Maintenance and toolkit when touring

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
Cyclewala
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Joined: 7 Nov 2019, 11:07am

Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby Cyclewala » 14 Dec 2020, 12:46pm

mjr wrote:I find it interesting that you're carrying spare spokes and seatpost clamp before a spare tyre. I think most tourers would put those in the other order. Are you carrying a tyre boot or something which could be used to hold a slashed tyre together long enough to reach a spare?

I think it depends where you're touring. In Europe, I decide that a tyre boot or wrangling the bike into a single speed to limp on to a suitable bike shop means I don't carry spare tyres or derailleur hanger. I'm also fairly cavalier about things like brake pads and cables, as I check/change them a few weeks before departure and I've got two sets of each anyway... I also like lots of slack in my plan to cope with such things, or to visit things and eat well, so 50 miles is the preferred maximum planned daily distance.

The one I um and ah about is whether to get one of those fibre spoke temporary repair things. I think my spokes are different lengths (some wheels are same both sides, but front/back and bike-to-bike) and it might help another rider in my tour group. But so far, I haven't yet bought one and I've limped home with a half-straightened wheel and the back brake QR open the only time I broke a spoke.


Sorry for giving the wrong impression. I carry a spare folding tyre. The reason for spokes and seatpost clamp is being a heavier rider, I've suffered with the former abroad and with the latter at home commuting. It was not nice riding the remaining 9 miles of a 12 mile commute standing up.

Cyclewala
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Joined: 7 Nov 2019, 11:07am

Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby Cyclewala » 14 Dec 2020, 12:48pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:Why a spare seatpost clamp? It's surely one of the least used parts of the bike: once set, it's just there. Unless you're frequently taking the bike on buses/planes/etc?


Broken twice, commuting. Heavy rider - 18st plus rugby player build on a good day and a fat blob on a bad one.

Jdsk
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby Jdsk » 14 Dec 2020, 12:50pm

From your starting list in the first post, I'd:

Add:
Tent repairs, but many of the bits are multipurpose for eg panniers, clothes, shoes
Tube repair stuff, tubes and at least one tyre
Cable ties, tape
Nuts, bolts, washers, having standardised as many as possible
Wire if you have dynamos and don't have spare in the system somewhere already.

Remove:
Derailer hanger
Seatpost clamp.

A list for comparison:
http://adventure-cycling-guide.co.uk/spares.htm

Jonathan

tatanab
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby tatanab » 14 Dec 2020, 1:21pm

Derailer hanger
Seatpost clamp
I've never had a frame where either is replaceable (50+ years of touring), so that is 2 fewer parts for me to lug around. Things I have broken on tour are saddle rails (once) and hub flange (once) - not things you would consider carrying as spares.

axel_knutt
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby axel_knutt » 14 Dec 2020, 3:41pm

These are the spares I carry:

Tube
Patches
Tyre boot
Tyre patch
Nuts & bolts
Ty-Raps
2-3” of chain
Spare links

And these are the failures I've had whilst away on tour:

Rim. I noticed some loss of lateral rigidity, but didn't spot the fatigue fractures on all the spoke holes until I serviced it back at home ~500 miles later.
Broken toe strap. Rode it, and bought new ones at the next shop.
Broken rack. I noticed a loud crack when it broke but I was looking for broken spokes, so I didn't find the cause until I was servicing it after I got back home. I used it repaired with Ty-Raps for several more weeks whilst I was choosing a replacement.
Minced pedal bearing. Rode it, and bought new pedals when I got home ~800 miles later.
Frayed gear cable. Bought a new one at the next shop, but didn't need to fit it until I'd returned home ~700 miles later.
Gear lever. The top 3 gears were inaccessible, so I used the bottom 5 until I got home ~500miles later.
Several tyres. Bought new ones at the next shop.
Pannier (& clothing) falling apart at the seams. Sewed it back up again.
Freehub. Dubious sounding noise from it. Took it into an LBS, but they didn't have correct model in stock, so I rode it until I got home ~500 miles later. It never failed, but I replaced it anyway.

Spokes. My last bike was a habitual spoke breaker from new, it went back under guarantee nearly every week. That was a PITA, so once the guarantee ran out I used to ignore them until there were enough to make it worth repairing. I came back from a tour with 7 broken spokes on the rear wheel once. No other bike has ever broken a single spoke, so I regard the risk of getting one as minimal, and the risk of it being a problem if I do as even smaller.

I've had a few other failures local to home, but the only one that left me stranded was a broken crank.
“I'm not upset that you lied to me, I'm upset that from now on I can't believe you.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

ANTONISH
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby ANTONISH » 14 Dec 2020, 4:37pm

mjr wrote:
The one I um and ah about is whether to get one of those fibre spoke temporary repair things. I think my spokes are different lengths (some wheels are same both sides, but front/back and bike-to-bike) and it might help another rider in my tour group. But so far, I haven't yet bought one and I've limped home with a half-straightened wheel and the back brake QR open the only time I broke a spoke.


I've got one of those - a friend gave me one when I broke a spoke a few years ago. It does the job and it makes replacing a drive side spoke a lot less hassle. You need to read the instructions.
I usually carry one for touring and audax rides.

Jdsk
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby Jdsk » 14 Dec 2020, 4:39pm

In case anyone's wondering:

Fiber Fix Emergency Replacement Spoke
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/spokes/fiber-fix-emergency-replacement-spoke/

Image

Jonathan

pwa
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby pwa » 14 Dec 2020, 5:15pm

Jdsk wrote:In case anyone's wondering:

Fiber Fix Emergency Replacement Spoke
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/spokes/fiber-fix-emergency-replacement-spoke/

Image

Jonathan

I've carried one for years but never needed it. It weighs almost nothing, but I wonder how effective it would be at temporarily replacing a spoke. Could I get enough tension with it. Maybe I should find a spare wheel in the back of the garage and try it. Take a spoke out and see if I can get the wheel back to something like true with the string jobbie.

But taking a few real spokes and bits to enable them to be fitted (NBT2 and spoke key) must be much better.

Stradageek
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby Stradageek » 14 Dec 2020, 6:00pm

Go to Tom Allen's website

https://tomsbiketrip.com/the-ultimate-f ... -contents/

The rest of the site might also prove useful

simonhill
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Location: Essex

Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby simonhill » 14 Dec 2020, 6:00pm

You can take everything and you can take nothing. The space in-between is very large.

I've been touring for a while, mostly in far away places and tend to favour the taking (next to) nothing approach. I realise this is an anathema to many forum members, but it is based on my experiences and what is available locally.

Firstly, I had my bike built with reliability and replaceability in mind. 26" wheels, rim brakes, steel frame, etc. Almost all parts I could need are available locally where I go. This would be the first thing for the OP to consider.

Secondly, I always make sure my bike is in good condition before I set off. New chain, tyres replaced at ½ wear, brakes, cables, etc and then run it all in for a weeks or so.

Next, what have you had fail? I struggle to think of almost anything after many months over years on the road. I don't carry a spare tyre and only once replaced one - it had a flat spot, but was still usable. I was in the mountains and one was available so I bought it. I've had a few punctures so tubes and repair kit carried. I split a rim once, but that was carelessness on my part in setting out with a worn rim. Got it replaced in next sizeable town (Thailand) with exact same model (Sun CR18). Fortunately I have a NBT2 tool which was needed by the mechanic. (The NBT2 was recommended many years ago and it was small and cheap so I got one. It had laid unused in the bottom of my pannier for many years.)

I also take a chain quick-link and one set of brake blocks, but these are small and they sit at the bottom of my pannier from trip to trip. 6 spokes to cover the 3 types.

I used to carry spare cables, etc but they we're never used, rusted from regular wetting in tool pouch and eventually I ditched them. Definitely take a few zip ties, but these are readily available if needed.

A set of 4 pannier hooks which would not be available locally, in case of breakage (never) or losing them (never) after removing for flying.

Again, surprise, surprise, my tool kit is fairly minimal.

A final thing is that I ride carefully - what I call 'light'. I don't go crashing around on my bike; I drop off kerbs carefully; I don't push (force) high gears; stroke rather than jab the gear shifters; ease rather than yank the brakes; etc. I think most modern bike gear is well made and with just a little bit of care will (can) last a long time.

PH
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby PH » 14 Dec 2020, 10:32pm

mjr wrote:I don't carry spare tyres or derailleur hanger.

Have you seen just how many types there are? Considering it's designed to be sacrificial and the odds against finding a replacement at most bikes shops, it's on my list way above those things I know are more likely to be available.
The one I um and ah about is whether to get one of those fibre spoke temporary repair things.

I like the idea, but CJ gave it such a poor rating when he reviewed it a few years ago I haven't bothered.

PH
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby PH » 14 Dec 2020, 10:48pm

pwa wrote:
Jdsk wrote:In case anyone's wondering:

Fiber Fix Emergency Replacement Spoke
Jonathan

I've carried one for years but never needed it. It weighs almost nothing, but I wonder how effective it would be at temporarily replacing a spoke.

Review here
https://www.cyclinguk.org/sites/default ... -rides.pdf

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andrew_s
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby andrew_s » 14 Dec 2020, 11:24pm

PH wrote:
The one I um and ah about is whether to get one of those fibre spoke temporary repair things.

I like the idea, but CJ gave it such a poor rating when he reviewed it a few years ago I haven't bothered.
Review here
https://www.cyclinguk.org/sites/default ... -rides.pdf

I note that CJ's review of the fibre spoke reads like he used the regular spoke nipple, but it now seems that an extra long nipple is now supplied.
It seems that they may have read the review and taken action.

Since there's a double line to the hub, you can also poke a stick, or the broken spoke, in, and add further tension by twisting the cord, spanish windlass style.

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mjr
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Re: Carrying spares - how far do you go?

Postby mjr » 15 Dec 2020, 12:29am

PH wrote:
mjr wrote:I don't carry spare tyres or derailleur hanger.

Have you seen just how many types there are? Considering it's designed to be sacrificial and the odds against finding a replacement at most bikes shops, it's on my list way above those things I know are more likely to be available.

That may be a sensible choice but my usual touring bike doesn't even have a derailleur, and I'm pretty sure the only derailleur bike I might tour on predates hangers.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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Brucey
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Re: Maintenance and toolkit when touring

Postby Brucey » 15 Dec 2020, 1:14am

online review of fiberfix spoke;

Great for tying things up
By *******
Aug 2019
5 / 5 I recommend this product

e.g. my wife when she whinged about me buying bike bits.
Probably works as an emergency spoke too


The best thing is to have reliable wheels that don't break spokes in the first place.
IME if you carry spare spokes and a means of removing the cassette, this pretty much guarantees that you won't need them.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~