Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Specific board for this popular undertaking.
Shreds
Posts: 43
Joined: 19 Dec 2010, 4:43am

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Shreds » 14 Jun 2020, 10:07pm

whoof wrote:
I have have ridden a two week tour including through the Alps on a light weight road bike and have all my stuff in a single pannier with no bar bag
Clothes that double up for on and off bike are useful;SPD shoes, lightweight running tops that can be used as t shirts and base layers, buff, lightweight wool gloves and waterproof jacket Plus light fleece and walking trousers that double as shorts .Technical gear dries quickly so no problem with washing and drying in hotels.

Travelling light doesn't have to mean walking around at night in your the same gear you have been cycling in.


Agreed. 8)

Jamesh
Posts: 1324
Joined: 2 Jan 2017, 5:56pm

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Jamesh » 15 Jun 2020, 9:11am

Shreds wrote:
whoof wrote:
I have have ridden a two week tour including through the Alps on a light weight road bike and have all my stuff in a single pannier with no bar bag
Clothes that double up for on and off bike are useful;SPD shoes, lightweight running tops that can be used as t shirts and base layers, buff, lightweight wool gloves and waterproof jacket Plus light fleece and walking trousers that double as shorts .Technical gear dries quickly so no problem with washing and drying in hotels.

Travelling light doesn't have to mean walking around at night in your the same gear you have been cycling in.


Agreed. 8)


+1
I managed to get it into a seat pack - carradice maxi, frame bag and a small bar top bag.

I was still able to look presentable for nights our to restarants and family.

Touring spd shoes are great in that you can actually walk in them sensibly as well as pedaling efficiently.

Cheers James

Gearoidmuar
Posts: 2223
Joined: 29 Sep 2007, 7:35pm
Location: Cork, Ireland. Corcaigh, Éire má tá Gaeilge agat.

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Gearoidmuar » 18 Jun 2020, 8:59am

I've done a supported Lejog 4 times, three times on a Thorn Raven Tour which weighs 35lb and once on a slightly lighter converted MTB. Was only carrying a half filled pannier as the rest was in the van.
70-100m is a helluva big range. We averaged 64m per day, 16d, with 4000ft plus average climbing and I did this at ages of 59, 61, 64 and 67. I was 40lb overweight for the first two.
I'm completely average athletically, i.e on top of Bell Curve.

Some advice. If you're doing 100m per day it's a much taller order than 70 or 60.
Cornwall and Devon are very hilly as is the Peak District and Yorkshire. Cumbria is fine and the Scottish route we went on is easier.

My advice. Go for shorter than longer per day. Allow one or two rest days. Don't race. Watch your backside. Use a saddle you're well used to and your usual kit. You need a serious gear-range. My Rohloff has something like 18-95 gear inches. That's perfect.

As for pedals/shoes. I used MTB style SPDs for very many years but am now on flat pedals due to a torn meniscus. I've an entry on this in the health section. You don't need clipless pedals, but if you use them, don't use new cleats or shoes out of the box. What you're used to.

Don't forget suncream, a chain breaker, spare tubes, canvas to patch a torn sidewall, clothes for snow etc.

Amateur John
Posts: 7
Joined: 9 Jun 2020, 11:56am

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Amateur John » 18 Jun 2020, 11:01am

nosmarbaj wrote:A lot of replies suggest carrying minimal luggage. While you certainly don't want to carry more than you need, at 70-100 miles/day you'll probably have at least as much waking time off the bike as on it. So depending on what you like to do of an evening, you may wish to carry a selection of non-cycling clothes, suitable for wearing in restaurants, pubs etc. - of course you could wear your cycling stuff in such places but personally I like to have a couple of tops, trousers, non-cycling shorts (in summer), and non-cycling shoes. Also consider how often you want to be washing your cycling kit, which dictates how many spares you need. And what about reading matter, tablet computer (I find my phone's screen is too small for relaxed viewing), camera, etc.?. When I did LEJoG in 2008 I had a bar bag and a pair of panniers for a 12-day B&B trip; if I did it again I'd take about the same amount of luggage.

I'm not saying this is the "right" approach, but it is one way of doing it, and a sporty road bike wouldn't be suitable. Your current bike would work fine. The suggestions regarding tyres are good.

By the way, you say you're planning on doing it in a couple of years - I assume this is because doing it sooner doesn't fit in with other plans. Otherwise with your existing level of fitness and current bike, you could start as soon as the Covid-19 restrictions are eased.



I was trying to be realistic regarding my mileage for the day, but may up it depending on my capability nearer the time. However, I don't want to put myself in a position where I'm still on the bike struggling to get to my destination late into the evening. Currently I'm planning to cycle this on my own, so conversely I don't want to have loads of time off the bike unless there is something of interest near where I'm staying.

Will be travelling as light as I can and will try to take as many clothes that can be warn in the evening as well as on the bike (changing in the evening obviously). Maybe 4 different sets? Will wash either every evening or every other evening depending on how smelly/dirty they are, but will have a new set on everyday. Was thinking on just taking shower gel and using that to have a shower and wash clothes by hand. No clothes that I take will need ironing.

As for reading material, I am planning to replace my mobile phone and will get one with a larger screen so that I can do everything on it, this will also be my camera. I don't want to take a small laptop as I have read others have done as I don't want the extra weight. If the weather is bad in the evening then I will probably just write up my diary or blog and watch a bit of TV. Some B&Bs have books to read, so I would take advantage of that. I would probably be too tired for anything else.

I couldn't really consider doing this ride much sooner than in 2 years time as my job wouldn't allow. I also have children that I wouldn't want to leave for 2 weeks at the expense on going on holiday with them. If something changes with my job situation then I will look at doing this sooner, but at the moment I can only take my holiday at certain times of year. In 2 years time I will be looking at either changing my hours of the job or changing jobs.

Following the suggestions made by you and others, I will upgrade my existing bike first including a butterfly handlebar, replacement peddles for bike shoes and trainers and new tyres. If I can get a small improvement in speed then I will stick with this bike.

Shreds
Posts: 43
Joined: 19 Dec 2010, 4:43am

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Shreds » 18 Jun 2020, 11:45am

Watch TV, books ...... good luck...., would imagine eat drink, shower, make a short note of day and sleep will be all you want to do followed by repeat for the whole journey but each to their own.

Amateur John
Posts: 7
Joined: 9 Jun 2020, 11:56am

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Amateur John » 18 Jun 2020, 11:56am

Gearoidmuar wrote:I've done a supported Lejog 4 times, three times on a Thorn Raven Tour which weighs 35lb and once on a slightly lighter converted MTB. Was only carrying a half filled pannier as the rest was in the van.
70-100m is a helluva big range. We averaged 64m per day, 16d, with 4000ft plus average climbing and I did this at ages of 59, 61, 64 and 67. I was 40lb overweight for the first two.
I'm completely average athletically, i.e on top of Bell Curve.

Some advice. If you're doing 100m per day it's a much taller order than 70 or 60.
Cornwall and Devon are very hilly as is the Peak District and Yorkshire. Cumbria is fine and the Scottish route we went on is easier.

My advice. Go for shorter than longer per day. Allow one or two rest days. Don't race. Watch your backside. Use a saddle you're well used to and your usual kit. You need a serious gear-range. My Rohloff has something like 18-95 gear inches. That's perfect.

As for pedals/shoes. I used MTB style SPDs for very many years but am now on flat pedals due to a torn meniscus. I've an entry on this in the health section. You don't need clipless pedals, but if you use them, don't use new cleats or shoes out of the box. What you're used to.

Don't forget suncream, a chain breaker, spare tubes, canvas to patch a torn sidewall, clothes for snow etc.



Excellent advice, I was hoping I could manage to get all my gear in at under 15kg, so 35lbs would be right at the top end of my range. This may prove to be unrealistic, don't know yet.

Just started to look at routes yesterday and I can see this may prove to be the most time consuming part of the planning. I've found a couple of sites that will generate routes for me based on minimal criteria. Think I will use that as a base and tweak the routes more to my liking. I don't like busy roads so have started with quiet routes and NSN networks. Also trying to workout inclines for the day so that I can adjust my mileage accordingly. Haven't decided whether I will book all the B&Bs for the trip or book while on the trip depending on distance travelled. Is that too risky? I don't really want to be cycling in heavy rain, so having flexibility would be nice.

Based on this advice, rather than have rest days I may fit in a few short mileage days in places of interest. That would give my legs a chance to recover. Definitely not planning to race, just want to progress at a decent speed and stop if I find somewhere interesting.

I've always cycled using flat peddles and know very little about the options or benefits of the different types. I did read somewhere that having peddles that were flat on one side but allow cycling shoe use on the other side was an option. Also gears, I know nothing about them so I will have a read up to get more informed.

whoof
Posts: 2364
Joined: 29 Apr 2014, 2:13pm

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby whoof » 18 Jun 2020, 12:59pm

Amateur John wrote:
nosmarbaj wrote:A lot of replies suggest carrying minimal luggage. While you certainly don't want to carry more than you need, at 70-100 miles/day you'll probably have at least as much waking time off the bike as on it. So depending on what you like to do of an evening, you may wish to carry a selection of non-cycling clothes, suitable for wearing in restaurants, pubs etc. - of course you could wear your cycling stuff in such places but personally I like to have a couple of tops, trousers, non-cycling shorts (in summer), and non-cycling shoes. Also consider how often you want to be washing your cycling kit, which dictates how many spares you need. And what about reading matter, tablet computer (I find my phone's screen is too small for relaxed viewing), camera, etc.?. When I did LEJoG in 2008 I had a bar bag and a pair of panniers for a 12-day B&B trip; if I did it again I'd take about the same amount of luggage.

I'm not saying this is the "right" approach, but it is one way of doing it, and a sporty road bike wouldn't be suitable. Your current bike would work fine. The suggestions regarding tyres are good.

By the way, you say you're planning on doing it in a couple of years - I assume this is because doing it sooner doesn't fit in with other plans. Otherwise with your existing level of fitness and current bike, you could start as soon as the Covid-19 restrictions are eased.





Will be travelling as light as I can and will try to take as many clothes that can be warn in the evening as well as on the bike (changing in the evening obviously). Maybe 4 different sets? Will wash either every evening or every other evening depending on how smelly/dirty they are, but will have a new set on everyday. Was thinking on just taking shower gel and using that to have a shower and wash clothes by hand. No clothes that I take will need ironing.



This is the basis of my B&B touring clothing. It includes what I would be wearing as well as carrying
Cycling cap
Buff
Two running t-shirts
Short sleeved cycling Jersey
Arm & leg warmers
Two pairs cycling shorts
Two pairs of socks
SPD shoes
Flip flops
Water proof cycling jacket
Light fleece
Walking trousers, legs can be removed to turn into shorts.
One pair of boxer shorts.
One pair cycling mits
One pair light wool gloves

Jamesh
Posts: 1324
Joined: 2 Jan 2017, 5:56pm

Re: Bike upgrade for LEJOG

Postby Jamesh » 18 Jun 2020, 3:08pm

whoof wrote:
Amateur John wrote:
nosmarbaj wrote:A lot of replies suggest carrying minimal luggage. While you certainly don't want to carry more than you need, at 70-100 miles/day you'll probably have at least as much waking time off the bike as on it. So depending on what you like to do of an evening, you may wish to carry a selection of non-cycling clothes, suitable for wearing in restaurants, pubs etc. - of course you could wear your cycling stuff in such places but personally I like to have a couple of tops, trousers, non-cycling shorts (in summer), and non-cycling shoes. Also consider how often you want to be washing your cycling kit, which dictates how many spares you need. And what about reading matter, tablet computer (I find my phone's screen is too small for relaxed viewing), camera, etc.?. When I did LEJoG in 2008 I had a bar bag and a pair of panniers for a 12-day B&B trip; if I did it again I'd take about the same amount of luggage.

I'm not saying this is the "right" approach, but it is one way of doing it, and a sporty road bike wouldn't be suitable. Your current bike would work fine. The suggestions regarding tyres are good.

By the way, you say you're planning on doing it in a couple of years - I assume this is because doing it sooner doesn't fit in with other plans. Otherwise with your existing level of fitness and current bike, you could start as soon as the Covid-19 restrictions are eased.





Will be travelling as light as I can and will try to take as many clothes that can be warn in the evening as well as on the bike (changing in the evening obviously). Maybe 4 different sets? Will wash either every evening or every other evening depending on how smelly/dirty they are, but will have a new set on everyday. Was thinking on just taking shower gel and using that to have a shower and wash clothes by hand. No clothes that I take will need ironing.



This is the basis of my B&B touring clothing. It includes what I would be wearing as well as carrying
Cycling cap
Buff
Two running t-shirts
Short sleeved cycling Jersey
Arm & leg warmers
Two pairs cycling shorts
Two pairs of socks
SPD shoes
Flip flops
Water proof cycling jacket
Light fleece
Walking trousers, legs can be removed to turn into shorts.
One pair of boxer shorts.
One pair cycling mits
One pair light wool gloves


+1

Except I use tights and a long sleeve Jersey instead of arm / leg warmers.

Fluo waterproof jacket gets strapped round the saddle bag with small elastic buggie.

Don't bother with flip flops been to onsite hotel restaurant with socks on before!!

Always running t shirts never cotton!

Cheers James