Reducing pannier weight

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
bainbridge
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby bainbridge » 17 Mar 2015, 9:53pm

rannochraider wrote:If you are going to replace the contents of your panniers with similar in Titanium you will save the weight of what was in your wallet for sure! Cycling and camping Light generally means expensive. Having said that I'll be watching this thread as I'm not at all experienced either. I'd love to see an inventory of what the experienced guys call a list of ' essentials' (items and brands)for a 2 week plus tour ?


The padlock I was on about is called "Titalium". Rather than being made out of titanium it's made from some sort of aircraft alloy: http://www.abus.com/uk/Security-at-Home ... s/TITALIUM

They're £8 for a pair (one for the bike and one for hostel lockers). Granted, this won't provide the level of security as the D-lock but there's no point in using an ultra secure lock on a wire whip because the thief would destroy the weakest link: The wire whip.


al_yrpal wrote:Weigh your clothes one by one and choose the lightest stuff its surprising with things like tee shirts and trousers what a massive overall saving can be made. Your shoe plan is spot on.

Al



You're right about that Al; I bought what I thought was a light pair of slim stretch jeans for evening wear but they weigh in at a whopping 534g! Now looking for some lightweight "slacks" :)


Thanks for posting the lightweight touring link nmnm it's very interesting.


Whoof you're spot on about cotton; it's heavy and desn;t perform well (I took loads of cotton last time). Man made fibres this time such as coolmax etc.

Tangled Metal thanks for sharing your practical experiences around carrying weight.

PH wrote:I think your idea with the shoes and whoof's suggestion that you go for clothes suitable on and off the bike is probably the biggest saving you'll make without compromising comfort too much. Though I like a change of footwear and take a 350g pair of sandals.


A friend gave me a great idea: Hotel slippers! He gave me a pair, advising they're widely available in pound shops (wonder how much they are :) ) and would be great for mooching around hostels after a long day in the saddle. They don't look like they'll last long but at 65g per pair I'll buy a couple more pairs to make the total 3 and chuck away a pair per week when they're knackered.


foxyrider thanks for your tips, you're spot on about the weight of some luggage being an important factor to consider. My old Agu panniers are very light (but admittedly not completely waterproof) but the Altura Dryline rackpack is considerably heavier (for what it can carry), however it's so easy to unclip it, extend the shoulder strap and carry as a manbag containing valuables that it's worth it's weight. Plus it is waterproof.

axel_knutt wrote:My problem is preventing the panniers getting heavier, because I have kit which is getting tatty and needs throwing out, but can't find replacements. .


I know what you mean, my old panniers are really light, roomy with pockets, easy to get at stuff and easy to quickly do up but most of the ones I see now have sacrificed much of this in the quest to be completely waterproof.

jgurney wrote:If your budget will stand it, look at lightweight clothing from firms like Rohan.

I have some of their t-shirts with weight and volume less than half than of typical cotton ones, and a 'spark' insulated top which weighs very little but is very snug and water-resistant (and reversible between yellow or dark blue).


Thanks I'll look at getting some Rohan stuff, still need a few more bits.

nmnm wrote:Foxy mentioned pool sandals. I made probably my best ever gram per £ saving by replacing a pair of pool sandals with another pair of the same. The old ones were 200g, the new were 120g or something, and £3 at tesco, because the soles were sort of blown foam rather than molded rubber. You can spend a lot to get 80g out of a cassette or a crankset!


That's a great idea. Maybe a pair of foamy flip flops is a viable alternative to hotel slippers? They'll last and weigh very little.

Thanks for your tips, any more will be much appreciated and if I find out any more I'll post them here too.

Tangled Metal
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Tangled Metal » 18 Mar 2015, 7:49am

I got my first flip-flops since growing up last year and after the uncomfortableness of the between the toes bit had gone I found them actually very comfortable. This was car camping with family so I had a whole set of shoes for just in case but I often wore these. Mine were expensive Teva ones though, a guilty expense. Definitely a good footwear option for feet recovery IME.

If you do like Rohan then try and get to one of their stores for bargains but especially their one in IIRC Long Preston. Not sure if that was where they started but it is where they have bargain bins and sell stuff off very cheap. that is proper stuf still going well in their shops and online sales not just end of line and didn't sell well stuff. personally never found them any good since they changed the original uplanders trousers. Talk about cockroaches and these trousers surviving anything!!! I only grew out of mine or I;d still have them.

Tangled Metal
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Tangled Metal » 18 Mar 2015, 8:05am

On a side matter, one thing I learnt fairly early on when I was into lightweight backpacking (slightly related) was about being organized in your packing. It won't reduce weight in itself but getting a system together where everything has it's place I found very useful. In a storm on top of a hill with your tarp close to blowing away it is always useful to know where you've got some spare cord for additional guy line and some other piece of kit that you can improvise to keep your shelter together. Everything in it's place in your sack or panniers/bar bag and also when you pitch camp. Put things in the same place.

I think it also helps when you get home so you don't forgt something or put something extra in. That last one was a bad habit I had. When nothing was kept in a set place I had to run around the house looking for things. That meant I spotted things that "were useful". Those ended up in my bags too, but that stopped when I kept certain types of kit together ready to go.

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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby eileithyia » 18 Mar 2015, 8:14am

Easy small pair of front panniers carried as rear ones, if it doesn't fit it doesn't go, double up on long sleeve cycling tops as evening wear, cycling shoes for bad weather walking about, lightweight sandals for other times, washing liquid and wash stuff, keep hold of small soaps, containers from hotels etc to carry shampoo etc., use a small under arm roll on to save weight and space.
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jk49
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby jk49 » 18 Mar 2015, 10:04am

Re: cookware. I have used home made coke can stoves for a few years now. They work really well and are very light. Also very cheap to make with home made trivet and wind shield. Then a couple of years ago I bought a honey stove. This is a foldable wood burning stove, weighs almost nothing and folds down to about the size of ten playing cards.
The wood burner provides a nice support for the coke can, if I can't burn wood for any reason( some wild camps or pernikity campsites). Because I mainly burn wood I don't carry any more than 200ml of meths for the coke can, but that's still enough for a couple of meals and a few brews when necessary. I can also use a smidge of meths to light the wood burner.Using only wood as I do for probably 90% of the time, means unlimited brews and meals that can be cooked fully from basic ingredients, because of unlimited fuel supply.
Downsides are a bit more management of the stove when cooking and you end up smelling like a kipper!

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Mick F
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Mick F » 18 Mar 2015, 11:06am

A tip I read from a seasoned traveller/holidaymaker, is to take less luggage but more money.

Forget your panniers, just take a credit card. :wink:
Mick F. Cornwall

Ferial
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Ferial » 18 Mar 2015, 4:23pm

I Follow the rule of 1 on, 1 for spare and 1 in the wash. Light weight, quick-dry clothes + a tangier stove to save on meals. I survived 6 weeks through France & Spain like this.

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Heltor Chasca
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Heltor Chasca » 18 Mar 2015, 5:15pm

Ferial wrote:I Follow the rule of 1 on, 1 for spare and 1 in the wash. Light weight, quick-dry clothes + a tangier stove to save on meals. I survived 6 weeks through France & Spain like this.


Best tip so far Similar system I used when a backpacker. The only time it didn't work was one area on the Moçambican border where you had to carry your own firewood in!

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matt2matt2002
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby matt2matt2002 » 18 Mar 2015, 7:00pm

Great tips here. Many thanks to everyone.
I am flying to Turkey in June so thought I would have the added twist of a luggage limit.

Amazingly it is 40 Kilo. ( bike separate weight allowance ). So its not weight that will be limiting my packing but size.
If its not the weight that gets you, its the volume!
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Vinko
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Vinko » 18 Mar 2015, 7:28pm

al_yrpal wrote:Weigh your clothes one by one and choose the lightest stuff its surprising with things like tee shirts and trousers what a massive overall saving can be made. Your shoe plan is spot on.

Al


:D I am not sure that taking massive overalls are going to help :lol:

(he..he....sorry al :D)

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foxyrider
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby foxyrider » 18 Mar 2015, 7:50pm

matt2matt2002 wrote:Great tips here. Many thanks to everyone.
I am flying to Turkey in June so thought I would have the added twist of a luggage limit.

Amazingly it is 40 Kilo. ( bike separate weight allowance ). So its not weight that will be limiting my packing but size.
If its not the weight that gets you, its the volume!


Buy one of those large laundry bags - you can get 4 panniers and a few other bits in one - you'll look like a migrant but what the heck! cost is a couple of quid and it folds down small enough to sit in the bottom of a bag for the trip. :D
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby PH » 19 Mar 2015, 8:33am

Ferial wrote:I Follow the rule of 1 on, 1 for spare and 1 in the wash. Light weight, quick-dry clothes + a tangier stove to save on meals. I survived 6 weeks through France & Spain like this.


For the merino stuff I don't need the spare, wear one wash one, change when it's dry or I need it. It also helps to have a mid layer that is still comfortable next to the skin, just offers more options. I don't want to be washing all the time, twice on a two week tour is enough and only then if I need clean clothes for traveling home. I've never tested merino to it's limits, there's stories of people using it for weeks before it becomes smelly.

Paul Kirkwood
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby Paul Kirkwood » 19 Mar 2015, 8:38am

I have a few ideas on my blog:

http://greatbritishbikerides.net/touring-with-luggage/

Hope they help.

Paul.

simonhill
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby simonhill » 19 Mar 2015, 10:24am

PH - I don't think the most important reason for washing clothes is to stop you smelling!

I wash mine because they are next to my sensitive bits which I also keep clean. Old dirty smelly, bacterially infected clothes are a recipe for all sorts of fungal infections, nasty rashes, etc.

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BeeKeeper
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Re: Reducing pannier weight

Postby BeeKeeper » 19 Mar 2015, 11:45am

Mick F wrote:A tip I read from a seasoned traveller/holidaymaker, is to take less luggage but more money.

My wife does that, and on the return she does the reverse. More luggage and less money. :D