what bike for LEJOG

Specific board for this popular undertaking.
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brother nathaneil
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby brother nathaneil » 23 Nov 2011, 3:15pm

Vix wrote:What part of the LEJOG ride is the hardest??????

I actually found Devon and Cornwall very... well not "easy" but not "dificult" either. That's because I had cycled 800 miles and had my "cycling legs" on.

Everyone we spoke to heading north said that "Devon and Cornwall" was "really hard"... Everyone we spoke to heading south said that "bits of Scotland" were "really hard". I think wherever you start it will feel hard, but train well and you'll be fine. If I was okay, I'm sure anyone can be.

bearonabike wrote:Everyone says Devon & Cornwall....and everyone's right from a geographical perspective.

As quoted, just because it's supposed to be "the hard bit" or "the easy bit" doesn't mean it will be!!!
Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome ~ Arthur Ashe

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Vix
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Vix » 26 Nov 2011, 7:13pm

Anybody got any advice on nutrition whilst cycling LEJOG??

JohnCKirk
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby JohnCKirk » 26 Nov 2011, 7:14pm

Vix wrote:Anybody got any advice on nutrition whilst cycling LEJOG??


There's a discussion about that here ("Food advice sought"):
http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=57572

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Vix
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Vix » 26 Nov 2011, 7:35pm

Thanks for the lead John.

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Vix
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Vix » 1 Dec 2011, 6:39pm

I've more or less decided on my bike for LEJOG... think I'm going to go for a Ridgeback Voyage, any comments would be welcome.

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Vix
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Vix » 7 Dec 2011, 8:47am

What do people think the most important pieces of clothing are to take for LEJOG ??

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Mick F
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Mick F » 7 Dec 2011, 10:35am

Something comfortable to ride in all day - every day.

Something light and waterproof too.

Also, something else to wear in the evening so you can go down the local pub and socialise.
Mick F. Cornwall

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horizon
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby horizon » 7 Dec 2011, 11:19am

Vix wrote:I've more or less decided on my bike for LEJOG... think I'm going to go for a Ridgeback Voyage, any comments would be welcome.


It's a good choice (or one like it) but if you cannot try one out at a dealer's do try to do some homework on the geometry. It is hard to make an exact comparison but the equivalent Dawes tourers appear to have both a shorter top tube and a shorter stem. While the Voyage is exactly the right kind of bike for the ride, you might find yourself too stretched out.

I don't like to keep recommending Dawes (firstly in case people think I've got shares in the company, secondly because I don't have any special information that the quality is any better than similar bikes). However, both Surly and Ridgeback seem to have gone for a longer top tube giving a more athletic riding position. You won't find this out though until you ride the bike. The stem on the Voyage can easily be changed to a shorter, more comfortable one - the one in their on-line brochure looks like a full length 110mm but I cannot verify this.

PS I've just checked your other posts. If you currently have a Boardman you may find the stretched out position on the Voyage fine though it may be worth doing some serious measuring on it and comparing it to the Voyage.
The experience of travel is something that you have to pay for but can never buy. Ho Ri Zon Chinese philosopher

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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby JohnCKirk » 7 Dec 2011, 4:19pm

Vix wrote:What do people think the most important pieces of clothing are to take for LEJOG ??


Take a variety of clothes, e.g. something with short sleeves and something with long sleeves (for arms/legs). When I had breakfast at Land's End YHA, I was wearing a short-sleeved jersey and shorts, while everyone else had long sleeves/tights; I was a bit concerned that they knew something I didn't, but I turned out to be quite comfortable that way. I didn't use the tights during my trip, but I did use the long sleeved jersey in the evenings. Definitely take some kind of cagoule for the rain; I didn't bother with anything for my legs, since they'll dry out quite quickly anyway. Overshoes may be useful in that situation.

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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Gavin Hill » 8 Dec 2011, 2:14pm

brother nathaneil wrote:
Vix wrote:What part of the LEJOG ride is the hardest??????

I actually found Devon and Cornwall very... well not "easy" but not "dificult" either. That's because I had cycled 800 miles and had my "cycling legs" on.

I'd agree with this.
Key lessons I learned:
- I did JOGLE because I didn't want to face getting back from JOG at the end. Better to do that while you're fresh. Glad I did, although it of course depends on where you live.
- Like you I planned a scenic route away from the main roads. The scenery was fantastic, but I paid a price in having to fight my way up more hills and diverted back to some main roads ocassionally when I was flagging.
- I spent ages planning the route. But the biggest mistake I made was not looking at the elavations closely enough. It wasn't the big hills that were the problem - you can just grind your way up these or walk if you have to - it was the days when I had to climb hills for hour after hour that drained my energy. One big hill on a route elevation will mask lots of medium ones.
- Don't underestimate the affect of wind & driving rain. My toughest days were in Scotland when I had to fight headwinds and it rained all day. By contrast Devon & Cornwall seemed okay, because I had no wind & rain and had built up some stamina by then
- Take the absolute minimum amount of gear and spares. It's all too easy to get into the "I'll take it just in case I need it" mode when you're doing a long trip. You will regret it and in hindsight I could have reduced my load by a third.
- Try to leave the B&B as early as possible. Many will lay on an early breakfast or pack something if you ask. This way you get a good start, don't feel under such pressure to get to the next B&B and can do a bit of sight-seeing.
- Eat and drink regularly. I stopped about every hour for a few minutes. I didn't bother about any special high energy drinks or food, so long as you are consuming lots of liquid and carbs. I ate a mountain of flapjacks!
- Above all enjoy the whole experience and make the most of it. The sense of achievement when you get there is fantastic.

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Vix
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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Vix » 12 Dec 2011, 12:25pm

horizon wrote:
Vix wrote:I've more or less decided on my bike for LEJOG... think I'm going to go for a Ridgeback Voyage, any comments would be welcome.


I'm planning to pay a little extra and have the bike fitted for me specific, hopefully this lead a more comfortable ride, thanks for the advice :D

It's a good choice (or one like it) but if you cannot try one out at a dealer's do try to do some homework on the geometry. It is hard to make an exact comparison but the equivalent Dawes tourers appear to have both a shorter top tube and a shorter stem. While the Voyage is exactly the right kind of bike for the ride, you might find yourself too stretched out.

I don't like to keep recommending Dawes (firstly in case people think I've got shares in the company, secondly because I don't have any special information that the quality is any better than similar bikes). However, both Surly and Ridgeback seem to have gone for a longer top tube giving a more athletic riding position. You won't find this out though until you ride the bike. The stem on the Voyage can easily be changed to a shorter, more comfortable one - the one in their on-line brochure looks like a full length 110mm but I cannot verify this.

PS I've just checked your other posts. If you currently have a Boardman you may find the stretched out position on the Voyage fine though it may be worth doing some serious measuring on it and comparing it to the Voyage.
[/quote]

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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby loafer » 13 Dec 2011, 10:16pm

Vix wrote:What part of the LEJOG ride is the hardest??????


hi vix
planning and getting every thing booked .. :lol: which bike you choose +luggage options once you have them sorted try a few w/ends away to get used it..poss you can look at a hybrid my g/f friend used hers on our c2c ride gearing was low and rack fitted for panniers :D

larry

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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Ron » 14 Dec 2011, 1:14pm

Vix wrote:What part of the LEJOG ride is the hardest??????

The hardest is getting beyond your own front door, once you are out of sight of home the game is a dawdle. :)

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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby Vix » 14 Dec 2011, 7:32pm

I have another question for you guys...... What are the best pedals to use? clip on or regular??? your thoughts would be very much appreciated.

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Re: what bike for LEJOG

Postby phil parker » 14 Dec 2011, 8:02pm

Clip-on - SPD pedals and shoes of the MTB/touring variety.

They will take a bit of practice and getting used to, but they are much better and more efficient. With the SPD pedal you can get shoes with recessed cleats that allow you to walk reasonably comfortable in the shoes as well.

Of course there are lots of choices - I would look at something like the Shimano SPD A520 pedal as a benchmark for touring and any preferences as a variation of them. For shoes, again there are plenty of choices, but you can get SPD shoes looking like regular training shoes, which are good for both on and off the bike when you are completing a tour.