5c. Bright white skies with dark granite buildings. Maybe I'd have been better with a dedicated camera. I couldn't get a good shot at Stoke Climsland at all.
Calstock 1.jpg
Callington 2.jpg
South Hill 3.jpg
Linkinhorne 4.jpg
North Hill 5.jpg
South Petherwin 6.jpg
Launceston 7.jpg
Stoke Climsland 8.jpg
Mick F. Cornwall

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Mick F
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Mick F » 29 Aug 2018, 5:20pm

Just planning the next trip for next week.
Landrake, St Germans, Sheviock, Anthony, St John, Millbrook, Maker.
Then cross the Cremyll passenger ferry across to Stonehouse, then have a beer or two at Wetherspoon's, and get the train home from Plymouth. :D

30ish miles of a ride, but the main issue is the A38 main trunk road. Busy and narrow and twisty and hilly and single carriageway.
Landrake is difficult to get to/from without using the A38. I intend to come into it from the north, then after visiting the church, to use the back lanes to the north and A38 a short way to get to Tideford where I can turn south off it for St Germans.
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Lan ... d-4.291773

All roads I've ridden before. :wink:
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Cunobelin
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cunobelin » 29 Aug 2018, 5:55pm

Mick F wrote:Just planning the next trip for next week.
Landrake, St Germans, Sheviock, Anthony, St John, Millbrook, Maker.
Then cross the Cremyll passenger ferry across to Stonehouse, then have a beer or two at Wetherspoon's, and get the train home from Plymouth. :D

30ish miles of a ride, but the main issue is the A38 main trunk road. Busy and narrow and twisty and hilly and single carriageway.
Landrake is difficult to get to/from without using the A38. I intend to come into it from the north, then after visiting the church, to use the back lanes to the north and A38 a short way to get to Tideford where I can turn south off it for St Germans.
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Lan ... d-4.291773

All roads I've ridden before. :wink:



OT.... I know the ferry well, many an afternoon across to Edgcumbe and a couple of pints.... on occasion we even did the planned walk!

Cyril Haearn
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Cyril Haearn » 29 Aug 2018, 5:58pm

Big airports have chapels

How are the religious needs of sailors at sea dealt with, do ships have chapels on board?
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Mick F
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Re: Parish Churches

Postby Mick F » 29 Aug 2018, 7:03pm

Cunobelin wrote:. I know the ferry well, many an afternoon across to Edgcumbe and a couple of pints.... on occasion we even did the planned walk!
It used to have a thatched roof ............ and the building burned down.
Circa early 1980s??
The ship I was in at the time was in and out on trials after refit, and we saw it burning.
http://www.edgcumbearms.co.uk

Some years later, after it was rebuilt and open, we knew the landlady personally. Lady called Mo Laws.
She used to run the Boot Inn in Calstock and Mrs Mick F worked there behind the bar.

------------------------------------------------

Cyril Haearn wrote:How are the religious needs of sailors at sea dealt with, do ships have chapels on board?
At sea, we had services on a Sunday morning, ship's programme allowing. Different denominations were catered for, but it was only on a Sunday if my memory serves me correctly. Often, we had a padre on board, or at least when we had a few ships in convoy on deployment.

Shore bases have churches etc.
Daughter 2 was christened at one at Rosyth back in 1979.

Not a church any more, but a recording studio! :shock:
https://www.substationstudio.net
Mick F. Cornwall