Average mph difference

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Just_me
Posts: 4
Joined: 12 Sep 2020, 9:03am

Average mph difference

Postby Just_me » 12 Sep 2020, 1:18pm

Hi all,
I’ve gone from a Brompton Rohloff to an ICE Adventure HD trike for health issues. I’ve not been cycling much due to these issues. I’ve been getting out quite a bit but I’ve noticed my average mph is about half of what it was. I’m guessing most of this is due to fitness, I’m just wondering what other people notice in average speed differences from uprights? Where I live is very hilly, as an example a 15 mile loop is 1500 feet of climbing. Tia.

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[XAP]Bob
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Joined: 26 Sep 2008, 4:12pm

Re: Average mph difference

Postby [XAP]Bob » 12 Sep 2020, 1:31pm

I’d count miles, rides, or time rather than mph if you’re coming back off health issues.
Additionally it’s typically a several hundred to a thousand miles to get ‘bent legs...

The adventure HD isn’t the fastest trike in the world, but it’s a lot faster an not cycling.

I’m starting up again after about 30 months of very limited cycling (100 or so miles total?), but since my style of cycling is radically different from before (30 miles a day commute) I’ve opted for a fast trike to complement my sprint - so my average speed is nearly what it was - though not over the same distance, and I wouldn’t be able to put a second ride in on the same day...

If I can keep riding through the winter (might have to switch up what I ride depending on the weather)
then I’ll be getting back to decent fitness.

Given the change from two to three wheels - what health issues? (This is a question you are quite at liberty to ignore).
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

Just_me
Posts: 4
Joined: 12 Sep 2020, 9:03am

Re: Average mph difference

Postby Just_me » 12 Sep 2020, 3:10pm

Herniated L5 disc which is pressing up against branch nerves. Uprights just antagonise the issue and when I get spells of inflammation I can’t walk more than a few steps.

I’ve done about 300 miles on the trike and I really like it, it’s more out of curiosity than anything.

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[XAP]Bob
Posts: 17819
Joined: 26 Sep 2008, 4:12pm

Re: Average mph difference

Postby [XAP]Bob » 12 Sep 2020, 3:30pm

Ouch.

300 miles in I wouldn’t be too concerned. Enjoy the excercise.
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

Marcus Aurelius
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Joined: 1 Feb 2018, 10:20am

Re: Average mph difference

Postby Marcus Aurelius » 12 Sep 2020, 3:40pm

Forget average mph. It’s a gash metric to work with. There are far too many variables. Work on Normalized power ( NP on Garmins) and effort. Power is Power, if it’s up, you’re improving, if it isn’t you aren’t. It’s independent of conditions and terrain as well, so that makes it far easier to compare efforts.

Shreds
Posts: 56
Joined: 19 Dec 2010, 4:43am

Re: Average mph difference

Postby Shreds » 12 Sep 2020, 4:45pm

Adding a wheel obviously has an impact of a trike over a bike, but I reckon that after about three months of being laid back then you should equate to at least similar speeds all other things being equal. ( obviously slightly lower wind resistance compared to an upright, but your own level of fitness and muscle development must be taken into account).

My view and experience is that a Brompton is noticeably slower, (except perhaps when competing in the World Championships on closed roads, although the ICE would still fare better in such situations).

A lot is said about hill climbing on a laid back, but you do have to also consider how good you were at that before. At least in icy weather on a trike you can keep going when the two wheelers spill on the ice. Brompton’s without Schwalbe Winter studded tyres are better left at home in such conditions. A similar ‘traction’ tyre on the ICE would be advantageous too. :D

Keep at it with the ICE and enjoy!

n0ct0
Posts: 34
Joined: 27 Apr 2020, 2:11pm

Re: Average mph difference

Postby n0ct0 » 12 Sep 2020, 6:07pm

I wouldn’t read too much into average speed on a trike. I averaged just over 10mph on my Scorpion FX, not the world’s fastest trike, while the same ride on a 2 wheel recumbent (HP Speedmachine) or upright (Trek Emonda) would be 17 or 18 mph. Hills count against you with the added weight, and I found it was easy to sit back and spin up hills, obviously this is slower. I also found my average heart rate was lower on the trike. Enjoy the comfort and getting out and about. :D

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squeaker
Posts: 3697
Joined: 12 Jan 2007, 11:43pm
Location: Sussex

Re: Average mph difference

Postby squeaker » 12 Sep 2020, 6:11pm

On an ICE 'T' I have trouble keeping up with my wife on her MTB on road tyres :(

As others have said, enjoy the ride and better view of the world: 'bent legs will develop, but an Adventure HD is for touring, not attacking hills ;)
"42"

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Tigerbiten
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Joined: 29 Jun 2009, 6:49am

Re: Average mph difference

Postby Tigerbiten » 12 Sep 2020, 8:02pm

My average on the flat is only around 12 mph.
Add the trailer full of camping gear for touring and I'm a couple of mph slower.
Add any hills and my average speed can be cut in half, the exact amount depends on how steep/long they are.
A trike needs a different mindset.
It's not about getting up hills as fast as possible.
It's all about getting around while using the minimum amount of energy possible.

Luck ...... :D

UpWrong
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Joined: 31 May 2009, 12:16pm
Location: Portsmouth, Hampshire

Re: Average mph difference

Postby UpWrong » 12 Sep 2020, 9:05pm

For me, maybe 30% slower on a trike than on an upright. I can use more force on the pedals when on the upright. It might be something to do with being less constrained on a saddle than in a seat.

hercule
Posts: 1039
Joined: 5 Feb 2011, 5:18pm

Re: Average mph difference

Postby hercule » 12 Sep 2020, 10:23pm

I spent/wasted the first few years of recumbent striking worrying about how slowly I was going. Then I realised that it wasn't about the speed, it was about the experience. And then I ditched the Garmin. The little LCD display under my nose was just making me miserable. Best cycling thing I ever did! :D

Lodge
Posts: 92
Joined: 28 Feb 2016, 8:59pm
Location: Staffordshire Moorlands

Re: Average mph difference

Postby Lodge » 12 Sep 2020, 11:59pm

I have both an ICE Sprint (with Rohloff) and Brompton (with Rohloff). And yes, the trike is slower for climbing. It's a lot heavier and has increased drag. And yes, I live in a hilly area (Staffordshire Moorlands so almost always head to the Peak District for rides). Both machines are geared appropriately for climbing.

I gave up in the end since I was frustrated and bored spending 95% of the time on the trike at 2-3 mph crawling up hills. A motor was added to the Sprint. Not on the Brompton though. Now the Sprint is faster than the Brompton but not by as much as one would think unless I use boost mode (whereupon the battery runs out in only 17-18 (fun) miles).

As for speed difference - on an identical local circuit over 6.71 miles with 755 feet of ascent I recorded 32:03 min 12.6 mph averaging 76% heart rate max on the Sprint (with motor on eco) and 36:41 11.0 mph at 75% HRM on the Brompton (leg power alone). If I didn't have the power assist from the motor the Sprint would have been rather slower!

And yes, I enjoy collecting and manipulating the data. I'm a statistics/modelling nerd and happy to be so since it keeps me motivated as it gives me numbers to play with.

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Joined: 24 Oct 2012, 10:43pm
Location: English Riviera

Re: Average mph difference

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 13 Sep 2020, 1:03am

Hi,
These are recumbent trikes and are heavier?
I was under the impression that recumbent two wheeled were faster, when I last did audax I was chasing down a recumbent two wheel and he was happy at 24 mph on the flat I was happy at 22 mph on the flat, but i stayed with him for a few miles or more until I dropped my water bottle and he got away :(

So what gives on a trike?
https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/recum ... ics.12344/
NA Thinks Just End 2 End Return + Bivvy
You'll Still Find Me At The Top Of A Hill
Please forgive the poor Grammar I blame it on my mobile and phat thinkers.

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Tigerbiten
Posts: 2113
Joined: 29 Jun 2009, 6:49am

Re: Average mph difference

Postby Tigerbiten » 13 Sep 2020, 12:42pm

I can still remember when I first got my ICE trike.
It had the "standard" 15"-100" derailleur setup.
I was doing around 100-150 miles per week.
But any uphill slope still had me crawling up it in first gear.
Then I went on my first long tour and upped my mileage to around 250-300 miles per week.
I went through 6 weeks of hell as I cycled my way to a new level of fitness.
But I now could get up some slopes in second gear ......... :lol:
So your speed will increase if you can get the miles in.
But depending on your level of effort it may take a thousand miles or more to get there.

Luck ........... :D

UpWrong
Posts: 1005
Joined: 31 May 2009, 12:16pm
Location: Portsmouth, Hampshire

Re: Average mph difference

Postby UpWrong » 13 Sep 2020, 12:52pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
These are recumbent trikes and are heavier?
I was under the impression that recumbent two wheeled were faster, when I last did audax I was chasing down a recumbent two wheel and he was happy at 24 mph on the flat I was happy at 22 mph on the flat, but i stayed with him for a few miles or more until I dropped my water bottle and he got away :(

So what gives on a trike?
https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/recum ... ics.12344/

Yes, trikes are heavier, have more rolling resistance and lose aerodynamic advantage to bikes. I'm one of those people who can't generate as much force when horizontal in a seat compared to when vertical in a saddle. Having said that, in a long ride the gap narrows because its easier to keep up the effort on a trike.