UK Tricycle Riding

drossall
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby drossall » 12 May 2020, 8:35pm

When I joined my first cycling club in 1977, they claimed to have more trikes than any other in the country, and ran an annual tricycle invitation run. Of course we all tried one, and failed horribly to ride it. So, 25 years later, when I had the funds and opportunity to buy one second-hand, I did.

Basically what tatanab said, but I ride a fraction of the time that he does, and have a fraction of the expertise.

JordanMcGrory
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Joined: 15 May 2020, 10:52pm

Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby JordanMcGrory » 15 May 2020, 11:14pm

Just wanted to say hello because I have exactly the same question and this thread has been super helpful.

I have cerebral palsy which effects my right side and my balance, so I could never master a bike. I had a 'full size' (if that's the phrase?) tricycle when I was kid so I could join in with my friends cycling. I'm looking to get back into it for the exercise because I'm in my 30s now and frankly I'm getting chubby!

Much like trikegirl I'm a bit lost as to what sort to buy. There seem to be a number of cheaper models from Mission and BuyTricycle's (I assume own brand) "Scout" trike, the mid-range with Pashley and then the really expensive imports from the European brands like Pfiff, but I'm really struggling to understand the practical difference between them all!

drossall
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby drossall » 16 May 2020, 8:23am

I think, with any cycle purchase, the first thing is the kind and distance of riding that you want to do, and purpose e.g. any luggage carrying. Especially with a trike, but for some people with bikes, you do have to consider any storage constraints. For trikes, that includes getting them through doorways, which has been mentioned already. As you say, much of this is covered earlier in the thread.

Trikegirl
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Trikegirl » 16 May 2020, 9:54am

Hi Jordan! Welcome!

It is confusing isn’t it. There are so many brands and they are/were Greek to me. For my own research, the differences I have found include:

- steel frame or aluminium (lighter, I think)
- wheel size
- where it is made - U.K. or otherwise

I am sure there are others.

I rode a tricycle as a kid but never a bike. It may have been because I had perforated eardrums that my parents didn’t buy a bike because it affects your balance. Anyway, I loved that trike and still do.

This current lockdown has me hankering to get out in the fresh air and, being asthmatic, exercise is great. I could also do with firming up!

I have decided to get a Pashley because it appears to be THE brand for tricycles in the U.K. The two models, Picador and Tri-1, both have steel frames. I have read that aluminium frames give a little rougher ride, hence, my preference for steel. As regards strength, steel has the edge. If I were in it for speed, maybe aluminium would be better because I believe it is lighter. Also, lighter may be better if you have to lift it. I am sure others will chime in if I am wrong here.

Pashley is a bit more expensive than other brands I have seen but the dealers I spoke to suggested that I not buy a secondhand bike if I know nothing about bikes so I will get a new one. Ouch!

The Picador is a three speed and is a bit shorter and narrower than the Tri-1. The Tri-1 is a 7-speed and dealers suggested I get the 7-speed even though I am a bit sceptical. They said they would teach me to use 7-speed! As an adult I only rode a single speed trike for about two years so a 7-speed will be new! The other difference is that the Picador comes with a rear basket but it is extra (~£100!) with the the Tri-1.

Other brands mentioned were Longstaff, Jorvik and Mission. I believe they are all aluminium.

Glad you joined. I will learn from your input, too.

tatanab
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby tatanab » 16 May 2020, 10:15am

Trikegirl wrote:Other brands mentioned were Longstaff,-----. I believe they are all aluminium.
Steel. Longstaff is not currently building (last few years). He built lightweight frames for the club rider like me but also put a variant of his axle onto stock mountain bike frames which were sold under the name Cyclon. The axle design is far superior in ever way to that of the usual utility trikes. These occasionally come up on eBay. The new price for these was about 3 times that of a Pashley, but on eBay they tend to be quite cheap because people don't know what they are.

Weight - the usual utility machines tend to be heavy, around 50 pounds. So some people could find them unwieldy to move around perhaps to access a shed. Somebody near me had one he got very cheaply because the person who bought it new had not considered that she lived 3 floors up with no outside storage.

Cyril Haearn
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Cyril Haearn » 16 May 2020, 10:55am

'Dealers recommend buying new not u$€d'
One wonders why :wink:

Best to wait a while before deciding, it is a big decision and can not be reversed easily

I think trikes, like tandems, are often bought in error, not used much, sold later. There must be some little-used secondhand machines available, maybe from dealers with guarantee
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Trikegirl
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Trikegirl » 16 May 2020, 11:02am

Well, with a secondhand bike, I have only found a few and they are in England. Of those only one was decent. It was from a private party and no way to ship it to Scotland, especially during lockdown. They were all listed as collection in person only. I also phoned a few dealers but none had any used Pashleys. I did find one demo but they wouldn’t ship it.

Cyril Haearn
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Cyril Haearn » 16 May 2020, 11:09am

drossall wrote:When I joined my first cycling club in 1977, they claimed to have more trikes than any other in the country, and ran an annual tricycle invitation run. Of course we all tried one, and failed horribly to ride it. So, 25 years later, when I had the funds and opportunity to buy one second-hand, I did.

Basically what tatanab said, but I ride a fraction of the time that he does, and have a fraction of the expertise.

Please to describe how you learned to ride your trike
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tatanab
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby tatanab » 16 May 2020, 11:31am

Cyril Haearn wrote:Please to describe how you learned to ride your trike
Perseverance. You have to get your brain to accept that what basically looks like a bike (the riders view from the saddle) handles quite differently to those experiences learned on 2 wheels. I learned when I was 16. To get the trike out of the way of the family I needed to ride it to school. The first time it took me several times longer than if I had walked (school was quite local) because I had to keep stopping to drag the thing out of the gutter. it was 2 weeks or more before I dared take it on a club ride. The art of learning how far to lean from the saddle or hang off the side only comes with experience. Novice riders are constantly over correcting.

Usual advice is to find somewhere where there are no cambers or other irregularities, somewhere like a car park, and learn to steer the beast. Other things like crossing your arms might help but are not advised beyond off road basic learning. Best advice is always ---PERSEVERE.

Cyril Haearn
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Cyril Haearn » 16 May 2020, 12:26pm

.. and soon enough it is as easy as riding a bike? [bicycle]?
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JordanMcGrory
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby JordanMcGrory » 16 May 2020, 12:43pm

Trikegirl wrote:Well, with a secondhand bike, I have only found a few and they are in England. Of those only one was decent. It was from a private party and no way to ship it to Scotland, especially during lockdown. They were all listed as collection in person only. I also phoned a few dealers but none had any used Pashleys. I did find one demo but they wouldn’t ship it.

https://www.shpock.com/en-gb/i/Xm5JiHi2 ... t-tricycle

This is a pashley, so it's one of the two you are considering. It's down south but the little van symbol means delivery I think. Could be worth enquiring about.

https://www.gumtree.com/p/for-sale/20-t ... 1372641677
This one doesn't give a brand (I've asked and I'll let you know), but it is in Edinburgh which is easier. I suspect it'll be a jorvik though as it looks like the same type as their work.

Trikegirl
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Trikegirl » 16 May 2020, 1:48pm

Thank you, Jordan. The first one is sold and I don’t think the second is a Pashley but thanks for trying.

I hadn’t heard of shpock so I just learned something!

drossall
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby drossall » 16 May 2020, 2:10pm

Cyril Haearn wrote:Please to describe how you learned to ride your trike

What tatanab said, basically. It just doesn't behave the way that, as a bicyclist, you think it will. First it won't steer at all (because you're trying to lean, which you can't), and then it dives repeatedly for the nearest hedge. I've done up to 100km Audaxes now, so I've got the hang of it, but I still dislike strong cambers. I've seen people who can ride trikes no-hands, and I've no idea how they do it, even though I can on a bike. When I thought I'd reached an OK standard a bit back, I followed one well-known trikie down a twisting descent through a Norfolk village, and quickly learned that I had some way to go.

hercule
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby hercule » 16 May 2020, 6:48pm

Trikegirl wrote:Well, with a secondhand bike, I have only found a few and they are in England. Of those only one was decent. It was from a private party and no way to ship it to Scotland, especially during lockdown. They were all listed as collection in person only. I also phoned a few dealers but none had any used Pashleys. I did find one demo but they wouldn’t ship it.


It was like that when I bought my first recumbent (trike)... all the advice was to try before you buy but that wasn’t much use as the nearest dealer was a 500 mile round trip away and the chances of finding one for sale locally in the north of Scotland seemed minuscule. I found one selling for a very good BIN price on eBay and took a chance... shipping it up was complex but in the end well worth it. As you’re not trike naive you will have some idea of what you’re buying.

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Tigerbiten
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Re: UK Tricycle Riding

Postby Tigerbiten » 16 May 2020, 9:13pm

drossall wrote: I've seen people who can ride trikes no-hands, and I've no idea how they do it, even though I can on a bike.

If foxed a first but I eventually learnt to do it on my bent trike.
It's fairly easy if you remember a trike moves away from it's center of gravity.
If you lean to the left on a bike then it turns to the left and visa versa, which is what you expect.
If you lean to the left on a trike then it turns to the right and visa versa, which is not expected ...... :shock:
So you lean out of a turn to turn quicker and into a turn to straighten up.
Which is the opposite of what you do on a bike, hence the fun ....... :lol:
Practice that trick on a gentle uphill slope and you'll soon get the hang of it.

That's why when you lean up a camber to stay upright, the trike automagically dives for the nearest ditch/hedge ........ :D

Luck ............. :D