What is stopping women from cycling?

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Sweep
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Sweep » 6 Aug 2019, 8:33am

tony_mm wrote:Holland is a progressive country.
Here it is not. Women usually stay in their “traditional” roles.

That is an incredibly sweeping statement.
Not sure where you live that all those brit women are lashed into "traditional roles".
Sweep

Oldjohnw
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Oldjohnw » 6 Aug 2019, 8:35am

Mike Sales wrote:
cotterpins wrote:"where far more women want to cycle" You're quote.
I've noticed that women who want to cycle in this country do!


I wonder why so many more Dutch women than British want to cycle.
Is it genetic do you think?
Or is it the environment?


Possibly for the same reason that so many more Dutch men than British men want to cycle.
John

Cycling and recycling

Mike Sales
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Mike Sales » 6 Aug 2019, 9:10am

Oldjohnw wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
cotterpins wrote:"where far more women want to cycle" You're quote.
I've noticed that women who want to cycle in this country do!


I wonder why so many more Dutch women than British want to cycle.
Is it genetic do you think?
Or is it the environment?


Possibly for the same reason that so many more Dutch men than British men want to cycle.


Likely. You mean the environment?

But Dutch women make more trips than Dutch men.

Mike Sales
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Mike Sales » 6 Aug 2019, 9:17am

Carlton green wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
I wonder why so many more Dutch women than British want to cycle.
Is it genetic do you think?
Or is it the environment?


My suspicion is that it’s environmental and it’s cultural. Large parts of the U.K. are hilly so much physical effort (and strength) is required to go up the hills and braking coming down them can need a good grip on the brakes too. The infrastructure to allow safe travel is mostly not here in the U.K. but the Dutch have ensured that they have the cycle paths. Critical mass will play a part too, because if a lady knows or sees another lady who cycles then they are more likely to do so themselves; additionally suppliers and manufacturers provide solutions for the female market when that market is large and already there. Bikes can be complex things that men typically seem happy to manage and women typically want to just use (if It doesn’t work easily for them, with their skill set, then they’ll use a different solution to getting about).


I live in the Parts of Lincolnshire called Holland. In lack of contours it closely resembles the one just across the North Sea.
But in numbers cycling it is much more like the rest of this sometimes lumpy island.
The reasons you mention no doubt apply, to varying extents.
Women in the Netherlands make more trips by bike than men.
Here in Holland few of either sex cycle.

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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby pjclinch » 6 Aug 2019, 11:53am

Carlton green wrote:
My suspicion is that it’s environmental and it’s cultural. Large parts of the U.K. are hilly so much physical effort (and strength) is required to go up the hills and braking coming down them can need a good grip on the brakes too.


First up, I think "the environment" in previous posts in this thread is a more all-encompassing thing than the physical geography a cyclist may be dealing with, but that said...

The cultural thing (i.e., the perception that cycling is difficult and awkward and just won't do) is such that the fact that technology has to a fair extent killed the purely practical issues has gone unnoticed by many of the people that could benefit. Hills? e-bikes make going up them a bit of a moot point. Hydraulic disc brakes mean speed is easily controlled with fingertip pressure.

There was an entertaining exchange on Twitter recently where someone said cycling was no use if you were pregnant or wanted to wear a dress or had toddlers or babies to move around. Cue lots of pictures of women moving toddlers, babies, their pregnant selves including wearing dresses around Dutch towns and the original tweeter saying that was "stock footage" and didn't mean anything. It was pointed out you can see that every day in NL just by looking around you.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

Oldjohnw
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Oldjohnw » 6 Aug 2019, 12:29pm

I was assuming that the environment was not just physical - although clearly it matters hugely - but the whole ethos. Going shopping, taking children to school, doing deliveries (all of these men as well as women) are all normal respected activities.
John

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Mike Sales
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Mike Sales » 6 Aug 2019, 12:36pm

Oldjohnw wrote:I was assuming that the environment was not just physical



Me too.

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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Carlton green » 6 Aug 2019, 1:11pm

For what it’s worth a dictionary definition of environment can be found here: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictio ... nvironment

It seems that ‘environment’ has a couple of meanings but it’s basically about physical things.
# the air, water, and land in or on which people, animals, and plants live
# the conditions that you live or work in and the way that they influence how you feel or how effectively you can work

I did mention ‘environment and culture’ in one of my earlier posts, two areas rather than one.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictio ... ?q=Culture
# the way of life, especially the general customs and beliefs, of a particular group of people at a particular time

I hope that the above is helpful, it’s not meant to be anything else.

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Sweep
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Sweep » 6 Aug 2019, 3:22pm

Not day to day cycling but very impressive non the less.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cycling/49248126

Not my sort of cycling but does this mean that certain sports cycling events could be opened to both genders?
Sweep

mattheus
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby mattheus » 6 Aug 2019, 4:12pm

Sweep wrote:Not day to day cycling but very impressive non the less.


More day after day?

After day. After day ...

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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby fivetoedsloth » 6 Aug 2019, 9:42pm

First time poster here---

I'm a 52 yr old American woman living in Dallas, Texas, and have read most of this thread with interest, as I rarely see any commuter cyclists of either gender in my area. I've been bike commuting in the sweltering Texas heat for 2 months now, and I have encountered a lot of people surprised, worried, and curious about my reasons for doing it. Here in Texas, and most of the U.S. for that matter, cars rule the roads. Most people here consider cycling dangerous for both genders because of traffic and lack of bike lanes, but also because of the dangerously high temperatures. Today it's 98 degrees F -- 37 Celsius, with air quality warnings. It's supposed to be over 100 the rest of this week. I deal with this by bringing at least 2 bottles of ice water and wearing long-sleeved sunproof shirts and long pants to keep my skin from burning. On top of that, we tend to get some vicious Texas thunderstorms and hailstorms that can crop up out of the blue. Nobody wants to drive in that, never mind bike.

For the most part here in America, people seem impressed with someone that will undertake the goal of bike commuting. I've been able to park my pannier-laden bike inside restaurants and shops, and everyone I've spoken to has given me an encouraging thumbs up. So far, I haven't had any nasty encounters with cars or jerks, although I had one near miss the other day when a guy came roaring out of an auto body shop onto a low-traffic road, nearly hitting me as I passed on the sidewalk. I'm still not sure whose fault that was. Here, it's legal to ride on the sidewalks (we have virtually no pedestrians) so I often do that when traffic is heavy or I worry about my own visibility.

I have grown more confident in the past couple of months, and now prefer to take the road whenever I can due to speed and smooth pavement, although I bounce back and forth between street and sidewalk depending on how safe I feel. We have a lot of oblivious cell-phone-distracted drivers here who are not used to seeing a slow moving bike in their lane. Also, there are a lot of huge pickups and SUVs roaring along the roads, which is intimidating. And far too many drunk drivers at night (and even sometimes during the day). So I'm never all that comfortable when I'm on the road, counting on other drivers to avoid me.

But our sidewalks can be quite uneven and unmaintained, with big oak trees pushing the pavement slabs to dangerous heights, and sprinkler runoff creating mud pits in the low sections. It's a slow slog when riding on sidewalks sometimes. Also, sidewalks aren't everywhere, so you end up going over grass or empty gravel lots sometimes. On my first week of finding a safe route to the office, I caught a nasty full-body case of poison ivy as I cut through a field of high grass in my efforts to avoid the other hazards. ~sigh~

So I'd say a big deterrent to my female friends in Texas, as well as male friends, taking up the challenge of bike commuting is:

- oppressive, dangerous heat
- fear factor of sharing a road with oblivious/speeding drivers
- lack of shower facilities in most workplaces
- difficulty/discomfort of transporting work stuff and cargo on your back (most bikes here don't have racks or panniers)
- distance between destinations often makes it impractical or too time consuming
- Other errands, such as kid pickups/drop offs, isn't possible by bike

Despite all those issues, I've been LOVING bike commuting. I've seen so many things I wouldn't have in a car.

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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby brynpoeth » 7 Aug 2019, 5:48am

Positive thread alert, Plus One!

Like you probably I ride quite slowly because of emerging vehicles, there are only a couple of short bits on the way to work where I may go as fast as I can :?
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What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby fivetoedsloth » 7 Aug 2019, 1:42pm

This is why I love bike commuting. I have seen this inquisitive roadrunner 4 times so far on my commute. Each time, I have stopped my bike and watched him. He doesn’t run away; just watches me and coos. (I also didn’t know roadrunners coo. I thought they went “beep beep!”)

I discovered that the Great Road Runner is native to the Dallas/Ft Worth area. Who knew? I have never seen one in all my years of driving here. Image


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Last edited by fivetoedsloth on 7 Aug 2019, 1:42pm, edited 1 time in total.

mattheus
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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby mattheus » 7 Aug 2019, 1:58pm

fivetoedsloth wrote:This is why I love bike commuting. I have seen this inquisitive roadrunner 4 times so far on my commute. Each time, I have stopped my bike and watched him. He doesn’t run away; just watches me and coos. (I also didn’t know roadrunners coo. I thought they went “beep beep!”)

I always thought it was "Meep Meep" !

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Re: What is stopping women from cycling?

Postby Vorpal » 7 Aug 2019, 2:04pm

mattheus wrote:
fivetoedsloth wrote:This is why I love bike commuting. I have seen this inquisitive roadrunner 4 times so far on my commute. Each time, I have stopped my bike and watched him. He doesn’t run away; just watches me and coos. (I also didn’t know roadrunners coo. I thought they went “beep beep!”)

I always thought it was "Meep Meep" !

it's "Beep beep!", <wink>

:lol:
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