Some Observations by a YHA warden

Specific board for this popular undertaking.
Ben@Forest
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby Ben@Forest » 8 Jan 2018, 9:00am

brynpoeth wrote:What else does the warder recommend?
Is a hostel more like a church or more like a prison?


I think that by using the word 'warder' you've already made up your mind! :wink:

In the days of 'chores' you could have said there was more of a disciplined regime tho' I'm sure that was nothing like prison, but I'm not sure you could make any comparison with a church. Sometimes when I've stayed at a hostel on a very quiet night you could possibly compare it to a retreat? But of course I (and I'm sure many others) have stayed at a hostel when 30 schoolkids were also there - then it is more like a noisy school!

Tilley
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby Tilley » 8 Jan 2018, 1:30pm

I have a Trice TNT 2009 which I bought second hand and it came with mudguards front and rear. What I soon found was that the front mudguards worked adequately unless you were passing through standing water. The excess water was then sprayed sideways from the guards resulting in very wet thighs. To resolve this I have fixed sections of Foamex board to the mudguard stays and now have no issue with spray from the mudguards.

brynpoeth
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby brynpoeth » 8 Jan 2018, 1:43pm

The wardern wants to double the turnover of the YH, he suggests LeJoGers take rest days, +1
I did stay at Slaidburn once (ScoCym)
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras & STOP signs

Jon Lucas
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby Jon Lucas » 9 Jan 2018, 12:48pm

brynpoeth wrote:This is supposed to be about hostelling :wink:
All hostels had efficient drying rooms back then, so getting wet at the end of the day was not so bad


Well, almost all. On my coastal ride round Britain some of the heaviest rain I endured was around Lochinver in Sutherland, and having got absolutely soaked during the day the rain then turned into a real monsoon for the last few miles to Achmelvich hostel. Completely drenched, I squelched my way in across a field of long wet grass, and found myself amidst a hostel full of wet socks and leggings dripping everywhere, and the only hostel I've ever stayed at which didn't have a drying room. This was over 10 years ago, so maybe it has one now. I certainly hope so, as it rains a lot round there!

brynpoeth
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby brynpoeth » 25 Oct 2018, 8:07am

Do wardens still keep members cards overnight? That gives them a lot of power to enforce the rules, +/-1?
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras & STOP signs

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meic
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby meic » 25 Oct 2018, 9:19am

No, They hardly even look at your card when you book in.
They are more concerned about some sort of ID to satisfy government's latest outsourcing of immigration control.
Also I suspect that actual members are now a minority of those staying on any one night.
Though a larger minority than independent youths.
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reohn2
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Re:

Postby reohn2 » 25 Oct 2018, 9:32am

kwackers wrote:
Ben Lovejoy wrote:A broken bracket recently forced me to try the experiment of riding with no front mudguards on the TRICE, and it made surprisingly little difference to me and no impact on a ride behind. I'm going to leave them off from now on and just use the rear one.

Ben


Is there a front mudguard that actually works? I just get a bead of water from the front edge of the wheel that arcs gracefully through the air and into my eyes...

A mud flap made from a length of either building DPC or truck inner tube a little wider than the mudguard and within 25mm of the road surface bolted to the bottom of the front guard,will keep bike and rider dry and clean,it's a must for anyone riding in all weather's.
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kwackers
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Re: Re:

Postby kwackers » 25 Oct 2018, 9:51am

reohn2 wrote:A mud flap made from a length of either building DPC or truck inner tube a little wider than the mudguard and within 25mm of the road surface bolted to the bottom of the front guard,will keep bike and rider dry and clean,it's a must for anyone riding in all weather's.

Quoted from 10 years ago!

I don't even recognise the person that originally wrote that (nor do I have that problem anymore, must have figured out a solution at some point... :wink: )

puffin
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby puffin » 29 Oct 2018, 6:53pm

Slaidburn is wonderful, I've stopped there most times. Last but one time a brilliant warden sat with me and took me through the history and the politics of the YHA, it was fascinating. That night I slept in the games room due to a snorer. In 2017 I checked in ..then had a Road to Damascus moment; I was too old for YHA's and the Hark to Bounty was beckoning me. I cracked, took a last photo and have not stayed in a YH since. Don't judge me :(

Last year i stopped and asked to use the pump there (I'm still a YHA member) and the guy was brilliant. I met him the following day at the top of the pass. He gave me some great ideas about touring; I repaid him slightly by saying that farmhouse over there has a woofy dog; sure enough, it was still there and woofed. I hope he was impressed.
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charliepolecat
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby charliepolecat » 29 Oct 2018, 7:28pm

I didn't think there was an age limit for staying in YHA's or do you mean you were just too geographically old anyway for hostels :shock: ?

puffin
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby puffin » 30 Oct 2018, 11:01am

charliepolecat wrote:I didn't think there was an age limit for staying in YHA's or do you mean you were just too geographically old anyway for hostels :shock: ?

I just felt the luxuries of life mattered more to me now. :)

charliepolecat
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby charliepolecat » 30 Oct 2018, 3:39pm

I just felt the luxuries of life mattered more to me now. :)


Careful, that luxuriously silk lined coffin might become enticing as well. :P

puffin
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby puffin » 31 Oct 2018, 11:32am

charliepolecat wrote:
I just felt the luxuries of life mattered more to me now. :)


Careful, that luxuriously silk lined coffin might become enticing as well. :P


Actually that's quite enticing; i used to be a Goth.

reohn2
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Re: Re:

Postby reohn2 » 31 Oct 2018, 11:58am

kwackers wrote:
reohn2 wrote:A mud flap made from a length of either building DPC or truck inner tube a little wider than the mudguard and within 25mm of the road surface bolted to the bottom of the front guard,will keep bike and rider dry and clean,it's a must for anyone riding in all weather's.

Quoted from 10 years ago!

I don't even recognise the person that originally wrote that (nor do I have that problem anymore, must have figured out a solution at some point... :wink: )

:shock: :oops: :wink:
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horizon
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Re: Some Observations by a YHA warden

Postby horizon » 31 Oct 2018, 12:10pm

puffin wrote: I was too old for YHA's


Or too well off.

Youth hostels have a range of advantages over say a Travelodge (the company of other cyclists/walkers, drying room, cycle shed, comfy common room, kitchen, good location perhaps etc etc). These might appeal to anyone other than those staying in four star hotels. But their chief advantage is (or was) their low cost. And this depends I would have thought almost entirely on sharing a room with several strangers in close proximity.

Even at my stage of life I find it difficult to fund a longish trip using own-room accommodation, whether that be YHAs with own room, B and Bs or even early bookings in Travelodges, especially if travelling alone. While it's still possible to find it cheaper, £60 per night may be the going rate and over just 5 nights that's £300 - and still no kitchen for a cheap self-cooked meal.

I think sharing a dorm is good character-building for anyone but it's my least favourite aspect of a hostel - the comfort factor isn't so important. In fact, there are other problems with sharing with strangers and that includes niggles over security and losing odd socks. So it isn't just other people's snoring. In other respects most hostels these days are superb (where they exist).

So I've taken more to cycle camping in the summer to solve both problems (privacy and cost) and in the winter a mix of B and Bs, kindly relatives and the odd hostel (if you can find one).
It's autumn in England with the trees turning golden. So we say leaves mean leaves.