Cycling for Disabled People.

DIscuss anything relating to non-standard cycles and their equipment.
duncanandeastcoast
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Joined: 6 Feb 2019, 8:20am

Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby duncanandeastcoast » 8 Feb 2019, 2:37pm

Hi everyone,

Does anyone have any advice on the best recumbent tricycle for someone with a severe back injury please. I used to cycle for 20 miles each evening but, since injuring my spine I am unable to ride a bicycle. My therapist thinks that a recumbent trike might allow me to get out, and about again. I only have four requirements; that it has a 26 inch driving wheels, can be ridden comfortably with good side support for long distances, that is has a relatively high seat so that I don't have to have someone lift me out of it, and that it be extremely stable in the corners as my balance is off these days. I would be grateful for any advice that you can offer. Cheers.
D B Wilson

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby [XAP]Bob » 8 Feb 2019, 3:08pm

Hi,

welcome to forum...

Why the 26" requirement?

Where are you in the country?

Depending on the back injury and associated disabilities...

My instant thought was for something like a Kett - reasonably high seat, but generally quite upright, and I can't recall how 'tall' the seat is.
An Adventure, maybe with the seat riser, is another option, or even some "helping hands" to assist with getting in/out.
High and stable don't really go together very well.
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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Tigerbiten
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby Tigerbiten » 8 Feb 2019, 4:17pm

I've seen both the Kett and the Adventure used by various disabled people.
They are very similar in use even though one is a delta and the other is a tadpole.

Do you know if you'll need a hardshell seat shaped to fit your back or a more GP mesh seat that will just support your back and help smooth out bumps.

Why the 26" wheel.
If you've lost any power in your legs then a 20" wheel has lower gears for easier hill climbing.

The trike itself is VATable but any adaptation to it due to your disability may be VAT free.

One idea is try and contact "Kevin Dunseath" at D-Tek based in Little Thetford near Ely.
He does trial morning/afternoons on various recumbents so can try them out.
That way you'll have a better idea on what works for you.

Luck ......... :D

UpWrong
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby UpWrong » 10 Feb 2019, 11:12am

The new Hase Trigo has a higher seat and is good value, although the options can mount up. Also no suspension. Hase list "Get Cycling" in York as having a Trigo demonstrator. Interesting video showing its versatility here, https://youtu.be/JtAQ7KUCrYo

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Cunobelin
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby Cunobelin » 10 Feb 2019, 2:29pm

My wife's trike has "handles that assist in mounting and dismounting

Most makes have them as an accessory.

Image

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atlas_shrugged
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby atlas_shrugged » 11 Feb 2019, 3:49pm

Would recommend an ICE trike because they have an excellent reputation for customer support.

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NUKe
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby NUKe » 11 Feb 2019, 8:31pm

I would recommend giving Kevin at dTek a ring, he has a selection for sale secondhand and does trial sessions where you can try out. He does appear here from time to time.
NUKe
_____________________________________

nigelnightmare
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Joined: 19 Sep 2016, 10:33pm

Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby nigelnightmare » 12 Feb 2019, 1:53pm

atlas_shrugged wrote:Would recommend an ICE trike because they have an excellent reputation for customer support.


+1

Here's their website https://www.icetrikes.co/ have a look.

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Cunobelin
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby Cunobelin » 12 Feb 2019, 5:47pm

nigelnightmare wrote:
atlas_shrugged wrote:Would recommend an ICE trike because they have an excellent reputation for customer support.


+1

Here's their website https://www.icetrikes.co/ have a look.


Each has their own strengths and weaknesses.

Greenspeed does have a trike called the Magnum which has all teh advantages of teh ICE range, but a higher seat making mounting and dismounting easier.


skelo
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby skelo » 12 Feb 2019, 9:33pm

I don't have a back problem but a paralysed left side following a stroke, so similar problems getting up and down I ride a kettweisel and it is ok to get in an out of, just sit down onto the seat and swing my good leg over the boom. you might want to talk to your specialist or physio about the seat first
best advice is to go to a disability cycling specialist and try a few different ones. try Get Cycling in York, the guys there are very knowledgeable and helpful.

if you have adaptations done for your disability it counts as a disability aid so you can get it VAT free which is important as you will be shelling out about £5K for a new one for that reason alone you may as well buy new and get exactly what you need.

It may be worth looking up https://empoweredpeople.co.uk as they have a lot of collective knowledge

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Cunobelin
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby Cunobelin » 12 Feb 2019, 9:36pm

skelo wrote:I don't have a back problem but a paralysed left side following a stroke, so similar problems getting up and down I ride a kettweisel and it is ok to get in an out of, just sit down onto the seat and swing my good leg over the boom. you might want to talk to your specialist or physio about the seat first
best advice is to go to a disability cycling specialist and try a few different ones. try Get Cycling in York, the guys there are very knowledgeable and helpful.

if you have adaptations done for your disability it counts as a disability aid so you can get it VAT free which is important as you will be shelling out about £5K for a new one for that reason alone you may as well buy new and get exactly what you need.

It may be worth looking up https://empoweredpeople.co.uk as they have a lot of collective knowledge

Sort of.... When we bought the Gekko, it was electrically powered, had the supports and "knee savers"

We were able to reclaim VAT on the latter two, but the trike was I sufficiently modified to be able to reclaim VAT

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squeaker
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby squeaker » 14 Feb 2019, 11:06am

'Best' is what works for you, hence the suggestions to go and try some (or state your location: someone might be willing to let you try theirs).
IME a mesh seat is easier to adjust than a hardshell to reduce pressure on painful spots / match you lumbar curve.
I find a suspended 20" wheel (ICE 'T') more comfortable than an un-suspended 26" (ICE Sprint 26).
Higher seat = lower tipping speed - yer pays yer money, etc., although handles as above can make a big difference, as can grabbing hold of the front mech post if you are flexible enough ;)
Good luck with your search.
"42"

Geoff.D
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby Geoff.D » 16 Feb 2019, 10:12pm

All good advice above.

Personally I wouldn't worry about stability in the corners too much. It's true, as others have said, that the higher the seat the more the vulnerability to lifting a wheel at speed. But, in my experience, I quickly got used to the limits of my trike (an ICE RS) and stay within them. The great thing about trikes (with regard to stability) is that it's easier to cope with the unexpected, compared to an upright. Gravel, adverse cambers, leaves, potholes, etc are less of a challenge when cornering (as long as you're not on the limits).

LowdownRider
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby LowdownRider » 4 Apr 2019, 7:38pm

I too have suffered a bad back injury in the past but I have recently test ridden, and now ordered, a new ICE Sprint X Tour.

I also test rode an ICE Adventure, and that I suspect would suit you down to the ground. You can add assisters if you need hand holds to get in and out of the seat, but I managed without using any assistance. It's technique as much as balance, and really not that difficult at all once you have tried it once, honestly.
The Adventure seat is higher off the ground, which should suit you, and the seat is very supportive. You are very unlikely to fall out, unless you did something totally daft like riding up a steep bank, side on, whilst leaning downwards!

I'd recommend getting to your local ICE dealership and trying one for yourself.
The older I get, the more I know, the less makes sense! :lol:

nigelnightmare
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Re: Cycling for Disabled People.

Postby nigelnightmare » 5 Apr 2019, 11:09pm

LowdownRider wrote: You are very unlikely to fall out, unless you did something totally daft like riding up a steep bank, side on, whilst leaning downwards!


I've done that on my ICE Qnt. :oops: TWICE! :roll: Both times I was completely unhurt and no damage to the trike either.

I have nerve damage caused by a neck/spine injury leading to weakness on the right hand side.
I have no difficulty getting in or out of my Qnt or Vortex. I do find the hard-shell seat of the Vortex more supportive when I'm tired.

You can add assistors to the Sprint as well as the Adventure.