pannier help

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
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al_yrpal
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Re: pannier help

Postby al_yrpal » 12 Oct 2011, 9:44am

Yes, the tent is large, its a Coleman Avior X3, nominally a 3 person tent. A tall person can sit up comfortably in it and there is plenty of room. There is also a voluminous Decathlon sleeping bag and a Halfords backpacker airbed in there. I believe in comfort, eschewing horrid little tents, uncomfortable sleeping mats and eye wateringly expensive down sleeping bags. Substance over style! That lot weighs about 6kg in total, including the totally waterproof Crane Creek bag. But, the very stiff and stable Carrera Subway is totally unfazed, and is absolutely rock solid.
I had a look at the latest rack mountings on the latest Arrans. They do not look as good as mine.

Use caution

Al
Last edited by al_yrpal on 12 Oct 2011, 3:27pm, edited 1 time in total.
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. What do you do to make a difference?

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Re: pannier help

Postby Vorpal » 12 Oct 2011, 1:48pm

How to haul a load on a bicycle is half practicality & half personal choice.

Personally, I prefer to minimise as much as possible what I start out with. If I take panniers bigger than I need, I always end up carrying more than I need. I've never used front panniers. I've never used big panniers.

My advice: have a look at the threads about what to carry. Decide what you'll need, gather it all together & figure out how much space it takes (carrier bags? commuting panniers?) and how much it weighs, then decide how you want to carry it. When you figure that out, look at the threads relating to the types of equipment (rear panniers? front panniers? bar bag? saddle bag? etc.). Then, come back and ask more specific questions, if you need to.

Otherwise, you'll just get a bunch of opinions: two panniers are the way to go! No! it's got to be four panniers! I wouldn't trade my trailer for anything! :lol: :lol:
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Fleetfut
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Re: pannier help

Postby Fleetfut » 12 Oct 2011, 1:57pm

Carradice Carradry panniers get my vote. Bought them for touring and they are great. Plenty of room to fit in camping gear, clothes, etc etc. Thats just the rear panniers.

hazecellar
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Re: pannier help

Postby hazecellar » 12 Oct 2011, 4:41pm

brilliant - thanks everybody for your help - i knew there would be somebody out there answer but there were loads - i value all your opinions as i have no experience in carrying loads and always travel very light and now it has gave me plenty of food for thought . thanks for your time . i know i could trawl through all the other posts to try and find help but there is so much on here and i struggle to find time so i really do appreciate that you took time to answer

ossie
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Re: pannier help

Postby ossie » 13 Oct 2011, 6:50pm

hazecellar wrote:brilliant - thanks everybody for your help - i knew there would be somebody out there answer but there were loads - i value all your opinions as i have no experience in carrying loads and always travel very light and now it has gave me plenty of food for thought . thanks for your time . i know i could trawl through all the other posts to try and find help but there is so much on here and i struggle to find time so i really do appreciate that you took time to answer



Hi I did France Spain to UK in June. I had 2 Altura Arrans on the rear (they didnt fall off) and 2 deuters on the front.

You dont need waterproof panniers. I use B & Q rubble sacks, saved a shed load of money and the beauty of sacks is that you can leave the wet dirty panniers on your bike and take the sacks with all of your stuff into the tent porch / or tent where you can access stuff at your will.

If I was touring on a more regular basis I would go for higher quality but these have lasted me fine so far. I just replace the rubble sacks when they look a bit worn.

Malaconotus
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Re: pannier help

Postby Malaconotus » 13 Oct 2011, 7:50pm

No one has mentioned Vaude. Working in an LBS I had opportunity to try out every brand mentioned on my bike (although not to set off on tour with them) I chose the Discover Pro as they represented the best value to me, considering waterproofness, pockets, quality of finish, ease and adjustability of attachment, stiffness of backplate etc. All were test loaded and test fitted to my bike and these were the winners for me. Touring with them will soon prove whether I got it right, but I have previous experience of using Karrimor, Carradice, Basil and several other panniers and I am pretty confident I have made the right choice.

Goinridin
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Re: pannier help

Postby Goinridin » 15 Oct 2011, 8:05pm

Ortliebs get my vote. I went over the Pyrenees last year coast to coast and up to Bordeaux with Ortlieb panniers front and back and they were brilliant. Like the wise sage says..........You get what you pay for........Same goes for the Terra Nova tent, but that's another story.

Mattie
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Re: pannier help

Postby Mattie » 14 Nov 2011, 7:19pm

I was thinking about the design of Ortliebs and whether they are the best thing for bikes that don't have a prop stand. It seems to me that Ortliebs, being German, are designed for the continental bikes that use a prop stand, rather than for British touring bikes that you have to lay on the ground or lean against walls etc.

The same for their method of fastening to the rack does not look to be so good for the sideways forces that are involved in picking a bike up off the ground. Maybe if you have a touring bike that has to be laid on its side, or leant against walls, then a tougher Carradice type fabric would be better.

Just a thought.

Reigncloud
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Re: pannier help

Postby Reigncloud » 15 Nov 2011, 10:14am

al_yrpal wrote:Here are the Arrans. They cannot jump off if they are properly mounted, two metal pawls underneath the side rails prevent that.


Not sure if they've changed the mounting system for the Arrans, but I think the ones that the poster above doesn't like are the ones shown on the 36L size here:
[url]
http://www.sjscycles.com/supersize/22434.jpg[/url]

The larger 46L size has the different Rixen Kaul click system which I've used for 6 years and many thousand of km without fail or any jumping off.

fatboy
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Re: pannier help

Postby fatboy » 15 Nov 2011, 10:22am

New Arrans won't jump off if you do up the metal pawl. Earlier ones did not have this and they can jump off. I retrofitted Carradice Super-C rails to mine to prevent this.
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foxyrider
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Re: pannier help

Postby foxyrider » 27 Nov 2011, 3:24pm

Mattie wrote:I was thinking about the design of Ortliebs and whether they are the best thing for bikes that don't have a prop stand. It seems to me that Ortliebs, being German, are designed for the continental bikes that use a prop stand, rather than for British touring bikes that you have to lay on the ground or lean against walls etc.

The same for their method of fastening to the rack does not look to be so good for the sideways forces that are involved in picking a bike up off the ground. Maybe if you have a touring bike that has to be laid on its side, or leant against walls, then a tougher Carradice type fabric would be better.

Just a thought.


Well, if they are fitted correctly they are much more secure than the fussy fittings on Caradice and some of the, no make that all of the Altura bags. Like a previous poster i work in an IBD so i get to check this stuff out. As for durability, my Ortlieb roller classics are nearly ten years old, have done long tours every year plus a bit of commuting and nothing has given out up to now. They did suffer a puncture four years ago, a snake bite, quite literally - a viper bit one of my bags whilst i was doing the Ostseekust route in north Germany!

A set of 'supposedly' waterproof Altura traditional bags weigh @ 3kg, back rollers weigh in at half that for the same or more capacity. (bag capacity quoted does not just include the main compartment, all those pockets and nets on the lid and outside are included, so many '55l' bags would struggle to get 40l inside! Oh and remember thats for the pair not each.) Vaude are similar to the Ortliebs but the extra capacity and choice of closure methods sell Ortlieb nine out of ten times.

My heart goes out to that poor bike with all that stuff on the back - i hope its only ridden downhill! The handling and balance of that set up must be horrendous - the rule for loading a bike is 40% front, 60% rear or thereabouts, bike handles better, less damage to the rear wheel plus you avoid looking like a tramp on a bikewith stuff bungeed/strapped everywhere! :lol:
Convention? what's that then?
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loafer
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Re: pannier help

Postby loafer » 11 Jan 2012, 1:10pm

+1 for carradice still use the ones i got 25 years ago got 2 holes in just got a kit fron them and repaired them very easy.. :D and reproofed them tostill got years of use in them ...also have barbag -nelson longflap-top notch stuff very hard wearing and WATERPROOF .... :D

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alicej
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Re: pannier help

Postby alicej » 11 Jan 2012, 6:11pm

foxyrider wrote:you avoid looking like a tramp on a bikewith stuff bungeed/strapped everywhere! :lol:

I love looking like that on tour - gets lots of friendly waves :D

My partner had a nasty incident with panniers which only hooked over the rack and didn't also hook under to stop them bouncing off. He was OK but the pannier got stuck in between rack and spokes and wrenched the rack off on one side. Ouch.

Worth bearing in mind that if you go for one of the good quality, well known brands then you'll be able to sell them on ebay after your tour for very nearly as much as you paid for them, they really hold their value.

Malaconotus
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Re: pannier help

Postby Malaconotus » 12 Jan 2012, 12:25am

alicej wrote:
foxyrider wrote:you avoid looking like a tramp on a bikewith stuff bungeed/strapped everywhere! :lol:

I love looking like that on tour - gets lots of friendly waves :D


While I love my sleek new matching front and rear Vaude/Tubus set-up, I kind of miss the tramp look myself....
IMG_0877.JPG

nmnm
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Re: pannier help

Postby nmnm » 12 Jan 2012, 1:12am

Stumpy wrote:
I have Altura Arrans 46 litres
Please don't buy these bags
A freak accident, maybe? These panniers use Industry-standard German (Rixen and Kaul) pannier rack fittings, actually a top end brand for such fittings, used by BMW motorbikes iirc, normally very solid.
EDIT: sorry, this point addressed above by faster typers than me.
Last edited by nmnm on 12 Jan 2012, 1:20am, edited 1 time in total.