Stands on touring bikes (and pumps)

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
Husker Du

Stands on touring bikes (and pumps)

Postby Husker Du » 27 Aug 2007, 12:53am

Hi, I am going to do my first long distance ride (JOGLE) in 3 weeks time. I've spent a lot of time reading blogs and attempted to buy kit and bikes wisely (briefly, Dawes Super Galaxy, 2 x Carradice 50 litres on rear, saddlebag, 2 x changes of cycle gear, 1 of civvies). My tools consist of a Topeak Alien 2 multitool, tyre levers, spare inner tube and some tape. Doesn't seem much point taking anything else, I would be clueless if it did go wrong.
Questions for the real cyclists are these: would you consider fitting a stand, if so are the rear stands stable enough on a loaded bike? (the kickstands that mount on the rear wheel). There are motorcycle-type stands that fit under the bottom bracket and form a fork, are they worth the weight? Last question is, can anybody recommend a decent hand pump that is man enough (and light enough to carry) for the Schwalbe Marathons? I am led to believe the tyres are quite tough (and a swine to get off), but they need about 90psi.
Incidentally, If you are a newbie like me and are stocking up on the all the kit, you could do worse than look at www.wiggle.co.uk. I found other sites that that had individual items (not the bike) a bit cheaper, but few had their range, and any orders over £100 had 20% off, as well as any other discounts. I have had a few goodies off of E-bay, where do the rest of you go? Thanks for looking.

vernon
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Re: Stands on touring bikes (and pumps)

Postby vernon » 27 Aug 2007, 4:31am

Husker Du wrote:Hi, I am going to do my first long distance ride (JOGLE) in 3 weeks time. I've spent a lot of time reading blogs and attempted to buy kit and bikes wisely (briefly, Dawes Super Galaxy, 2 x Carradice 50 litres on rear, saddlebag, 2 x changes of cycle gear, 1 of civvies). My tools consist of a Topeak Alien 2 multitool, tyre levers, spare inner tube and some tape. Doesn't seem much point taking anything else, I would be clueless if it did go wrong.
Questions for the real cyclists are these: would you consider fitting a stand, if so are the rear stands stable enough on a loaded bike? (the kickstands that mount on the rear wheel). There are motorcycle-type stands that fit under the bottom bracket and form a fork, are they worth the weight? Last question is, can anybody recommend a decent hand pump that is man enough (and light enough to carry) for the Schwalbe Marathons? I am led to believe the tyres are quite tough (and a swine to get off), but they need about 90psi.
Incidentally, If you are a newbie like me and are stocking up on the all the kit, you could do worse than look at www.wiggle.co.uk. I found other sites that that had individual items (not the bike) a bit cheaper, but few had their range, and any orders over £100 had 20% off, as well as any other discounts. I have had a few goodies off of E-bay, where do the rest of you go? Thanks for looking.


I've never used a stand finding trees, wall and miscellaneous street furniture sufficient for my needs. I have used a Crank Brothers in the past but currently use a Zefal frame mounted pump. The latter delivers more air per pump stroke.

As for buyng kit - I use my local bike shop unless there's an outrageous saving to be made i.e. 50% off a £50 quid item as I'd like my bike shop to be there to build and repair wheels, offer advice, and be there for same day face to face service six days out of seven.

GeoffL
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Postby GeoffL » 27 Aug 2007, 7:44am

I've got a chainstay bridge mounted propstand on my hybrid. However, I got it because I sometimes use a trailer and probably wouldn't have fitted it otherwise. It does come in handy, but nine times out of ten there's a convenient tree, fence, lamppost, et al. against which to lean the bike, so it isn't a necessity - and on an end-to-end it's probably unnecessary weight.

Those twin-leg stands can damage your frame. For example, for the Pletscher stand, SJS give dire warnings that:
Voids Thorn frame warranty, may crush thin walled chainstays if the bike is heavily loaded or leaned on.
... so not recommended for a long trip while heavily loaded.

For info, here's the thread where I asked for recommendations. As you'll see from that, IME some propstands and heavy loading don't mix!

HTH,

Geoff

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helenst
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Pump

Postby helenst » 27 Aug 2007, 12:34pm

For pump, I can highly recommend the Topeak Roadmorph. It's light, and really can cope with those high pressure tyres. On our northern Europe tour last year we took a cheap mini pump, got a couple of punctures and really sweated to get tyres to about 60psi before giving up. Got a Roadmorph for the Spain/Portugal tour and absolutely brilliant - I ride on Marathons too and had no problem getting them to 90psi (and I am a small woman with no upper body strength!) It's got nice foldy-out bits so you can use it like a floor pump, and even has a little gauge.

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Cyclefrance
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Postby Cyclefrance » 27 Aug 2007, 4:07pm

I tend to go with the flow so far as stands are concerned - a perhaps nice to have, but certainly not something to worry about if it's not there.

As to pumps - I bought a Cyclaire about 18 months ago and thoroughly recommend it - no problem pumping up to 110 psi if you want to go to that level and a very compact unit - I bought a triangular frame bag off ebay that has a top pouch that takes the pump perfectly. Don't make the mistake of getting the mini 'Rapid' version though as this is max 85 psi and meant for mountain bikes.

Details of the pump at

http://www.cyclaire.com/

PW
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Postby PW » 27 Aug 2007, 11:28pm

I wouldn't use a stand - too much chance of damaging the bike & a touring load is heavy enough anyway. Pump, Zefal HPX.
If at first you don't succeed - cheat!!

lloyd

Postby lloyd » 28 Aug 2007, 2:49pm

Questions for the real cyclists are these: would you consider fitting a stand, if so are the rear stands stable enough on a loaded bike? (the kickstands that mount on the rear wheel). There are motorcycle-type stands that fit under the bottom bracket and form a fork, are they worth the weight? Last question is, can anybody recommend a decent hand pump that is man enough (and light enough to carry) for the Schwalbe Marathons? I am led to believe the tyres are quite tough (and a swine to get off), but they need about 90psi.


Not sure whether I'm a real cyclist, but I've done a few tours so here goes...
I've not bothered with a stand, instead I just look for something to lean it against. I think with panniers any stand would be unstable, though the continentals often have this accessory.
Pump - like Helenst above I'd higly recommend the Topeak Roadmorph, not cheap but it's got a gauge, is fairly compact and it's big advantage is that it can be used like a small track pump, so getting those high pressures isn't a great problem.

nobby
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Postby nobby » 28 Aug 2007, 9:10pm

Josie Dew is a real cyclist and she has a stand fitted.
On the other hand, there is always something to lean it against or lay it on its side with derailleur uppermost.
Something I've wondered about: why have the derailleur on the right when you get off the bike on the left? It is natural to lean it against the gear side at risk of damaging it.

Creamcrackered
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Postby Creamcrackered » 29 Aug 2007, 8:08am

I toured for many years without a stand, but fitted one for my long tour last year. Now I am a convert. They do make life an awful lot easier and save wear on you panniers from where you lean the bike up against things. The ones that fit on the chainstays (near the rear axle) are fine - of these the Hebie 611 is the best of the bunch.

fatboy
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Postby fatboy » 29 Aug 2007, 8:50am

nobby wrote:Josie Dew is a real cyclist and she has a stand fitted.
On the other hand, there is always something to lean it against or lay it on its side with derailleur uppermost.
Something I've wondered about: why have the derailleur on the right when you get off the bike on the left? It is natural to lean it against the gear side at risk of damaging it.


Josie Dew rides an expedition tourer and had it custom built. I guess she checked it with the makers that it'd be alright. The issue of which side the chain is on is probably down to us driving on the "wrong side".

On the issue of stands I've got a single leg stand which is fine with a bare bike but useless with panniers. Still handy for cycle-train commuting. I can use my crossbar as a book rest for my early morning read when I'm tired!
"Marriage is a wonderful invention; but then again so is the bicycle puncture repair kit." - Billy Connolly

fatboy
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Postby fatboy » 29 Aug 2007, 8:58am

I like the Specialized air tool mini. It seems to give a good lot of pressure (when you take it off you get a satisfying high pressure thump sound) and is OK (if not a bit tedious) for completly inflating flat tyres. Not good for MTB tyres as it's too low volume
"Marriage is a wonderful invention; but then again so is the bicycle puncture repair kit." - Billy Connolly

glueman
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Postby glueman » 31 Aug 2007, 9:46pm

In the UK stands are deemed rather naff but what do we know? I've seen plenty of expensive German and Dutch tourers with them. Well behaved bikes turn into capricious blighters once they get panniers, dashing themselves to the ground at the first opportunity.
Our old custom tandem had a rear drag brake which could be used as a parking brake. If you can rig your solo's brakes to stay on bikes behave much better when parked and it acts as an effective theft deterrent.

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Neil F
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Postby Neil F » 31 Aug 2007, 10:44pm

In june/july I completed JOGLE with my Dawes loaded up with camping gear. I had a stand fitted, the single leg type, but it was not very useful. The problem came with the loaded bike. The weight was to much for it and the stand bent. When the ground had a slope the bike would fall over. After a week I took if off and posted it back home. I always found somewhere to prop the bike up and saved the weight. I used a pair of marathon plus tyres and had no punctures but one of the inner tubes gave up and I had no problems changing the inner tube on the cyclepath I was on. I found the tyres run best at 95psi.

glueman
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Postby glueman » 1 Sep 2007, 1:34pm

The problem with prop stands is they're chunky, after-market items. I reckon if say, Longstaff or Robin Mather offered an option of a finely made, colour matched, discretely tucked away, extendable support, everyone would want one.
It's another case of our domestic sporting tradition holding back a perfectly practical accessory so that it's never developed.

nobby
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Postby nobby » 1 Sep 2007, 2:57pm

glueman wrote:The problem with prop stands is they're chunky, after-market items. I reckon if say, Longstaff or Robin Mather offered an option of a finely made, colour matched, discretely tucked away, extendable support, everyone would want one.
It's another case of our domestic sporting tradition holding back a perfectly practical accessory so that it's never developed.


I think that you are spot on there.
I've been away from cycling for a long time and think that mountain bike development has done more for touring bike development than 'our sporting tradition' has ever done; setting aside blood transfusions and class A drugs, of course.