How many miles of training

Specific board for this popular undertaking.
Vorpal
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Vorpal » 11 May 2016, 8:45pm

denniswpearce wrote:Also not really understanding how the riding position on my Whyte Sussex can be so wrong. The riding position is what I think of as being a racing bike position for cycling. You are leaning forward from the saddle with your hands on the curved edge of the bars. Feels perfectly natural and normal compared to my last bike which was too big and I did struggle. This is why I went to the bike shop to get them to order a bike for my size.

I said that because you lean forward more, it can put pressure on soft tissue. I'm not certain about you position on the bike, but being saddle sore is often a symptom of incorrect set-up. So, people are suggesitng that the riding position is incorrect because you are complaining of sores.

If your sores were where you had briefs on, that probably explains the sores. Have you had sores before?

Cycling shorts aren't really meant as padding. Though we call them pads, and some even have gel in them, the idea is that they stay in place, in the layers in them move slightly against each other. So, cloth is rubbing cloth (or energy is absorbed by gel) and not skin. If you wear two pairs, they are more likely to move around, or one pair wrinkle or something.
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denniswpearce
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby denniswpearce » 11 May 2016, 9:03pm

Thanks Vorpal, I have not had sores before last weekend and yes they are where the briefs were. Lesson learned for that bit, so thanks.
Two of my saddles are gel seats and obviously you can push them in with your fingers, One is a "Charge" saddle and the other is the "Whyte" saddle. Have given up on the leather Brooks saddle. Time is tight now as June 6th is the start day and I will let my rear heal and then try one pair of padded bib shorts agin instead of two to see if it will feel right. Fingers crossed.
Many thanks.

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Paulatic
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How many miles of training

Postby Paulatic » 11 May 2016, 10:06pm

Hope you get your sores cleared and are able to fine tune your position so you don't feel the need for 2prs of shorts. Whilst you may think your skin thin and boney you also have the advantage of not being too heavy.
You are a number of years short of being the oldest to do E2E.
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=97645&p=907053&hilit=Tony+rathbone#p907053

P.s. I called in to visit Tony when I was in Keswick in April. Met one of his sons who told me Tony has had a few strokes and has been in hospital since last December.

Edit to put the right link in.
Last edited by Paulatic on 11 May 2016, 10:28pm, edited 1 time in total.
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eileithyia
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby eileithyia » 11 May 2016, 10:11pm

Snug fit; That is good as said these were various suggestions and comments i have picked up from other sources and can relay what i know.. without seeing you, your clothes or your set up on the bike. If you are happy they are a close fit... then that is fine. I have seen some in shorts that are so old baggy it is wonder they ever had any lycra in to start with. :lol:

Briefs, Extra shorts:- Al that extra padding could contribute to the problem rather than help. The briefs by rubbing and chafing, the extra shorts by rubbing against each other. I have had a pair of shorts where i feel the pad stays next to my skin, the outer lycra stays next to the saddle but the two pieces of material move on each other causing my saddle contact points to move to a different place.
Also that extra material can potentially cause far more pressure rather than a cushioning effect.

Still unsure as to the nature of the sores, you refer to sores but still imply extra pressure on your sit bones as though it is pressure and bruising, or maybe the sores are directly in the sit bone area?

No one has said your riding position is wrong, it is just a suggestion, if you are more upright you have more weight on your sit bones, if you are leaning forward a bit the weight is distributed more forward, I have already said without a photo no one can know this... perhaps your bike shop did advise on a correct size, but you still have to ensure the bike fit is correct... could someone locally advise on this ... again it is just a suggestion not a definite.

Shame regarding the doctor situation (what happens if someone is ill that day needs to be seen that day .. my GP has an arrangement to see on the day patients with an acute problem), sores, if it is a proper sore with red raised area and possible a head, can be a sign of an infection having got into the area.... and can be very difficult to deal with via the simple measures already suggested. Infected hair follicles can also be a cause of sores in the saddle region. Hence the need to be scrupulous with cleanliness and wash shorts daily (I take a small pot of napisan to soak and wash shorts with).
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Ardbeg
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Ardbeg » 15 May 2016, 9:41am

Thanks everyone

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Paul Smith SRCC
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Paul Smith SRCC » 14 Jun 2016, 1:03pm

When I was running the CTC shop I was often asked if I had any advice regarding tour preparation; for what it's worth here are a few tips from me:

If you have bought the right bike and all the correct gear how do you prepare for a cycle tour like ’LeJog’. For a healthy reasonably fit person with the correct preparation a two week 1,100 mile plus tour like that is an achievable challenge, it does strike quite a good balance between the tour being a holiday and something that you will be pleased you have achieved. As someone who has done this kind of tour a few times here are a few tips from me:

1) Get the miles in during the months leading upto the start of the tour, a typical day on something like ‘Lejog’ will normally have you on the road at about 8 to 9am until late afternoon, so try and do a few training rides that replicate that. However that’s not to say that the old saying of “all miles are good miles” doesn’t apply, when preparing for a tour it is indeed not a bad train of thought. Plan a a day ride that also replicate the style of terrain, potentially 'Gps System' of some kind where you can enjoy plotting them riding that route is something I know many find of value.

2) As well as making sure you get the right type of bike, make sure that when you start it’s in good working order, so many waste time on tour addressing what were avoidable maintenance issues when they should enjoying the holiday

3) It’s folly to invest hundreds if not thousands of pounds on a bike if it then isn’t set up to fit you correctly. Many will quite rightly take great care to get the correct style of bike, in the correct size, with all the correct clothing, shoes and kit, yet with all these important factors in place I so often see riders with the incorrect set up on the bike, so they have to try harder than they need do and often get aches and pains they don’t need to have as a result.

4) What will work on a single long day ride may not work quite as well on two weeks worth of long day rides. For example I like to eat at lunchtime and not graze on energy snacks all day, the latter I may often do on a Sunday over the familiar roads at home. Stopping on tour for lunch like this will probably have you feeling a bit lethargic when you get back on the bike, but personally I find this will pay dividends later in the ride and helps me to finish the day feeling good, as far as I am concerned there is no substitute for solid food, I use the popular energy products as a top up, not a substitute. Note that often at lunchtime you may not actually feel that hungry, be careful though for by the time you do it may be too late.

Another advantage of a lunch stop is that it mentally splits the ride into sections, novices often start a day concerned that they may have eighty miles ahead of them, this can seem daunting especially if starting in the rain and the forecast is not good, with a proper stop this splits to the ride into smaller less daunting and more achievable targets.

5) On a group tour, some you will find will treat each day as a stage of the Tour de France, others, novices especially, like to get it over and done with as they are nervous about reaching their goal, it's often the same faces that will reach the days end first each day, these riders may prefer the grazing theory as they will reach their destination much earlier. Personally I like to take my time, some of my best memories are the stops! Training for this ride will give you and indication of what style of tourer you are, for my ten pence worth it as much about enjoying the journey as it is about reaching the magnificence that is John O’Groats; after all it’s far easier to admire the view when you are not trying so hard that you are all boss eyed or concentrating so hard that all you are focusing on is the road in front of you.

6) I mentioned above that some of the first to reach the days end are not only the competitive types but the novices who may be a little anxious; to the former I say that’s great if that’s what you like to do, to the latter I say try not to be anxious, take your time and give yourself time, leave early not late so that you are not always clock watching at each stop, go at your pace and you will get there, in your own time; but you will get there
Last edited by Paul Smith SRCC on 21 Jun 2020, 2:36pm, edited 1 time in total.

DaveLewis
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby DaveLewis » 16 Jun 2016, 7:44am

I did one training ride of 40 ish miles on a brand new bike, just to check it out and get used to it. Then my first day was Lands End to Newquay, up and down 14 hills or more along the coast and 55 miles. I just did training on the way. No point getting worried about it. I think people get a bit carried away with too much planning. Far better to take the path less trodden on and see what happens. I was 16st, nearly 40 yrs old and hadn't been on a road bike since Uni when I did it. Wrote a best-selling book about it too. :D

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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Ardbeg » 18 Jun 2016, 4:20pm

Sadly, my ride is now off till next year. Two weeks ago I cycled to Aviemore(100 miles each way) to stay over and come back the next day. Route 7 was a disgrace and I hit a patch of gravel and came off. I landed on my head and ended up with both concussion and a whiplash injury. I will get my LEJOG early next year.

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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Tiberius » 18 Jun 2016, 5:25pm

DaveLewis wrote: I think people get a bit carried away with too much planning. Far better to take the path less trodden on and see what happens.



You think like I think....Top advice (IMHO)...... :wink:

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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Vorpal » 18 Jun 2016, 5:34pm

Ardbeg wrote:Sadly, my ride is now off till next year. Two weeks ago I cycled to Aviemore(100 miles each way) to stay over and come back the next day. Route 7 was a disgrace and I hit a patch of gravel and came off. I landed on my head and ended up with both concussion and a whiplash injury. I will get my LEJOG early next year.

Sorry to hear that. Heal well & swiftly.
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Retro biker
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby Retro biker » 28 Aug 2016, 7:52pm

Ardbeg wrote:I hope to do LEJOG later on this summer. I have been doing around 150 miles per week and am increasing this by 50 miles each month. I was going to keep training till I hit a 350 mile week. I hope to cover around 70 miles per day cycling for 7 days then having a day off before continuing to JOG.
Any suggestions?


i did it a few years ago' but JOGLE, over 5 days and trained hard for around six months, but mainly hill climes, with everything i would need in my cycle bags, and covering 150 miles a week in the peaks, as i think the toughest part of the ride is the hill climes in Scotland and lake-district, but it all really depends how many hours a day you what to spend in the saddle. but its a lovely ride and you won't regret it.

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Re: How many miles of training

Postby tojjer » 29 Aug 2016, 6:44pm

I would also say ride in all kinds of weather too, you never know what a LEJOG / JOGLE will throw at you.

denniswpearce
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby denniswpearce » 3 Sep 2016, 4:42pm

Just thought I should give an update on my supported Lejog back in the beginning of June this year.
I read lots of posts and prepared myself with a gradual build up of miles each week so that I was fit for the endurance the it is.
The event was a twelve day ride which I found to be both enjoyable and painful.
I have never been able to find the right combination to avoid getting saddle sore, its my sit bones that suffer after 25 miles. No solutions please as I have read many of your well intentioned posts and tried lots of things.
I did endure the event and completed up to day nine, ending the day in Crianlarich in Scotland.
Went passed some lovely scenery, over Clifton suspension bridge, the Iron bridge at Telford. Found Cornwall very nice but not a lover of all those hills. Same to for Devon. Did not like Warrington / Wigan area ( apologies to all those who come from there, but thats my view only.
Cumbria very pretty too.
Scotland too was very nice apart from the midges. Had to leave the bedroom windows closed at night because of them.
Hated the wet weather, found it pointless wearing gear to stop you getting wet. Normally I am a fair weather cyclist.
Did not like the lightning, sheltered under a bridge till it had moved away.
Loved the advice to keep snacking and drinking during the day as you are burning energy continuously.
Also found it was hard to get going again after stopping for a break as my body thought the ride was over for the day, but after five minutes of restarting I was back in the groove again. Several others found this too.

However when I got to Crianlarich, I woke up in the middle of the night with terrific pains in my side and elsewhere. That put paid to my Lejog and I caught the train back to Oxford the following morning leaving the rest of the guys, eight others to continue.
The following day I was in the John Radcliffe hospital with more intense pains which turned out to be kidney stones.
Thanks to everyone who gave me advice, which was very helpful.
Regarding my sit bones, I am going to a guy who checks your riding position etc and adjusts things. I believe he attaches things to you which is then captured and he can see what is right and wrong with the way you ride
Hope he can help me.
Only met one other person doing the event along the way until I got to the cafe as you enter Scotland, there was loads of cyclists there. Obviously a popular place.

Thanks everyone who offered advice to me.

Good luck to anyone wishing to do the event.

puffin
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Re: How many miles of training

Postby puffin » 5 Sep 2016, 10:23am

Dennis
Ouch!!

In the spring pick up from where you left off.

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Re: How many miles of training

Postby denniswpearce » 19 Jun 2020, 8:49am

It’s been a few years now since I tried and failed the Lejog 2016 in fact, it’s well documented on here regarding my sore bum.
The ride was both pleasurable and painful all at the same time.
I tried many suggestions, countless saddles, clothing, two different bike fits. In fact the riding position on the bike has never been more comfortable, in fact I only resolved that part after the ride.
Also visited the Dr, but he said everything looked normal in the rear end.
Even now I still get pain from my sit bones after 30 miles. I still wear two pairs of padded bib shorts to provide a bit more padding. I also know just by looking at the gel pad wether they will chafe or not, so buying the right make is easier.
Don’t think I will ever resolve the soreness in my sit bones, it’s just something I have to endure.
I love cycling and can still maintain my average speed at my age so happy with that.
I suppose the Covid 19 thing has scuppered peoples plans for Lejog this year.
Enjoy your cycling everyone