Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

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vegan dog
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby vegan dog » 30 Nov 2019, 4:12pm

mikeymo wrote: I even deliberately loaded the bike with an extra 17kgs of stuff, as a test, and it was fine on a 20 mile ride.


Wow that is very heavy. I am preparing for a world tour and earlier in the summer I did a trial run for a week. My bike is a heavy frame bike, so there is nothing I can do about that, but for luggage everything came to just 3kg. I don't use a tent, and I take the bare minimum e.g. tarp, sleeping bag and a few clothes. Not too worried about smelly clothes on the road, as I would rather have less weight. As a compromise why not camp, but buy your food in restaurants / cafe? That's what I do, I just can't be bothered taking lots of food and cooking stuff. Another option is you can just eat cold food from the supermarket? I'm vegan, so if there is no restaurant / cafe open, I just go to the supermarket and buy nuts, seeds, bread, salad, fruit etc.

Personally I would hate to book somewhere every night, and be committed to that place. Plans change and it's good to be flexible.

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horizon
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby horizon » 30 Nov 2019, 6:51pm

Navrig wrote:When was the last time you camped?

I would have a trial run of sleeping in a tent on ground similar to that likely to be experienced in the Hebrides.

I stopped camping many years ago when I could barely walk after a couple of nights sleeping in a tent. I'm fitter and stronger now through exercise but still don't want to face the potential pain and discomfort experienced previously so wont even try it in the back garden.


One thing about cycle camping is that it more or less forces you to improve your flexibility and increase your resilience. I know it's meant to be a holiday but coming back fitter and healthier is maybe its own reward. Obviously if you suffer from a medical condition, that's different. But for the rest of us, the ability to crawl into a small tent, cope with the space restriction and sleep on a thin mattress in most weathers is something to be valued at any age. I do worry that as a population we are losing the resilience that keeps us happy and healthy. And I speak as someone who likes his warmth and comfort: modern equipment is pretty amazing. But then so too is the human body if given the chance.
The experience of travel is something that you have to pay for but can never buy. Ho Ri Zon Chinese philosopher

Oldjohnw
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby Oldjohnw » 30 Nov 2019, 7:43pm

horizon wrote:
Navrig wrote:When was the last time you camped?

I would have a trial run of sleeping in a tent on ground similar to that likely to be experienced in the Hebrides.

I stopped camping many years ago when I could barely walk after a couple of nights sleeping in a tent. I'm fitter and stronger now through exercise but still don't want to face the potential pain and discomfort experienced previously so wont even try it in the back garden.


One thing about cycle camping is that it more or less forces you to improve your flexibility and increase your resilience. I know it's meant to be a holiday but coming back fitter and healthier is maybe its own reward. Obviously if you suffer from a medical condition, that's different. But for the rest of us, the ability to crawl into a small tent, cope with the space restriction and sleep on a thin mattress in most weathers is something to be valued at any age. I do worry that as a population we are losing the resilience that keeps us happy and healthy. And I speak as someone who likes his warmth and comfort: modern equipment is pretty amazing. But then so too is the human body if given the chance.


Of course, each to their own. But glamping is, to me, hideous.
John

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mjr
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby mjr » 30 Nov 2019, 7:50pm

vegan dog wrote:Personally I would hate to book somewhere every night, and be committed to that place. Plans change and it's good to be flexible.

Being booked in B&Bs doesn't mean you have to be inflexible. It just means you know you've beds all the way home unless something goes awry. If it really does, you can cancel a few and book others (maybe not in the outer Hebrides, but in most of Europe, especially with a bike so you can choose city centre or remote as available), but it's surprising how much can go awry and you still reach your intended stop. Closed train routes and burning cars didn't stop us this year! :lol: You can also look forward to where you're going if you know where it is!
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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vegan dog
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby vegan dog » 1 Dec 2019, 9:28am

mjr wrote:Being booked in B&Bs doesn't mean you have to be inflexible. It just means you know you've beds all the way home unless something goes awry.


Everyone to their own, but I would hate the hassle of booking all these places (especially on a world tour!) and having to make choices about predefined stops. It's okay once in a while, but as a regular thing - no thanks. Some days you feel more tired than others. For myself some days I do a hundred miles plus, other days I barely make 20! Sometimes I am distracted by something very interesting on route and spend the rest of the day doing unplanned sight seeing, or change my plans in other ways. Sometimes I get lost accidentally, go off route and end up finding the most beautiful place in the world. Other days I seem to waste most of the day talking to interesting people I meet along the way. But maybe my idea of touring is not typical? For me it's more about the journey, the nature,, the history and the people you meet on the way than the cycling.

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mjr
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby mjr » 1 Dec 2019, 10:14am

vegan dog wrote:Everyone to their own, but I would hate the hassle of booking all these places (especially on a world tour!) and having to make choices about predefined stops. It's okay once in a while, but as a regular thing - no thanks.

Instead, you have the hassle of finding accommodation every day, which I wouldn't want, being uncertain if I'd got a place to rest and moreover somewhere safe to park - and that's fine, neither of us is being forced to do it the other way. That doesn't mean we should lie about the reasons.

Most of my tours have been with friends - 10 last year - so just turning up is unlikely to end well.
Some days you feel more tired than others. For myself some days I do a hundred miles plus, other days I barely make 20! Sometimes I am distracted by something very interesting on route and spend the rest of the day doing unplanned sight seeing, or change my plans in other ways. Sometimes I get lost accidentally, go off route and end up finding the most beautiful place in the world. Other days I seem to waste most of the day talking to interesting people I meet along the way.

All of those are possible prebooked. If you want to ride more, you can usually add in meanders and detours to see more stuff. Riding less than the shortest route can be difficult but you can almost always alter bookings.

But maybe my idea of touring is not typical? For me it's more about the journey, the nature,, the history and the people you meet on the way than the cycling.

For me too. It's definitely not about sleeping on dirt!
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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pga
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby pga » 4 Dec 2019, 12:14am

In the 1950's when we were young and poor we curled in our oilskin cycle capes and slept in a field,or if we were lucky in a barn, as best we could. We always got an early start - just to keep warm.

Then as we got a pay packet we used the extensive range of youth hostels in the UK and Europe, plus cheap hotels in the latter.

Later I cycle camped alone, with family and friends. Flexible and cheap. Over the years I learnt to keep the weight down - the lightest of everything - my usual tent is 1 kg. Silk lining in the light sleeping bag and inflatable mat. Cut down on clothing - only shorts need daily washing. Likewise cooking stove should be small and with easy to get fuel. Only carry porridge and tea and buy food to cook for the evening meal just before you stop for the day. Light stainless steel cooking set.

Low gears are a must and bike with secure front and rear carriers and panniers - the latter waterproof. Nevertheless a loaded cycle camping bike still weighs a ton. It gets some getting use to.

In old age we have given up camping and use the cheap budget hotels, both in the UK and Europe, which are all very cycle friendly. Only two panniers needed.

Good luck with cycle camping. It should be part of every touring cyclists experience.

willem jongman
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Re: Camping touring vs B&B touring - how much extra weight?

Postby willem jongman » 4 Dec 2019, 10:38am

I love camping because I like to be outdoors, because it is relatively flexible (but that depends on the country you are cycling in), and because it is cheaper. The downside is that in at least some countries campsites are now so crowded with camper vans etc that I do not feel quite at home anymore. As for extra weight, my guess is that in summer I keep it under 5kg: tent and footprint 2 kg, Neoair mattress and down sleeping bag 1.5 kg, Trangia stove/pots and fuel 1 kg, various little things another 500 grams. I normally only use two smallish rear panniers, with the potentially wet tent on top. Plus a bar bag for easy access and valuables. In the cold season my luggage will be a bit more, and I will need my Orlieb backrollers rather than the lighter and smaller Altura ARC 15 panniers. Total warm weather weight 12-15 kg, total cold weather weight 15-18 kg. When I tour with my wife the weight per person is about the same or even a bit more. It should be less but my wife doe snot quite share my preference for minimalism, although she has adopted quite a few of my suggestions. So we have a very happy compromise.