New to recumbents

DIscuss anything relating to non-standard cycles and their equipment.
swscotland bentrider
Posts: 199
Joined: 3 Aug 2008, 4:38pm

Re: New to recumbents

Postby swscotland bentrider » 30 Aug 2011, 12:20pm

I've had a Giro 26ATT for a year now. A very good machine. Once I swapped the wheels / chain / cassette for a lighter items it was down to 27lbs. When out with my mates I was generally faster except on hills. The only negative point for me is the seat. The euromesh is comfortable laid well back but less so when more upright. I'm 6'0'' and have no problem reaching the ground. Handling is superb. I would strongly recommend. However the try before you buy advice is very sound advice.

Cheers

John

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[XAP]Bob
Posts: 16924
Joined: 26 Sep 2008, 4:12pm

Re: New to recumbents - anyone loan / hire / share?

Postby [XAP]Bob » 30 Aug 2011, 2:54pm

Lazy Rider wrote:How do I get past just a tentative interest in 'bents. Trouble is, in North Wales we never see them, nowhere to try them. Could just buy, but they're sooo expensive. Also it appears you need more than a quick ride to find out if it's really for you.

Similar to UpWrong, I've a very bad back and just trying to get cycling after many years. Cannot sit on an upright and 'bents look such a good idea. Currently riding an ancient Schwinn Stingray - it's got me riding, but distinctly limited even though I'm cheating with a motor to help with the weight. That's both the bike and me as we're both tops on the weight.

As Bents are so expensive & I can't justify it yet, I've been watching on eBay. So often they're being sold because of too little use, but people don't really want to get rid. If people offered rental or two or three or more people did timeshares, more people could try for longer, subsidiese others and spread the word.

Any thoughts?


I took a risk based on the exceptional resale value of the machines - they just don't (significantly) depreciate.

Ask around here, hpva, bent riders online - someone will be local. Many trike riders will let you have a go (they're hard to fall off an damage) some two wheeled bent owners will let you play as well...
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

hercule
Posts: 968
Joined: 5 Feb 2011, 5:18pm

Re: New to recumbents

Postby hercule » 30 Aug 2011, 9:19pm

I jumped in, partly because we had a need for something that was disability-friendly. Test rides were really not an option with the nearest dealer being hundreds of miles away. I've never looked back.

Now have two trikes, and two recumbent bikes, one of which I built myself. As [XAP]Bob says, they tend to keep their prices well and you can safely buy a good second hand machine and sell it on for little difference in price if you want to upgrade or find that it's not for you. However, 'bents are different from upright bikes and the many 'bents that you see sold on eBay with just a few miles on the clock are evidence that the buyer's not given them a good trial - it takes something like 1000 miles, according to recumbent lore, to get "'bent legs". Once you have, though, you may well find that you are hooked!

Loomis
Posts: 48
Joined: 14 Jun 2009, 3:47pm

Re: New to recumbents

Postby Loomis » 2 Sep 2011, 9:36am

I too jumped, for exactly the same reasons and restrictions as hercule. After much research and web browsing I bought my Giro 20. The initial problems that everybody has I drove through, having no choice other than to give up the cycling I have loved for so many years. As previously mentioned I think many people give up through the learning period, if they have choices. I have found the Giro to be and excellent introduction to benting, with its riding position being fairly upright and the small front wheel not putting the legs too high in the air. After four hundred miles I am very relaxed most of the time, only getting caught out occasionally at the odd road junction with lots of traffic to contend with. I have absolutely no regrets and always look forward to the next ride. The initial price was high for me, especially taking a chance on it working, but again as previously stated; the resale price would be reasonable if it all went pear shaped. Best of luck.

swscotland bentrider
Posts: 199
Joined: 3 Aug 2008, 4:38pm

Re: New to recumbents

Postby swscotland bentrider » 2 Sep 2011, 11:13pm

The issue with 'bents is that small differences between even similar looking bikes matter to the individual. I've travelled the long way round to get where I am today. First a Nazca Fuego then a Bacchetta Giro 20, a giro 26ATT and now an ICE B2. When I got it I thought the 26ATT was the perfect bike but the B2 (bought as a frameset to perform duties as a tourer) turned out to be (to me!) better. A combination of a slightly lower B/B relative to the more comfortable seat and greater versatility when it came to carrying absolutely suited me. It may not impress another the same way. So unless you try out quite a few you end up spending a lot! :( But Hey ! - it is worth it! :D

Cheers

John