womens clothes

mumbojumbo
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Re: womens clothes

Postby mumbojumbo » 1 Sep 2018, 1:35pm

I can endorse then use of charity shops in Vilnus,Rega and in other Baltic cities.These women are much taller than your average British pear-shaped woman.I know they have a very successful basketball team,and a plethora of excellent pole -vaulters.I know many plump Europeans have an ab solute filed day in our charity shops,especially those in Hounslow,Southall and similar suburbs adjacent to Heathrow.The poorer EU members arrive by coach so they gravitate towards Chelsea,Fulham and Hammersmith for their clobber.

Harptree
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Re: womens clothes

Postby Harptree » 4 Sep 2018, 8:54pm

I'm interested in this subject as the colder time of year approaches but I feel a bit doubtful about buying Merino wool. There's this practice where Merino sheep basically have their backsides skinned, without anaesthetic, to deal with blowfly strike. It seems pretty unnecessarily nasty to me, speaking as a shepherd of some twenty years. Have they stopped that practice yet, with merino sheep? I find it really offputting when it comes to buying the product. Do warm clothes have to be made of Merino wool?

mumbojumbo
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Re: womens clothes

Postby mumbojumbo » 4 Sep 2018, 9:24pm

'm interested in this subject as the colder time of year approaches but I feel a bit doubtful about buying Merino wool. There's this practice where Merino sheep basically have their backsides skinned, without anaesthetic, to deal with blowfly strike. It seems pretty unnecessarily nasty to me, speaking as a shepherd of some twenty years. Have they stopped that practice yet, with merino sheep? I find it really offputting when it comes to buying the product. Do warm clothes have to be made of Merino wool?


I am sure you do not need to inflict harm on sheep,but I am sure this practice has been exaggerated.The use o.f anerrstheticks is not thar expensive and a bare bottom must pose an infection risk.You can wear other wool clothes but they are itchy-or wear polyester/rayon which is prone to smell The Spanish sailors in the Armada wore Merino wool underwear without having their bottoms skinned.I buy used Merino sweaters and my conscience us clear as I am not the primary consumer.I find those who avoid one product for ethical reasons frequently inflict harm and oppressive practices on humans eg the female solicitor who pays their cleaner £7 per hour,and their gardener £70 per day,yet charge customers £100 per hour.

brynpoeth
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Re: womens clothes

Postby brynpoeth » 4 Sep 2018, 9:27pm

mumbojumbo wrote:
'm interested in this subject as the colder time of year approaches but I feel a bit doubtful about buying Merino wool. There's this practice where Merino sheep basically have their backsides skinned, without anaesthetic, to deal with blowfly strike. It seems pretty unnecessarily nasty to me, speaking as a shepherd of some twenty years. Have they stopped that practice yet, with merino sheep? I find it really offputting when it comes to buying the product. Do warm clothes have to be made of Merino wool?


I am sure you do not need to inflict harm on sheep,but I am sure this practice has been exaggerated.The use o.f anerrstheticks is not thar expensive and a bare bottom must pose an infection risk.You can wear other wool clothes but they are itchy-or wear polyester/rayon which is prone to smell The Spanish sailors in the Armada wore Merino wool underwear without having their bottoms skinned.I buy used Merino sweaters and my conscience us clear as I am not the primary consumer.I find those who avoid one product for ethical reasons frequently inflict harm and oppressive practices on humans eg the female solicitor who pays their cleaner £7 per hour,and their gardener £70 per day,yet charge customers £100 per hour.

Male solicitors do likewise no doubt, they are creating jobs, plusminus

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pjclinch
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Re: womens clothes

Postby pjclinch » 4 Sep 2018, 9:28pm

Yak wool is, at least according to the marketing blurb of folk selling it, even more Super-Duper Miracle Plus then Merino. No personal experience but it's another option.

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Paulatic
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Re: womens clothes

Postby Paulatic » 4 Sep 2018, 9:37pm

Harptree wrote:I'm interested in this subject as the colder time of year approaches but I feel a bit doubtful about buying Merino wool. There's this practice where Merino sheep basically have their backsides skinned, without anaesthetic, to deal with blowfly strike. It seems pretty unnecessarily nasty to me, speaking as a shepherd of some twenty years. Have they stopped that practice yet, with merino sheep? I find it really offputting when it comes to buying the product. Do warm clothes have to be made of Merino wool?


The practise is known as mulesing.
As a shepherd I’ve no doubt you’ve 'cut lambs' ( tailing & docking to those of you in the South). Why did docking become a common? Well as an aid to prevent blowfly. As a shepherd you’ll have witnessed the damage the blowfly can do. An extremely painful death can be common if not spotted early enough.
Do you think what we do here is unnecessarily nasty? Do you avoid buying any UK sheep products?
I think shepherds down under like shepherds here have the welfare of their charge uppermost in their mind and it’s easy to judge on something we perhaps have no practical knowledge of.
Like us, if ever there is an alternative which is kinder, easier to administer, and more affective I’m sure they’ll be keen to use it
It’s a difficult one isn’t it?
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Harptree
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Re: womens clothes

Postby Harptree » 4 Sep 2018, 10:07pm

I use 'Crovect' on my sheep - blowfly prevention is pretty well covered by pour ons and sprays these days.

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Paulatic
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Re: womens clothes

Postby Paulatic » 5 Sep 2018, 8:49am

Harptree wrote:I use 'Crovect' on my sheep - blowfly prevention is pretty well covered by pour ons and sprays these days.


Crovect 6- 8 weeks coverage. IME 6 at best.
Before 'these days' It was better covered by now banned dips.
Merino breeders have all the same products as we have They, they like us, will also be experiencing a longer and longer window of blowfly activity. Global warming no doubt. I’m not condoning their mulesing practice I’m just being very careful in not being quick to judge.
Do you have breeding ewes with docked tails?
Are all your lambs entire?
Have you never inflicted a cut, accidentally I know, while shearing?
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Harptree
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Re: womens clothes

Postby Harptree » 5 Sep 2018, 9:59am

Obviously, when you check your sheep every day, you check on the fly levels. If they are still high - like they are now round here - and its been a while since you Crovected them - you do them again, don't you?

For me, its pretty important that creatures don't experience unnecessary pain or stress. I'm a qualified shearer and yes - with the best will in the world, occasionally there is a cut. I don't think most sheep like being sheared much either, and they find the waiting stressful - you'll see them shaking with fear, some of them. But that fleece is going to harbour parasites that can commonly kill them and it needs to come off - its necessary.

But 'mulesing' IS avoidable. There are much better options. Its the sort of thing that causes me to swerve a product and I'd want to know before I bought anything Merino that that practice hadn't been involved. Its really off-putting. And of course if there are Merino products that can assure me that 'mulesing' hasn't been involved - well, that's different.

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Paulatic
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Re: womens clothes

Postby Paulatic » 5 Sep 2018, 2:26pm

They refer to Sheep stations in thousands of square kilometres I’d guess you’re husbandry might be on hundreds of acres. My last 30 years were over 5000 acres.
I think it’s wrong to expect your husbandry to be replicated in every part of the world.
Why aren’t these 'better options' being used? Or as I suspect if they are better then a lot of herds will be using them but you’ll still hear about the few that don’t. A lable stating 'free from mulesing' would be about as believable as a lable stating 'organic lamb'.
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pjclinch
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Re: womens clothes

Postby pjclinch » 18 Oct 2018, 12:55pm

GCN have a vid on Emma Pooley's guide to women's cycle clothing. As you might expect, towards the performance end of the game rather than commuting, but it's when you're going far and/or fast it matters the most.

https://www.globalcyclingnetwork.com/video/emmas-guide-to-women-s-cycle-clothing-what-cycling-kit-to-wear
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