Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

screen_shot
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Joined: 28 Oct 2017, 12:18pm

Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby screen_shot » 28 Oct 2017, 12:24pm

HI
Im looking to buy a women canyon endurance and my measurements when put into the calculator are coming up as a XS but when i visited the Canyon shop the guy said i should be a Small and showed me a XS bike which i thought looked too small.
Any idea if the calculator is reliable or should i go with my instincts and purchase the small
height: 167
inseam: 76
weight:60
torso length: 67
shoulder: 38
arm length: 53

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531colin
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Re: Canyon sizing

Postby 531colin » 28 Oct 2017, 6:31pm

How do they feel on the test ride?
You aren't going to buy one without a test ride, are you?
I had a look on the Canyon website, and there seems to be loads of models.
Just picking one at random (Endurance Women's AL 6) the geo. chart is here....https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/road/endurace/endurace-wmn-al-6-0.html
.....comparing XS and S, the Small has only 6mm more reach, but the handlebars are 15mm higher.
(This is the usual trade-off if you think you are "between sizes".....the bigger bike will get the bars higher, at the "cost" of longer reach.)
The XS bike also has a shallower head angle, I doubt the fork offset is increased to compensate, therefore the XS bike will have slower steering than the Small.
If you post the actual bike you are looking at, we can have a look at the proper geo. chart, assuming they differ.

On my tape measure, 167 is about 5'6"......I would expect the smallest size to fit somebody maybe 5'2" ?

Flinders
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby Flinders » 28 Nov 2017, 1:12pm

I'd echo Colin- ride one and find out the right size that way, particularly if you are small, provided they can get one in your size for you to try (sometimes they can't unless you agree to buy if it's an unusual size). It's easy to get a frame that is too big to be comfortable.
I'm 5' and my Ridley Triton T is an XXS; even with a sloping top tube, when stopped, I can only just reach the ground with my tip toes on one side when in the saddle- and the saddle is as low as it can go. However, I actually need a long stem to get sufficient forward reach, the bars are set nearly but not quite as low as they will go, and I wouldn't want the bars any higher than they are.

The frame config is going to matter a lot if you are one of us small people- it's much easier for us to end up with a frame that can't be set up to do what we need. I think from what I hear and read most shops tend to sell small people bikes that are too big. One shop years ago wanted me to have a frame that was far and away too big - my protests that I'd never be able to touch the floor (this was for London commuting) were met with 'you'll manage'. It would have been my fist ever bike- I was going to be learning to ride on it. I know now that if I'd had that one it would not have been good for my personal bottom bracket.

My previous bike to the current one was a Dalesman. In my size, it steered like a tank; I suspect many makers don't adjust frame geometry to help smaller frames steer properly. I've just bought a 2nd hand TT frame, as they aren't made any more and it suits me so well.

I'd take any advice Colin gives you very seriously, he gave me good advice when setting up my saddle.

LollyKat
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby LollyKat » 3 Dec 2017, 9:35pm

Flinders wrote:...even with a sloping top tube, when stopped, I can only just reach the ground with my tip toes on one side when in the saddle- and the saddle is as low as it can go. However, I actually need a long stem to get sufficient forward reach, the bars are set nearly but not quite as low as they will go, and I wouldn't want the bars any higher than they are.

You don't necessarily have to be able to reach the ground when in the saddle - I can't. I can see it is reassuring for new riders, but I have always eased out of the saddle when stopping so that I can plant my foot firmly. It's not a problem even though I commute in a busy city. If I put the saddle lower pedalling is uncomfortable and my knees get very painful.

Flinders
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby Flinders » 4 Dec 2017, 1:30pm

Depends on where you cycle. I have to get off the saddle to put a foot down fully, but I rarely do that- only when stuck for a while at lights or a junction. I would feel unsafe in stop-start traffic if I couldn't balance from the saddle with a tiptoe.

Those of us with short legs can also end up badly set up wrt the cranks if we get a frame that's too large and have to put the saddle too high, as there isn't much variety in crank lengths compared to leg lengths.

LollyKat
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby LollyKat » 7 Dec 2017, 8:17pm

Flinders wrote:Depends on where you cycle.....I would feel unsafe in stop-start traffic if I couldn't balance from the saddle with a tiptoe.

I often ride in stop-start traffic and still ease off the saddle. I use strapless toeclips (like these), so that if necessary I can partly hop with my left foot and partly pedal with my right if traffic is almost at a standstill. I've been doing it for over 30 years - it's second nature, and means that I don't need to worry about deep cambers and bad road surfaces.

Flinders
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby Flinders » 7 Dec 2017, 8:43pm

Used to use clips and straps n my London commute, but now I have gone clipless....resisted the change for a long time, but I wouldn't go back now. I can still hop as you do, toe down, but clipped into the to pedal on the other side, but can do if from the saddle.

LollyKat
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby LollyKat » 8 Dec 2017, 10:56am

Years ago I used to be able to stay in the saddle and put a tip-toe down, just, but my current bike has a higher bottom bracket and shorter cranks which require a higher saddle.

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531colin
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Re: Canyon Endurance sizing advice conflict . . . .

Postby 531colin » 9 Dec 2017, 8:31pm

Several things....
OP hasn't posted after the initial post, so we are probably talking to ourselves......
OP isn't short at all.....5'6" by my estimation.
I don't remember how tall Lolly Kat is.....but a high bottom bracket and short cranks is a recipe for not being able to get your foot down.
Small bikes SHOULD HAVE LOWER bottom bracket than big bikes......because they will (should) be fitted with shorter cranks.
I forget what brand of bike the OP was looking at, but I couldn't find BB height (or drop) on their website......very many manufacturers use the same BB drop on all sizes.
When designing bikes, I always start with "my size", which as I'm "Mr average" has 170mm cranks. For a bike which I judge should be fitted with 165mm cranks, I lower the BB at least 5mm......I'm tempted to lower it more than the difference in crank length, because my leg and foot, being longer, can "extend" more to reach the ground.
Another recipe for not being able to touch the ground is to follow the current fashions for having a steep seat angle, and putting your saddle height so that you have to be on tiptoe to reach the pedal at the bottom.
Putting the saddle back moves it further away from the pedals just a surely as putting it up......if you put the saddle far forwards, its more difficult to pedal with your foot level, and people end up pedalling toe down, then they raise the saddle so they don't have an excessive bend in the knee.....result is they can't touch the ground without slipping off the saddle.