Eurovelo 5 information

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
BMG100
Posts: 17
Joined: 3 Apr 2009, 1:53pm

Eurovelo 5 information

Postby BMG100 » 15 Apr 2009, 9:51pm

Hi,

Does anyone have or now where to find any information on this route. I am finding it really hard to find detailed information about it. It seems that it does in fact exist but details are very sketchy!! Do the paths come under different regional names perhaps??

Any information would much appreciated.

Cheers
Brent

User avatar
megilleland
Posts: 293
Joined: 11 Aug 2007, 7:49pm
Location: Hereford

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby megilleland » 15 Apr 2009, 10:29pm

Have you had a look at this blog. This chap (Andrew) has plenty of information about his planned 2010 cycle tour based on Eurovelo 5. You also need to google "Via Francigena" - the pilgrim route from Rome to Canterbury for information.

A set of guides on this pilgrim route is available You can contact the English publisher through their website which is a bit of a mess - maybe its my browser!

User avatar
apsykes
Posts: 61
Joined: 18 Jul 2009, 11:40am
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby apsykes » 18 Jul 2009, 11:48am

Hi Brent, I am that person with the blog! Get in touch or have a look at the blog - http://puglia2010.wordpress.com/ itself (which you may already have done). If you are planning to cycle the route this summer, let me know how you get on - my trip is sceduled for summer 2010.
Cheers
Andrew
apsykes@hotmail.com
Last edited by apsykes on 4 Apr 2010, 10:10am, edited 2 times in total.
Andrew P. Sykes
0(044)7970278569
apsykes@hotmail.com
http://CyclingEurope.org
Author of 'Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie'
"A wonderful, witty account of a cycle tour across Europe" (CTC)

Dbangsund
Posts: 2
Joined: 1 Dec 2009, 5:31am

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby Dbangsund » 1 Dec 2009, 5:51am

Andrew

Three of us are planning on going from Rome to Amsterdam in late May and early June, 2010. We are thinking about using EuroVelo 5 from Rome to somewhere in Belguim. Have you ever been able to find a detailed route map of Route 5? Thanks.

David
Portland Oregon

User avatar
apsykes
Posts: 61
Joined: 18 Jul 2009, 11:40am
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby apsykes » 2 Dec 2009, 4:33am

The most detailed route that I have so far found was via a guy in Belgium who supplied me with maps from Brussels to the Swiss-Italian border. I have posted them to the blog: http://puglia2010.wordpress.com/the-route/
Keep in touch about your plans!
Best wishes
Andrew
Last edited by apsykes on 4 Apr 2010, 10:09am, edited 1 time in total.
Andrew P. Sykes
0(044)7970278569
apsykes@hotmail.com
http://CyclingEurope.org
Author of 'Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie'
"A wonderful, witty account of a cycle tour across Europe" (CTC)

User avatar
apsykes
Posts: 61
Joined: 18 Jul 2009, 11:40am
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby apsykes » 31 Jan 2010, 10:12am

Just changed my website: the new one is http://www.puglia2010.wordpress.com . New look and lots of new info....
Andrew P. Sykes
0(044)7970278569
apsykes@hotmail.com
http://CyclingEurope.org
Author of 'Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie'
"A wonderful, witty account of a cycle tour across Europe" (CTC)

User avatar
apsykes
Posts: 61
Joined: 18 Jul 2009, 11:40am
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby apsykes » 4 Apr 2010, 10:08am

Thought I'd pay a visit to this thread again as my plans to cycle along the Eurovelo 5 route are now just under 3 months away - I set off on the 18th July. I still haven't found (and I now believe it doesn't exist) a detailed route map of the EV5 and over the next couple of weeks will be sitting down to put the meat on the bones of the tentative route that I have put together and posted on my website - http://puglia2010.wordpress.com/the-route/ (you'll need to scroll down a bit). If anyone has any advice or guidance based upon the route that I have so far come up with, I'd love to hear it. The EV5 piggy-backs upon national and regional routes where available so I'd be ineterested in any links to these routes that anyone knows about. I'll be crossing the Alps via the St Gotthard Pass.
Looking forward to hearing your ideas!
Cheers
Andrew
Andrew P. Sykes
0(044)7970278569
apsykes@hotmail.com
http://CyclingEurope.org
Author of 'Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie'
"A wonderful, witty account of a cycle tour across Europe" (CTC)

User avatar
megilleland
Posts: 293
Joined: 11 Aug 2007, 7:49pm
Location: Hereford

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby megilleland » 4 Apr 2010, 12:10pm

Not sure what parts of Eurovelo 5 your missing. Regarding the Via Francigena have you seen this guide and map?

Also this site has the route on google earth and stages of the route in the form of a road book.

User avatar
apsykes
Posts: 61
Joined: 18 Jul 2009, 11:40am
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby apsykes » 4 Apr 2010, 6:34pm

Thanks for this. The "problem" with the Eurovelo 5 is that it doesn't really follow the Via Francigena until you get into northern Italy. The VF crosses the Alps at the Great St. Bernard Pass, the EV5 further to the east at the St Gotthard Pass. And of course the VF is primarily a walking route although some people do actually ride it. This would mean a more direct route that just passes through France and Switzerland before arriving in Italy whereas the EV5 is, again, slightly more to the east and passes though Belgium, Luxembourg and then heads for the Rhine and passes through Strasbourg and Colmar before passing through Switzerland. It remains, as far as I know, unmapped.... Perhaps I should do just that :D
In Italy, there are national cycle routes that mirror the Via Francigena - the Via dei Pelligrini (literally the "pilgrim route") which is route number 3 and goes all the way from the Alps to Brindisi although it is interesting to note that even number 3 approaches the Alps to the east of the official VF route.... It's all a very tangled web!
If you are interested, here are my blog posts that relate to the VF: http://puglia2010.wordpress.com/tag/via-francigena/
Andrew P. Sykes
0(044)7970278569
apsykes@hotmail.com
http://CyclingEurope.org
Author of 'Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie'
"A wonderful, witty account of a cycle tour across Europe" (CTC)

User avatar
megilleland
Posts: 293
Joined: 11 Aug 2007, 7:49pm
Location: Hereford

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby megilleland » 5 Apr 2010, 12:41am

This EuroVelo 5 route is a bit of a mystery. As you explained there is no defined single route mapped out to follow. This extract taken from The European Cyclists Federation's EuroVelo Cycle Route Map flyer gives the general route through the various countries. Extract below:

"EuroVelo 5: Via Romea Francigena
London – Rome and Brindisi 3,900 km"

"This is another pilgrim route, also called Via Romea Francigena leading from
Canterbury to Rome, used in the past by thousands of pilgrims heading for Rome
and probably back again. Pilgrims going to Rome carried the symbolic key of Saint
Peter, like the pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela had the shell as symbol.

The route to Rome is 2,100 km and now the route has been prolonged to Brindisi
with a ferry connection to Greece, because the pilgrims also came to Rome this
way. EV5 passes 6 countries: England (180 km), Northern France (140 km), Belgium (260
km), Luxembourg (75 km), East France (400 km), Switzerland (360 km) and finally Italy
(2500 km). In this way important cities of Europe, like London, Brussels, Strasbourg,
Basel, Milano and Rome have been connected.

Starting in London provides you with an opportunity to experience famous landmarks such
as the Tower of London, Tower Bridge, the Millennium Dome and the fascinating pubs,
galleries and museums, before the trip continues through southern England with its
blossoming apple orchards – if you go in the spring. Of course, Canterbury with its cathedral
is a compulsory stop. Here Anselm came up with the tricky ontological argument
for the existence of God. It will keep you busy until Rome. In Dover the white cliffs wait for
you.

Channel crossing by train or ferry to France at Calais. Then you follow Canal de
Calais to Saint Omer signed as LF 1 and continue through Lille/Roubaix into Belgium.
Here you follow the river/canal Escaut, which is the border between Flanders
and Wallonia and then through Ronse and into Brussels. Leaving again, the route
bends down through the hilly landscape of Wallonia passing Namur with fortress
and an old centre.

Then head towards Luxembourg. In this small country, several cycle routes have
been signed, and you can use PC18, PC17, PC12 and PC13 from Martelange leading
through the pleasant countryside to the North into the capital with its old centre.
Then south to Schengen on the Mosell, where 3 countries meet (F, L, D) use PC
1 to Hesperange, roads to Ellange-Gare and finally PC7 to Remich and PC3 to
Schengen. More info http://www.lvi.lu and the guidebook, VeloTour Luxembourg.

Next stage leads via Moselle cycle path back to France, this time the eastern
part with very nice, landscape, towns and wine (Alsace). Strasbourg has many nice
cyclist facilities and Colmar invites you in with beautiful old houses and nice cafés.

Basel is an international city between 3 countries and also the entrance to the
well signed national cycle routes of Switzerland. The landscape is amazing and
sometimes a bit hard to cycle, but the service, with cyclist friendly hotels (Velotels),
and trains with easy access for bikes etc. makes it a dream come true to cycle in
this country. We pass Aarau with a nice lake, and Lucerne with the famous Kapellbrücke
(bridge) from 1300.

Italy is reached through the Sankt Gotthard Pass. Continue to Chiasso and
Como in Lombardy. Northern Italy have several initiatives to build cyclists facilities.
Last stage to Rome you follow the national cycle route of “Ciclopista del Sole”. It is
not signed yet, but maps and guidebooks are available."


Having read that there is a link to the Luxembourg routes here. Detail on each route is listed here.

Looking at the Swiss section the route you are looking for is called the North-South Route from Basel to Chiasso. This route is contained in the website Veloland which contains 9 national routes, 52 regional routes and 30 local routes. The North-South route 3 is found here. This route can be followed in great detail by zooming in on the map shown here: along with other useful information. Uncheck the regional and local routes in the side menu.

psmiffy
Posts: 610
Joined: 1 May 2009, 1:32pm

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby psmiffy » 5 Apr 2010, 12:11pm

I am getting confused with my Eurovelos and the official website is not very clear - what is Brenner to Trento (overall Northkapp to Malta?) along the via Claudia Augustine - I thought that was Velo 6

User avatar
megilleland
Posts: 293
Joined: 11 Aug 2007, 7:49pm
Location: Hereford

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby megilleland » 5 Apr 2010, 1:46pm

I know what you mean. You are thinking about EuroVelo 7.
This extract taken from The European Cyclists Federation's EuroVelo Cycle Route Map flyer gives the general route through the various countries. Extract below:

EuroVelo 7: The Sun Route
North Cape – Malta 7,409 km
The route connects the midnight sun of Scandinavia with the sunny Mediterranean
Sea. So when you cycle southwards, the ice will gradually melt on your nose
and the sun will warm up your cyclist muscles and finally burn your skin brown!

You can travel to the North Cape in Norway by bike, by the ferry “Hurtigruten”
from Bergen (5 days) or by plane to Alta via Oslo/Copenhagen. North Cape is the
northernmost point in Europe and situated on the island Magerøya, now connected
by tunnels. You could stay at the youth hostel in Honningsvåg, leave your luggage
and cycle 33 km to NC and back again. Alta is about 200 km South and from the
North Cape to the border of Finland there is 362 km.

After Hedda, use the signed N 21 and 101 km later, the border to Sweden. From
here follow cycle route Sverigeleden to Haparanda (414 km) at the Baltic Sea and
go South using cycle route Cykelspåret. In Sundsvall, we leave the sea and head for
the countryside through villages with red and yellow wooden houses and green
fields surrounded by stone fences. Follow the green signs to Falköping, then a disused
railway, local routes and finally Cykelspåret along the coast to Helsingborg.

Denmark is reached by a short ferry trip. From Helsingør, with the famous castle
of Kronborg known from Shakespeare´s Hamlet, you cycle South to Copenhagen
using N9. The journey down through Zealand, Møn and Falster is nice with winding
roads, arable land, country estates and castles. The route follows the eastern coast
of Zealand, Møn and Bogø, before continuing along the beautiful East coast of Falster,
with picturesque beech trees on the shore. Finally after 300 km in Denmark you
arrive at the southernmost point, Gedser.

We arrive in Germany by ferry (2 hours) and soon pass Rostock, with beautiful
house gables. Güstrow is a smaller, nice town with a gothic dome and castle. Next
stage goes through forests and along lakes unto the idyllic Krakow am See and
Waren, with the biggest lake in Germany. The capital Berlin is worthy of a journey
by itself and enhanced with safe cycle tracks. Do follow the signed cycle route R1
to Potsdam with its park and the castle Sanssouci and continue south to Luthertown
Wittenberg at the Elbe. The river can be followed to Dresden, the “Florence on
the Elbe”. It is easy to find accommodation in Germany and some are special for
cyclists: “Bett&Bike”. In Germany: 744 km.

Czech Republic welcomes you with green valleys, sculptural mountains, nice
towns and good beer. The river is the same, but the name change to Labe and you
have the pleasure of resting in towns like Decin, Melnik and the incredible town of
Praha. Next stage is through the origin of beers with Ceske Budejovice and many
castles. This makes 366 km in CZ.

Austria is reached at the famous river Donau with the most popular cycle route
in Europe and the town of Linz. Follow the Donau upstream direction Passau, but
don´t worry - it is flat and easy to cycle and free from cars. Enjoy all the cyclists
you meet and the facilities – this is also EV 6. Then we head towards Salzburg, the
town of Mozart, following the river Inn and the Tauernradweg. This part is still relatively
flat, but later in order to reach the border to Italy, we have to climb.
In Austria: 575 km.

Northern part of Italy welcomes you with signed routes, while in the south part
only few cycle routes exist. However, it is possible to follow minor roads and you can
also bring your bike on trains in order to escape difficult stretches. Follow the so
called Ciclopista del Sole. You can buy cyclist maps for this route. Italy is a very
long country with many interesting towns and landscapes – 2,429 km to go.

From Siracusa of Sicily take the ferry to Malta and enjoy the beautiful harbour.
Cycle routes have been planned, but until they are in place, do cycle with care. The
smaller island of Gozo can be reached by a short ferry trip and here you can cycle
more safely. Also the western part of Malta has many small and quiet roads.
Remember left driving. Malta has many cultural sights and only small distances
and in the future it will become an excellent place for holiday cyclists.

User avatar
megilleland
Posts: 293
Joined: 11 Aug 2007, 7:49pm
Location: Hereford

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby megilleland » 5 Apr 2010, 1:51pm

Also useful extract about ECF and national countries websites. You may find more information regarding national, regional and local routes on these websites if you can speak their language - although some are in English!

Founded in 1983, the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) is the umbrella federation
of 51 cyclists’ associations in some 36 countries. The ECF is pledged to
ensure that bicycle use achieves its fullest potential so as to bring about sustainable
mobility and public well-being. To achieve these aims, the ECF seeks to change
attitudes, policies and budget allocations at the European level. The ECF stimulates
and organises the exchange of information and expertise on bicycle related
transport policies and strategies as well as the work of the cyclists’ movement. One
major instrument for doing so is the biennial Velo-city conference, organized in
partnership with European cities.

One of the main projects of the ECF is EuroVelo, the European cycle route network.
This network consists of 12 routes, totalling over 66,000 km, of which about
45,000 km is already in place. The EuroVelo routes are made up of existing and
planned regional and national cycle routes, partially signposted with EuroVelo
signs. The development and operation of the EuroVelo routes are carried out by national,
regional and local governments, commercial service providers and NGOs.
EuroVelo is a registered trade mark of the ECF, and only routes approved by the ECF
have the right to call themselves EuroVelo; this is an important badge of quality for
both the cyclist and the route promoter.

Country Website
A http://www.argus.or.at; http://www.ig-fahrrad.org
B http://www.provelo.be; http://www.fietsersbond.be; http://www.gracq.org
CH http://www.pro-velo.ch; http://www.cycling-in-switzerland.ch
CY http://www.visitcyprus.com;
CZ http://www.cyclistswelcome.eu; http://www.radfahrerwillkomen.eu
D http://www.adfc.de
DK http://www.visitdenmark.com/cycling; http://www.trafikken.dk
E http://www.viasverdes.com
EE http://www.bicycle.ee; http://www.citybike.ee
FIN http://www.hepo.fi
F http://www.af3v.org
GR http://www.filoi.eie.gr
H http://www.kerekparosklub.org
HR http://www.bicikl.hr
I http://www.bicitalia.org; http://www.albergabici.it;
http://cyronmed.basilicatanet.it/page.asp
IRL http://homepage.eircom.net/%7Ectc/
IS http://www.hjol.org; http://www.fjallahjolaklubburinn.is
L http://www.lvi.lu; http://www.velospisten.lu
LT http://www.bicycle.lt
LV http://vic.velokurjers.lv/bicycle
M http://www.letsgocycling.org
NL http://www.fietskaartinformatiestichting.nl; http://www.fietsplatform.nl
N http://www.syklistene.no; http://www.bike-norway.com
PL http://www.eurovelo.pl
P http://fpcub.pt/portal/
R http://www.ccn.ro
RU http://www.rctc.ru
S http://www.cykelframjandet.se; http://www.svenska-cykelsallskapet.se
SK http://www.cykloklub.sk; http://www.slovakia.travel
SL http://www.kolesarji.org
E http://www.ccub.org; http://www.conbici.org
SRB http://www.bicikl.info
UK http://www.ctc.org.uk; http://www.sustrans.org.uk

psmiffy
Posts: 610
Joined: 1 May 2009, 1:32pm

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby psmiffy » 5 Apr 2010, 1:59pm

Thanks it would appear that I have ridden a 1000ks more of the 7 than I had thought - I am not sure that I would of described Dresden as being the Florence of the Elbe

User avatar
apsykes
Posts: 61
Joined: 18 Jul 2009, 11:40am
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Eurovelo 5 information

Postby apsykes » 12 Apr 2010, 12:08am

To make life easier, my website is now at http://www.eurovelo5.com .... it does what it says on the tin!
:)
Andrew
Andrew P. Sykes
0(044)7970278569
apsykes@hotmail.com
http://CyclingEurope.org
Author of 'Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie'
"A wonderful, witty account of a cycle tour across Europe" (CTC)