Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
User avatar
Redvee
Posts: 2161
Joined: 8 Mar 2010, 8:58pm

Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Redvee » 24 May 2019, 1:50am

My usual morning theing is to have a coffee at one of the big chains in Bristol and as I'm sat outside there's a gent of more mature years than myself with hs bike leant against the wall of the cafe. We get chatting and he's riding round the coast of Britain wild camping as he goes on a £35 charity shop bought bike. So far he's done the East coast, along the bottom and now going up the West coast and Wales and his navigation device is a road atlas. Today's journey was from Bristol and into South Wales and he'd planned on getting into Wales by going up and around the Severn at Gloucester but with sharing of local knowledge he saved himself 50 miles by heading out of Bristol on the A4/A403 and crossing the river using the old Severn Bridge.

pwa
Posts: 9876
Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby pwa » 24 May 2019, 8:07am

I love the idea of being completely "off grid" with regard to the internet, phones, GPS and all that stuff, at least for a couple of weeks. I suppose it is a bit like going naked, something I've not tried but which I imagine would be unsettling at first but then liberating.

jimlews
Posts: 277
Joined: 11 Jun 2015, 8:36pm

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby jimlews » 24 May 2019, 8:26am

I've used GPO on any number of occasions, but never GPS.

The beauty of a road atlas or O/S maps is that one has a panoramic overview of the territory to be covered and the option of going off at a tangent to explore.

Possibly just my 'old git' propensities, but I dislike the notion of being lead by the nose by some amorphous electronic entity.

Doing without even a map is where real exploration adventures begin...

tatanab
Posts: 3741
Joined: 8 Feb 2007, 12:37pm

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby tatanab » 24 May 2019, 8:28am

Not all people who travel "off grid" are the older generations, like me. I don't need GPS routes to follow or constant phone/internet etc, but I have been humbled a few times by young people I have met when on tour. A chap in his early twenties riding down through France to a destination in Spain - his only map a single sheet showing major cities, he was navigating by compass and said "as long as I am heading south I am happy". On another occasion, near the border between France and Germany, I met group of college age lads going to a music festival in Croatia - no route plan, just a destination and a date to arrive.

pwa
Posts: 9876
Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby pwa » 24 May 2019, 8:33am

There must be a lot of people these days for whom two weeks without any screen to look at would be an adventure in itself. Real "getting away from it" stuff.

Oldjohnw
Posts: 1500
Joined: 16 Oct 2018, 4:23am
Location: Northumberland

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Oldjohnw » 24 May 2019, 8:40am

This old g*t plots a route on his online OS map, prints it off and goes away without electronics part from his emergency £7 unseat phone. I also take a compass.

Like others, I prefer a paper map where I can see the surrounding area, get context to where I am and plan diversions. It is so much more than just getting from A to B.

But each to their own.
John

Cycling and recycling

Marcus Aurelius
Posts: 398
Joined: 1 Feb 2018, 10:20am

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Marcus Aurelius » 24 May 2019, 8:55am

I always pack an OS map and compass, but they’re just there in case the Garmin and phone decide to crap themselves these days.

User avatar
Morzedec
Posts: 61
Joined: 11 Jul 2016, 6:03pm
Location: Cornwall/Deux-Sevres

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Morzedec » 24 May 2019, 11:51am

Bonjour, another 'Old Gent' here (a mere 73).

I now live 95% of the time in France, where I have no car, landline nor mobile, television, washing machine, central heating, nor much else either. What I do have is an acre of fruit trees and veg beds (produce which I swap for wood), plus three bikes and two trailers. My Pavone dates from '74, My Raleigh from '78, and my Holdsworth from '80: by the end of last year one trailer had 50,000km under its single wheel, but if I go out 'wooding' has not enough capacity so I've a new one which rides 'in-line' tandem' behind the first one.

Am I happy? dead right I am, but not as happy as I'll be on Tuesday when I set off back to France again: five and a half days to ride from Roscoff until I reach home (600km), wild camping along the way.

I have a near-neighbour in France (anyone living less than 5km away is a neighbour) who is 88 years young, and he rides out - weather permitting - every day.

Ah, the open road, and at this time of the year - the smell of manure in the fields.

Happy days,
Image Attachments
6.2.2018 (18).JPG

mercalia
Posts: 10854
Joined: 22 Sep 2013, 10:03pm
Location: london South

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby mercalia » 24 May 2019, 12:32pm

you seem to have an internet connection though? :wink:

Mike Sales
Posts: 2920
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Mike Sales » 24 May 2019, 12:38pm

I rode from Otley to Chamonix, in France I navigated with the red Michelin sheet which shows the whole of the country. I drew a line from Boulogne to Geneva and followed this, managing to mostly keep to routes departementale.

Jamesh
Posts: 505
Joined: 2 Jan 2017, 5:56pm

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Jamesh » 25 May 2019, 12:27am

Much prefer maps to phone navigation.
Sense of achievement too when you turn a fold / page or pass through a village / town!
Only if I'm really stuck will I use Google maps.

Cheers James

Oldjohnw
Posts: 1500
Joined: 16 Oct 2018, 4:23am
Location: Northumberland

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Oldjohnw » 25 May 2019, 1:12am

I have the entry level Garman E10 which I use when walking in the hills if I need exact location. Otherwise, good old OS maps.
John

Cycling and recycling

PaulaT
Posts: 25
Joined: 20 Dec 2018, 6:41pm
Location: Staffordshire

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby PaulaT » 25 May 2019, 1:11pm

I've done plenty of tours in the "old days" (pre-Google and pre-Smartphone) using just basic maps. The only electronics I take out cycling are my basic 7-function cycle computer (battery lasts a year or more) and the bike's lights. I'll use computers for route planning ahead of time but when out riding I'll be using paper maps.

Bmblbzzz
Posts: 2731
Joined: 18 May 2012, 7:56pm
Location: From here to there.

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby Bmblbzzz » 25 May 2019, 3:11pm

I would have sent the OP's old gent up to the Severn Bridge via Tockington and Olveston, but it does depend where you're starting from. Doesn't it always?

As for GPS v maps, both! I love paper maps, as others have said they give a sense of a whole area and show many possibilities. But GPS is convenient because it is in effect a map of a huge area stored without the bulk of the equivalent number of printed maps. Plan route looking at paper map, plot on favourite mapping app, eg RWGPS or cycle.travel, upload route to GPS device and follow the line. No need to follow it slavishly, detour and you can easily return by zooming out. Or abandon completely. Occasionally I'll also print out a route from cycle.travel as a pdf; quite attractive though not as much as an OS map, agreed. I never use turn-by-turn or allow the Garmin to plot its own route. And sometimes I just follow my nose, diverting down whatever lane or track looks interesting.

irc
Posts: 4534
Joined: 3 Dec 2008, 2:22pm
Location: glasgow

Re: Old Skool Cycle Tourist

Postby irc » 25 May 2019, 10:08pm

Morzedec wrote:B :D onjour, another 'Old Gent' here (a mere 73).

I now live 95% of the time in France, where I have no car, landline nor mobile, television, washing machine, central heating, nor much else either. What I do have is an acre of fruit trees and veg beds (produce which I swap for wood), plus three bikes and two trailers. My Pavone dates from '74, My Raleigh from '78, and my Holdsworth from '80: by the end of last year one trailer had 50,000km under its single wheel, but if I go out 'wooding' has not enough capacity so I've a new one which rides 'in-line' tandem' behind the first one.

Am I happy? dead right I am, but not as happy as I'll be on Tuesday when I set off back to France again: five and a half days to ride from Roscoff until I reach home (600km), wild camping along the way.

I have a near-neighbour in France (anyone living less than 5km away is a neighbour) who is 88 years young, and he rides out - weather permitting - every day.

Ah, the open road, and at this time of the year - the smell of manure in the fields.

Happy days,


Leo??
Glad to see you're still on the road. Recognised you very Happy Days sign off.
Regards
Iain c