LEJOG - What type of bike?

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
simontheref

LEJOG - What type of bike?

Postby simontheref » 25 Jan 2007, 6:33pm

Hi,

Am doing the LEJOG ride at the end of may/beginning of june, and have been putting a few hours in the gym while the cold weather is with us.

Daft thing is I have no idea which type of bike I need to buy!! Have been to a few bike shops and have been told different things - some recommend the hybrid bike, others the tourer bike. :?

Can anyone who has done the ride, or does do long distance cycling please recommend which type of bike would be best.

Many thanks for your help

Simon

vernon
Posts: 1584
Joined: 8 Jan 2007, 6:03pm
Location: Meanwood, Leeds

Re: LEJOG - What type of bike?

Postby vernon » 25 Jan 2007, 7:02pm

simontheref wrote:Hi,

Am doing the LEJOG ride at the end of may/beginning of june, and have been putting a few hours in the gym while the cold weather is with us.

Daft thing is I have no idea which type of bike I need to buy!! Have been to a few bike shops and have been told different things - some recommend the hybrid bike, others the tourer bike. :?

Can anyone who has done the ride, or does do long distance cycling please recommend which type of bike would be best.

Many thanks for your help

Simon


You will get lots of answers and some disagreements on this question.

For what it's worth I've done it both ways and used a second hand Dawes Galaxy costing the princely sum of £200. On the ride, most of the riders doing LEJOG were using tourers (nearly 2/3) with hybrids accounting for the remaining (1/3) a group of sixth formers that I met were using racing/road bikes. It is possible to use any bike for the ride and I am sure that Bromptons and other less obvious bikes have been used.

One thing that might influence your choice is the the type of accommodation that you want to use along with the pace at which you want to ride and whether or not you will have support.

If you are using B&B and are fully supported with a van then racing bikes are perfectly matched to the job. If you are riding unsupported and B&B then hybrids or tourers with panniers are fine as they are should you be going the whole hog and camp unsupported like I did.

There's no substitute for getting the miles in on the road and the weather has been mild enough for me to get in 65-70 mile rides every weekend since mid December on my trusty Galaxy. I just might go for another End to End this year using a newly acquired Flying Gate bike.

Get your hands on a bike asap and get out onto the road to harden up your butt. You will be sitting on it for a long time during the ride so you might as well get it used to the idea sooner rather than later :lol:

User avatar
Simon L6
Posts: 1382
Joined: 4 Jan 2007, 12:43pm

Postby Simon L6 » 25 Jan 2007, 7:02pm

are you

camping?
b and b ing?
hotelling?
going fully supported?

going on main roads?
going on minor roads?
going off road at times?

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 51004
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Postby Mick F » 25 Jan 2007, 8:44pm

I agree with all that's been said, plus:

I've done it on a road bike. Panniers first, then a trailer the second time both ways.

My choice is a road bike, it is far more efficient at rolling along the road. Road bikes are lighter and faster, tourers slightly heavier and slower due to wider and lower gear ratios.

Hybrids are a hybrid between a road bike and an off-road bike - not good at either, in my opinion.

The main thing though, is to get a bike that fits you, a bike you like, and a bike you'll want to use after your E2E. Buy it, and get used to it before you set out.

Mick F. Cornwall