Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Specific board for this popular undertaking.
Srutterford
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Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby Srutterford » 3 Oct 2020, 7:14am

Hello,
I'm considering a self-guided LEJOG but I want to take a comfortable amount of luggage. I looked yesterday at using cabs to transport luggage between B&Bs and I reckon it would cost over £1,000. Has anyone identified a better way or is a guided tour or taking and carrying minimal luggage the only way?
Thanks,
Sharyn.

PH
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby PH » 3 Oct 2020, 10:18am

I'd just minimise kit, but don't do so to the extent you're not comfortable with it. Anything that has a dual purpose is an advantage, so cyclewear you're also happy wearing off the bike is great. The hassle with minimal kit is keeping it clean and fresh, so clothing that dries easily overnight is a plus.
The other alternative is to arrange bag drops where you're staying, post stuff ahead and post stuff back. It'd take some organising, but having fresh kit every third or forth day could reduce what you're carrying.
Also don't overestimate the effect a few kilos has on the riding, I find I get used to it very quickly then forget about it.

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robgul
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby robgul » 3 Oct 2020, 10:29am

The idea of cabs to shift luggage is probably unrealistic - and as you say, costly.

Noting that you want to do a self-guided ride .... how rigid can you be on accommodation? One option that might work is to talk to the several E2E trip organisers that offer a complete package BUT ask them if they are willing to let you do your own thing between stops. Yes it means you're tied to their stops but not their group ride (you would also forego the on-road support)

The idea may not work for you but I can't see any other way to avoid luggage carrying*

* when I did my first E2E (JOGLE) we had all the stops planned and had sent a package of kit to my daughter who lived at approx half-way - and had sent some stuff home from a stops at 1/3 and 2/3 distance. Second E2E the other way and I just took less kit!!

Rob
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PS: I can assure you that the velvet slippers and smoking jacket will NOT be required :D :D
E2E http://www.cycle-endtoend.org.uk
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Brianjeff50
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby Brianjeff50 » 3 Oct 2020, 10:50am

I just did a self guided LEJOG and carried my stuff in two panniers. I took two sets of outer riding kit (one being worn, one spare) and a set of layers from base to cold/wet. Wore a pair of Shimano MTB shoes so they could double for reasonably comfortable walking and a pair of flip flops for emergency off-bike use. For ‘evening wear’ just had a pair of lightweight trousers that could zip into shorts and a tee shirt. A bike mid layer doubled as a jumper. TBH if you’re on a bike all day all you’ll want is to shower, eat and sleep after.
If you pick your overnight stops carefully you’ll probably find a few friendly Airbnbs where you can get kit washed.

Jdsk
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby Jdsk » 3 Oct 2020, 10:52am

We often use luggage transfer services on walking holidays. But the distances are rather less...

You've got the main options: carry it, pay someone else, post it... but there is also buy and discard. We once posted some books and clothing up to the Western isles, and all of our camping equipment a quarter of the way across France. The only issue is understanding exactly how it works. (Posting books was before Kindles, of course.)

But, as above, I suggest having another think about reducing the amount and carrying it all. Have you found some of those useful lists of minimal equipment?

Jonathan
Last edited by Jdsk on 5 Oct 2020, 2:03pm, edited 1 time in total.

nickyboy
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby nickyboy » 5 Oct 2020, 2:02pm

I suppose with enough planning you could arrange a series of bag drops that you then posted a further 2/3 days along the ride. That way you could get away with about 3 lots of whatever you need. But it seems a bit fraught
We are self supported staying in B&Bs etc and we've just decided to travel light. With a few compromises we've got the bags and contents down to 5kg (although we are returning home half way through the ride so this helps a bit). I suggest you look at the stripped down option first. Then if that doesn't work for you for whatever reason, maybe the "posting 3 days on" might work

Srutterford
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby Srutterford » 7 Oct 2020, 7:54am

Thanks for your helpful suggestions, all. We've caught up and realised we can probably manage with paniers plus a meeting with people from home half way though. How exciting!

mumbojumbo
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby mumbojumbo » 7 Oct 2020, 2:17pm

You should take 3 socks,wash a sock a day and dry on bars.A shirt can be worn for 2 days and washed etc.Shorts for 3 days etc,So you will need a spare sock,shirt and shorts.Three spare items wont take much carrying-possibly in a bar bag.How much do combat troops carry>They need grub ammo sleeping bag first aid etc.You would need more if going Trans- Siberia but a jaunt in rural Britain is not too bad.If need be dive into a charity shop or recycling bins for clothing.The taxi route is for Prince William and Arry.

simonhill
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby simonhill » 9 Oct 2020, 6:19pm

I'm intrigued what "a comfortable amount of luggage" is.

Assuming you are doing the ride straight off without lots of days off for sightseeing and socialising, I can't see what you need to take. Unless your partners/friends expect you to be in a different outfit every evening, it's one set of off bike, with a couple of add ons (fleece, lightweight down jacket, etc). Then it's just your cycling kit, doubling up where necessary. All that hardly adds up to a single pannier.

On my travels I used to see backpackers in hostels with huge rucksacks and wondered what they carried in them as they were usually seen in shorts and tee shirts. One day I saw a girl going to the shower with 2 x litre bottles of shampoo and conditioner. No doubt a hairdryer hiding in the bag as well. If you must carry toiletries, decant to small plastic bottles, but better still use the stuff in the b&bs.

Having spare space in your bags is useful for carrying food, etc especially when you get to more remote areas.

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Tigerbiten
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby Tigerbiten » 9 Oct 2020, 6:32pm

If the worst comes to the worst and your light weight bike won't take the extra load of panniers, then you can always tow a trailer ...... :lol:

mumbojumbo
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby mumbojumbo » 10 Oct 2020, 1:16pm

That suggestion could work if you went with a slightly weaker cyclists assuming one can be found.You could put both sets in a trailer and the other person could cover bnb or refreshments.

pwa
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby pwa » 10 Oct 2020, 5:33pm

With padded cycle shorts, if you wash them as soon as you get in your room for the night you maximise drying time. Wring them out thoroughly after washing, then lay them out flat on a towel (provided by your accommodation) and roll up the towel and shorts like a sausage. Fold that over on itself then stand on it and stay stood on it for a few moments. Then remove the shorts from the towel. The towel will have absorbed most of the water that was in the shorts so that hanging the shorts up overnight will see them close to being dry by the morning. It works. And if they are still a tiny bit damp in the morning it doesn't matter much because that is just how they would be after a bit of sweating. They will feel fine after they have warmed on your body. So one pair of cycle shorts will do it. That was what I did on our summer tour and I had nice clean shorts every day without having to carry spares.

pete75
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby pete75 » 11 Oct 2020, 3:38pm

It doesn't have to be minimal luggage carried on the bike. A full set of panniers and you can carry over 80 litres, add a saddlebag and a bar bag and you can take 100 litres. Even just a couple of rear panniers can give you over 50 litres of carrying capacity though if you're not camping a 24 litre Carradice camper Longflap saddle bag should be more than sufficient. We do a lot of touring, mainly cycle camping and use front and rear panniers. The weight slows your acceleration but doesn't have much effect on cruising speed. You'll go a bit slower up hills and you'll go faster down them.

mumbojumbo
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby mumbojumbo » 11 Oct 2020, 4:27pm

I am surprised at your claim that extra weight will not affect cruising speed.Have you measured this objectively or is it basedon your feelings?

pete75
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Re: Transporting kit on a self-guided tour

Postby pete75 » 11 Oct 2020, 4:46pm

mumbojumbo wrote:I am surprised at your claim that extra weight will not affect cruising speed.Have you measured this objectively or is it basedon your feelings?

I didn't say it won't affect cruising speed I said it doesn't have much effect on it. It's based on how long it takes to cover a certain distance.