Best Panniers For Touring

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
surlygirly

Best Panniers For Touring

Post by surlygirly »

I'm off on a two week tour and am contemplating the best possible pannier. Currently I use one of my classic Ortlieb Back Roller for commuting into work. This pannier is fine, and keeps stuff dry.

For touring I've heard it's best to have around 60 litre capacity on the back. The most Ortlieb do is 40.

How much capacity do people find they need? Can anyone recommend some panniers?

I'm touring with my husband, so we'll be sharing the load. But we're going to be carrying camping equipment etc, but won't be too far from shops, so can buy food and stuff from day to day.

By the way, I'm sorted for the front panniers, I'll just be using Ortlieb's Front Rollers, which I think amount to 25L.
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georgew
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Post by georgew »

A couple of the large Ortlieb panniers on the back should really encompass all you need for cycle-camping, especially if these are combined with front panniers.
Travelling with a partner should also mean that it's easier as the load will be shared. The great danger is in taking far too much stuff and it pays to be ruthless when choosing what to take.
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Paul Smith SRCC
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Post by Paul Smith SRCC »

A good theory to spread the load over the whole bike as apposed to just taking the whole luggage load on the rear, I even use the smaller front panniers on the front and rear to achieve just that, the front panniers simply being smaller panniers, that fit just as well on a rear pannier rack

Paul Smith
www.bikeplus.co.uk

georgew wrote:A couple of the large Ortlieb panniers on the back should really encompass all you need for cycle-camping, especially if these are combined with front panniers.
Travelling with a partner should also mean that it's easier as the load will be shared. The great danger is in taking far too much stuff and it pays to be ruthless when choosing what to take.
Tallis the Tortoise

Post by Tallis the Tortoise »

I find that carradice super C rears (54l) and a 7l barbag swallow everything that I need for summer UK cycle camping, including the (very compact) saunders jetpacker tent and lightweight sleeping bag: nothing on the outside except lights and water bottles.

Ortleib 40l rears and 25l fronts should give similar capacity.

Andy :-)
Will
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Post by Will »

Why not just add an Ortlieb Rack Pack (small=24l) to your current set-up?

Will
AMC
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Post by AMC »

60L sounds like a lot to me. Spreading the load is good & sticking with small front & back panniers would be ideal as long as your tent & poles fit. I cycle camp (on my own & with my partner) using rear Ortlieb Bike Packer Classics, Sport Packer front & an Ortlieb bar bag. They're never full but I still think I take too much gear! I use the front ones for the stove & food, the tent (which goes in a waterproof bag), bag, clothes, tools etc go in the back. I can't manage without a bar bag for faffing with gloves, sunglasses, camera etc. I also use a Raleigh rear rack pack - more for the convenience of all the pockets & for easy access to a waterproof than for the space, I must admit. My great addiction is drawstring net bags, the kind you're supposed to use to wash smalls in the washing machine; very good to be able to find things & drag them out of the panniers without too much rummaging around...
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speedsixdave
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Post by speedsixdave »

Stuff expands to fit the space available: if you get bigger panniers, you'll just be tempted to fill them with stuff you don't really need.

With front & rear panniers (60l total), and sharing the tent between you, you should have plenty of capacity already.
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horizon
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Post by horizon »

It's definitely possible to physically and safely attach too much stuff to a bike when camping. Two rear panniers and two front with the tent on the rack is a good limit. But all that unused spare capacity......!
Richard
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Post by Richard »

I'll get in before mickf does - why not take a look at a trailer - I've got a carryfreedom y frame and it's great. Definitely worth a look, even if you reject the idea. http://www.carryfreedom.com/
treejamie

Post by treejamie »

I'll jump on this bandwagon.

I currently have one of my Vaude panniers left. teh hard plastic back on one cracked and on the hook mounts snapped on teh other so i now have one working pannier. I've been very pleased with their peformance. So far everyhting has been kept dry.

I was thinking of getting some Altura drylines (front rear adn bar bag) does anyone have any opinions on these. i trust Altura and Edinburgh Bicycle that they are good but i was more after any end user reviews or a comparison to a similar product. Being one of my local shops i would prefer to shop at the co-op.

any reviews etc would be most welcome, i'd prefer not to get a trailer as i have no where to store it (the shed is cramped already with 3 bikes)

Jamie
woodsinho

Post by woodsinho »

treejamie wrote:I'll jump on this bandwagon.

I currently have one of my Vaude panniers left. teh hard plastic back on one cracked and on the hook mounts snapped on teh other so i now have one working pannier. I've been very pleased with their peformance. So far everyhting has been kept dry.

I was thinking of getting some Altura drylines (front rear adn bar bag) does anyone have any opinions on these. i trust Altura and Edinburgh Bicycle that they are good but i was more after any end user reviews or a comparison to a similar product. Being one of my local shops i would prefer to shop at the co-op.

any reviews etc would be most welcome, i'd prefer not to get a trailer as i have no where to store it (the shed is cramped already with 3 bikes)

Jamie


I just did a LEJOG with Altura drylines in some absolutely awful weather and not one little drop of water got in. They are quite heavy in themselves but very very durable - did the trick for me.
Pete

Arkel Panniers - can't be beat.

Post by Pete »

If you like to organise your stuff for quick retrieval etc. and want something that will last for many many years, then without doubt you seriously need to have a look at a pair of Arkel GT54 panniers. Do a Google on Arkel GT54 reviews, or have a look at their website at their website at www.panniers.com or the GT54s can be seen directly by going to http://www.arkel-od.com/panniers/gt54/o ... fl=1&site= .

I bought a pair at the York Rally last year and now ride completely self contained touring with two rear panniers. My tebt even fits in the removable 'tube' pocket leaving the rack completely free for any food or bits and pieces I might buy during the day.

One previous criticism used to be that the hook system didn't lock on as well as Ortliebs and that the very tough aluminium (yes, not plastic) hoks would scratch the paint off your rack. This has now been fixed with their new cam-lock system. Check it out on their website. They're built in canada and the shipping to the UK is quick and very cheap. They're also really genuinely decent people to deal with.

Sure they're not cheap, and they're not light, but ask anyone who has had a serious look at them or used them for any length of time and they will tell you that these really are the undisputed Rolls Royce of panniers.

Hope this helps,

Pete.
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dkmwt
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Post by dkmwt »

I have Altura Orkney 56 Dryline rear panniers I haven't done any touring with them but I can get load of shopping in them. As woodsinho says they are quite bulky but I've never taken anything wet out of them. As for attachment/removal they just hook onto your rack and automatically lock on. To take them off just press the red button which is right buy the handle and lift. They also have shoulder straps for carrying when not on the bike
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Tallis the Tortoise

Post by Tallis the Tortoise »

I should add after my last post that a friend of mine got carradice suyper C panniers a couple of weeks ago for a tour that we've just finished (OK, we got the train the last 50m due to rain, wind and mechanical probs) and they were not as good for apparent durability, waterproofness or ease opf fiting and removing than mine (brought 2 years ago and used heavily) are. Seems that they have "improved" things :cry:

Andy
montmorency
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Post by montmorency »

I use the classic Ortlieb roller style.

While they are waterproof, you do have to be careful to roll up the tops carefully to guarantee this.

By the same token, if any water does get in, it stays there, since it can't leak away!

Some people may not like the fact that they are just one big container, with no subdivisions (presumably this helps to eliminate seams, one possible source of leaks).

I find them fabulous for shopping and quite good for commuting.

They will certainly do the job while touring, providing you can live with the lack of separate compartments.



Regards,
M.
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